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Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral Genealogy in Asia-Pacific: The Essence of Personal Identity and Tribal Connections
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Finding Your Ancestors at the National SAR Genealogical Research Library
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has been collecting research material since its beginning in 1889. Not many people know that their national headquarters and award winning genealogical research library is located in Downtown Louisville Kentucky. Join us on a tour of the research facility and take a deep dive into the rare and expansive collection that awaits national researchers of all skill levels and timeline needs.
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has been collecting research material since its beginning in 1889. Not many people know that their national headquarters and award winning genealogical research library is located in Downtown Louisville Kentucky. Join us on a tour of the research facility and take a deep dive into the rare and expansive collection that awaits national researchers of all skill levels and timeline needs.
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Solving a 1770 problem with the 1880 census
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
He Had a Brother Who Disappeared: Finding John H. Hickey, Formerly of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
Prepping for and Researching at the FamilySearch Library
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
The FamilySearch Library is the premier destination for genealogists. Researchers from around the world flock to Salt Lake City to discover and connect with their ancestors in the world’s largest genealogy library. The FamilySearch Library boasts more than 600,000 books, tens of thousands of historical maps and published pedigrees, and hundreds of workstations where visitors can access dozens of subscription sites. The best kept secret of the library is its incredible mix of volunteer and paid staff that have been specifically trained to help you in your research and how to help you take full advantage of the library’s resources. Whether you are a novice or a professional there is something for everyone at the FamilySearch Library.
The FamilySearch Library is the premier destination for genealogists. Researchers from around the world flock to Salt Lake City to discover and connect with their ancestors in the world’s largest genealogy library. The FamilySearch Library boasts more than 600,000 books, tens of thousands of historical maps and published pedigrees, and hundreds of workstations where visitors can access dozens of subscription sites. The best kept secret of the library is its incredible mix of volunteer and paid staff that have been specifically trained to help you in your research and how to help you take full advantage of the library’s resources. Whether you are a novice or a professional there is something for everyone at the FamilySearch Library.
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, September 6 2024: 15:30 UTC
Elizabeth Matson – the wife of Timothy Mather born 1711 or Timothy Mather born 1747?
Fri, September 6 2024: 15:30 UTC
Which Timothy Mather married Elizabeth Matson? An argument has long been made – based on a faulty entry in a Connecticut vital record book. Discovering the real answer requires taking a deep dive into Connecticut records, reviewing land, probate, militia commissions and more.
Which Timothy Mather married Elizabeth Matson? An argument has long been made – based on a faulty entry in a Connecticut vital record book. Discovering the real answer requires taking a deep dive into Connecticut records, reviewing land, probate, militia commissions and more.
Fri, September 6 2024: 15:30 UTC
Fri, September 6 2024: 19:30 UTC
Bridging Generations: Connecting with Living Relatives Through MyHeritage
Fri, September 6 2024: 19:30 UTC
Connecting with living relatives can unveil a treasure trove of family history beyond the confines of documents and records. Are you making the most of these living links to your past? Join Lisa Lisson for an exploration of MyHeritage’s potent tools, designed to help you build bridges with relatives and unearth precious family memories. From initiating heartfelt conversations to orchestrating virtual family reunions, this session arms you with a toolkit to cherish and deepen intergenerational connections. Walk away with a newfound ability to weave your family’s living stories into your historical tapestry.
Connecting with living relatives can unveil a treasure trove of family history beyond the confines of documents and records. Are you making the most of these living links to your past? Join Lisa Lisson for an exploration of MyHeritage’s potent tools, designed to help you build bridges with relatives and unearth precious family memories. From initiating heartfelt conversations to orchestrating virtual family reunions, this session arms you with a toolkit to cherish and deepen intergenerational connections. Walk away with a newfound ability to weave your family’s living stories into your historical tapestry.
Fri, September 6 2024: 19:30 UTC
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Luff In The Devon Cottages: Exploring A One-Place Study by Kirsty Gray
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Our ancestors were people, just like us. They were born, they lived, they died, they laughed, they cried, and they fell in love – or should that be luff…? Join people-finding wizard and genealogist Kirsty Gray on a journey through her one place study about the small Devon parishes of Luffincott and Tetcott; learn about the history of these villages, their inhabitants and their challenges, as Kirsty talks you through the trials and triumphs of conducting a one place study. This exploration of the past of a remote and rural part of Devon is sure to providing a fascinating window into the past and be a great example of the benefits conducting a one place study can bring.
Our ancestors were people, just like us. They were born, they lived, they died, they laughed, they cried, and they fell in love – or should that be luff…? Join people-finding wizard and genealogist Kirsty Gray on a journey through her one place study about the small Devon parishes of Luffincott and Tetcott; learn about the history of these villages, their inhabitants and their challenges, as Kirsty talks you through the trials and triumphs of conducting a one place study. This exploration of the past of a remote and rural part of Devon is sure to providing a fascinating window into the past and be a great example of the benefits conducting a one place study can bring.
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Fri, September 13 2024: 15:30 UTC
The Neighbors Knew: Strategies for Finding YOUR Ancestral Details in THEIR Records
Fri, September 13 2024: 15:30 UTC
A christening attended, best friend’s wedding, or the same church. Examples from the written words of other people provide details on YOUR family. Marriages, births, deaths, similar jobs, military service, memberships, education, employees, and more on YOUR family. Includes ways to find these other words along with many examples filled with names of other people.
A christening attended, best friend’s wedding, or the same church. Examples from the written words of other people provide details on YOUR family. Marriages, births, deaths, similar jobs, military service, memberships, education, