Down Under Series

A special series created for genealogists living Down Under. Webinars are presented live and in respect to the local time zone. Topics include Down Under genealogy, technology, and U.K. and European ancestral research.

40
of
1,814 Webinars Clear filter
Sort by
Sort by
57:25
166 views
CC
Free
Finding Mob: Researching Indigenous Australian Family History
Government Policy in Australia, particularly from Federation until the 1980s, meant that many Australians with indigenous roots have lost connection with family and community. Between adoption, state foster care, missions, hiding ethnicity, and relocation, it is often difficult to know where to start and haw to analyse records. This webinar will present how to start your research, looking at repositories, institutions, and community records that will assist, both indigenous specific and general, in compiling a genealogy or family history.
Government Policy in Australia, particularly from Federation until the 1980s, meant that many Australians with indigenous roots have lost connection with family and community. Between adoption, state foster care, missions, hiding ethnicity, and relocation, it is often difficult to know where to start and haw to analyse records. This webinar will present how to start your research, looking at repositories, institutions, and community records that will assist, both indigenous specific and general, in compiling a genealogy or family history.
Wed, August 3 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:16:46
1.1K views
CC
The Madness of ‘Mc’ Surnames
If you have already worked out that ‘Mc’ and ‘Mac’ surnames are the most complicated British surnames, you must listen to this webinar. And if you haven’t already worked this out, you must absolutely listen to this webinar. ‘Mc’ surnames are double the trouble because they can suffer distortions at the beginning, middle and end of the ‘Mc’ prefix as well as at the beginning, middle and end of the rest of the surname, the root word. Sound glides are a particular problem, in which the ‘k’ sound at the end of the ‘Mc’ prefix distorts the first letter of the root word (e.g. McCue/McKew/McHugh, McLachlan/McGloughlan). Transcription errors can also produce a non-‘Mc’ surname (e.g. Mackever/Markever) which can prove a trap for the unwary. This seminar will help you keep you sane when you encounter the complexities of these mad Scottish-origin surnames.
If you have already worked out that ‘Mc’ and ‘Mac’ surnames are the most complicated British surnames, you must listen to this webinar. And if you haven’t already worked this out, you must absolutely listen to this webinar. ‘Mc’ surnames are double the trouble because they can suffer distortions at the beginning, middle and end of the ‘Mc’ prefix as well as at the beginning, middle and end of the rest of the surname, the root word. Sound glides are a particular problem, in which the ‘k’ sound at the end of the ‘Mc’ prefix distorts the first letter of the root word (e.g. McCue/McKew/McHugh, McLachlan/McGloughlan). Transcription errors can also produce a non-‘Mc’ surname (e.g. Mackever/Markever) which can prove a trap for the unwary. This seminar will help you keep you sane when you encounter the complexities of these mad Scottish-origin surnames.
Wed, July 6 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:07:16
550 views
CC
Government Gazettes as a Genealogical Resource
The Gazettes were the weekly notices of Government activities meant for other government departments and some were available to the public. They are an untapped genealogical resource. The general gazette lists government appointments, various licences, Justices of the Peace, changes to legislation, deceased estates, and so much more. Police Gazettes (only available to Police departments) list police officer movements, reports of crime often listing victims, reports on entry and exit from prison, Missing Friends notices while Education Gazettes list teacher movements, school information and more. Each colony had its own Gazettes and post Federation in 1901 the Commonwealth also produced a Government Gazette.
The Gazettes were the weekly notices of Government activities meant for other government departments and some were available to the public. They are an untapped genealogical resource. The general gazette lists government appointments, various licences, Justices of the Peace, changes to legislation, deceased estates, and so much more. Police Gazettes (only available to Police departments) list police officer movements, reports of crime often listing victims, reports on entry and exit from prison, Missing Friends notices while Education Gazettes list teacher movements, school information and more. Each colony had its own Gazettes and post Federation in 1901 the Commonwealth also produced a Government Gazette.
Wed, June 8 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:06:00
357 views
CC
The Bones – New Zealand Civil Registration
Birth, Marriage and Death information provides the bones of our family history skeleton from which we hang the rest of our research about a person. Learn more about the New Zealand records that give your research structure.
Birth, Marriage and Death information provides the bones of our family history skeleton from which we hang the rest of our research about a person. Learn more about the New Zealand records that give your research structure.
Wed, June 1 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:00:56
517 views
CC
My Top 20 Free Australian Genealogy Websites
This presentation examines free Australian websites useful for genealogy including BDMs, government archives, libraries, local government, and specialist websites in all States and Territories. Using these websites will allow researchers to start building a family tree or to look for someone who may have disappeared down under.
Shauna Hicks
This presentation examines free Australian websites useful for genealogy including BDMs, government archives, libraries, local government, and specialist websites in all States and Territories. Using these websites will allow researchers to start building a family tree or to look for someone who may have disappeared down under.
Wed, April 6 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:32:27
751 views
CC
Exploring the new 1921 UK Census
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:01:16
341 views
CC
Education in Australia
Tracking the movement of ancestors in Australia can be difficult without available census records. However, there are numerous record alternatives, one of which is school admission registers as children are recorded each year, with details including parent’s names and dates of entry and exit. Industrial or trade schools, universities, religious schools and others can also present information not found elsewhere.
Tracking the movement of ancestors in Australia can be difficult without available census records. However, there are numerous record alternatives, one of which is school admission registers as children are recorded each year, with details including parent’s names and dates of entry and exit. Industrial or trade schools, universities, religious schools and others can also present information not found elsewhere.
Wed, February 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:14:44
389 views
CC
Genealogy a la carte – Using Australian historical maps in your research
There is an abundance of Australian maps available online that help depict your family's places of importance – and even more available in libraries and archives around the country.
There is an abundance of Australian maps available online that help depict your family's places of importance – and even more available in libraries and archives around the country.
Wed, December 1 2021: 1:00 UTC
1:15:29
1.0K views
CC
Uncovering the lives of your London (England) ancestors
It can be quite daunting to find your ancestors who lived in the Greater London area as records are held at numerous archives. Parishes number in the hundreds and surprisingly, many Londoners in the 18th and 19th centuries were quite mobile. This presentation will take you through a variety of…
It can be quite daunting to find your ancestors who lived in the Greater London area as records are held at numerous archives. Parishes number in the hundreds and surprisingly, many Londoners in the 18th and 19th centuries were quite mobile. This presentation will take you through a variety of…
Wed, November 3 2021: 1:00 UTC
1:26:22
738 views
CC
A Cargo of Criminals: Transportation to Australia
Over the 80 years of convict transportation, hundreds of ships transported convicts to the penal settlements of Australia. This seminar focuses on the ships, the voyages, and the records relating to transported convicts.
Over the 80 years of convict transportation, hundreds of ships transported convicts to the penal settlements of Australia. This seminar focuses on the ships, the voyages, and the records relating to transported convicts.
Wed, October 6 2021: 1:00 UTC
1:13:03
5.8K views
CC
Burying the Body in England
In England no place of burial is given on the death certificate. This presentation will discuss ways of determining where a person might be buried.
In England no place of burial is given on the death certificate. This presentation will discuss ways of determining where a person might be buried.
Tue, August 3 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:06:39
2.2K views
CC
Death is not the end – litigation remains: Exploring Australian wills and probate
Wills, intestacy files, inventories, letters of administration and other probate records provide family historians with a wealth of information. In Australia, most of these records are held in archives in each state or at the Supreme Court registry. This presentation reviews the types of records available, where they can be…
Wills, intestacy files, inventories, letters of administration and other probate records provide family historians with a wealth of information. In Australia, most of these records are held in archives in each state or at the Supreme Court registry. This presentation reviews the types of records available, where they can be…
Tue, July 6 2021: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (69)
Wed, September 7 2022: 2:00 UTC
Shackles, shekels and shrapnel: the exodus to the Southern seas
Wed, September 7 2022: 2:00 UTC
Changes in Britain post the 1776 War of Independence, along with Capt James Cook’s mapping of New Zealand (1769) and New South Wales (1770), led to convicts and marines being sent to Botany Bay in 1787. So began British migration to the Southern Seas. Factors driving various waves of migration (economic, political, family ties, adventure) will be discussed, along with the effects the British Diasporas had on the Aboriginal and Māori Communities and their environment. Tips on tracing those missing down-under branches of your tree will also be covered.
Changes in Britain post the 1776 War of Independence, along with Capt James Cook’s mapping of New Zealand (1769) and New South Wales (1770), led to convicts and marines being sent to Botany Bay in 1787. So began British migration to the Southern Seas. Factors driving various waves of migration (economic, political, family ties, adventure) will be discussed, along with the effects the British Diasporas had on the Aboriginal and Māori Communities and their environment. Tips on tracing those missing down-under branches of your tree will also be covered.
Wed, September 7 2022: 2:00 UTC
Wed, October 5 2022: 1:00 UTC
Encounters – Our Immigrant Ancestors
Wed, October 5 2022: 1:00 UTC
Learn about 19th and 20th century sources for finding your ancestors’ arrival in New Zealand.
Learn about 19th and 20th century sources for finding your ancestors’ arrival in New Zealand.
Wed, October 5 2022: 1:00 UTC
Wed, November 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Tips & Tricks for Researching in Australian Archives
Wed, November 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
This presentation explains how to search online archive catalogues for maximum results. Just one letter can mean that researchers will not find what they are looking for. Searching variant names and places is critical and numerous examples will allow researchers to search more effectively in Australian online archive catalogues.
Shauna Hicks
This presentation explains how to search online archive catalogues for maximum results. Just one letter can mean that researchers will not find what they are looking for. Searching variant names and places is critical and numerous examples will allow researchers to search more effectively in Australian online archive catalogues.
Wed, November 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Thu, August 11 2022: 0:00 UTC
Need help with grammar and punctuation? There’s a tool for that!
Thu, August 11 2022: 0:00 UTC
We all want our writing to be clear and concise and agonise over getting it just right. Is that the correct word? Have I put the comma in the right place? Should that be an em-dash or an en-dash? Sometimes we just need a tool to help us identify the typos and grammatical inconsistencies or highlight the punctuation errors. This session will demonstrate free tools to improve our writing and help us become better writers.
We all want our writing to be clear and concise and agonise over getting it just right. Is that the correct word? Have I put the comma in the right place? Should that be an em-dash or an en-dash? Sometimes we just need a tool to help us identify the typos and grammatical inconsistencies or highlight the punctuation errors. This session will demonstrate free tools to improve our writing and help us become better writers.
Thu, August 11 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Finding Fayette’s Father: Autosomal DNA Reveals Misattributed Parentage
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Traditional documentation clearly identified Fayette’s father without conflict. However, the DNA results of Fayette’s descendants told a different story. Learn how DNA evidence combined with a trail of clues and the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard revealed a secret from the summer of 1913.
Traditional documentation clearly identified Fayette’s father without conflict. However, the DNA results of Fayette’s descendants told a different story. Learn how DNA evidence combined with a trail of clues and the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard revealed a secret from the summer of 1913.
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, August 17 2022: 18:00 UTC
FamilySearch.org – 5 More Links You Have to Try
Wed, August 17 2022: 18:00 UTC
FamilySearch.org is still a big website. Have you ever wondered if you could search multiple sections of the site at once? What about the best place to go to find hints to add people to the tree? What about experiences that don’t require an account? Come learn about 5 more links you have to try!
FamilySearch.org is still a big website. Have you ever wondered if you could search multiple sections of the site at once? What about the best place to go to find hints to add people to the tree? What about experiences that don’t require an account? Come learn about 5 more links you have to try!
Wed, August 17 2022: 18:00 UTC
Fri, August 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Tracing Your Alberta Connections
Fri, August 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Alberta is unique among the 10 Canadian provinces. It was the last of the three Prairie provinces to be opened to homesteading, which meant land in that province was available just as quality homesteading land dried up in the United States. That brought a rush from south of the border, and the American influence is still felt today. There has been another mass influx of people eager to work in the energy industry. Many of the key sources used in researching your ancestors or cousins in Alberta are also unique, so local knowledge is essential. This session identifies those sources for you, and will help you get results in your searches.
Alberta is unique among the 10 Canadian provinces. It was the last of the three Prairie provinces to be opened to homesteading, which meant land in that province was available just as quality homesteading land dried up in the United States. That brought a rush from south of the border, and the American influence is still felt today. There has been another mass influx of people eager to work in the energy industry. Many of the key sources used in researching your ancestors or cousins in Alberta are also unique, so local knowledge is essential. This session identifies those sources for you, and will help you get results in your searches.
Fri, August 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Tue, August 23 2022: 18:00 UTC
Make your photos speak with DeepStory
Tue, August 23 2022: 18:00 UTC
Learn how to use MyHeritage to breathe new life into your old family photos animating the faces with Deep Nostalgia™ and making them speak with DeepStory.
Learn how to use MyHeritage to breathe new life into your old family photos animating the faces with Deep Nostalgia™ and making them speak with DeepStory.
Tue, August 23 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
Researching Oklahoma Roots
Wed, August 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
The 46th state has a much longer history and more available records than most people realize. You may have discovered a possible link to Oklahoma, a Choctaw word meaning “red people.” Or perhaps you want to search for an elusive ancestor who may have hidden in Indian Territory or Oklahoma Territory, the “Twin Territories” that combined to become Oklahoma. This introduction to Oklahoma genealogical research will highlight the unique records that were created due to our unusual and exciting history.
The 46th state has a much longer history and more available records than most people realize. You may have discovered a possible link to Oklahoma, a Choctaw word meaning “red people.” Or perhaps you want to search for an elusive ancestor who may have hidden in Indian Territory or Oklahoma Territory, the “Twin Territories” that combined to become Oklahoma. This introduction to Oklahoma genealogical research will highlight the unique records that were created due to our unusual and exciting history.
Wed, August 24 2022: 18:00 UTC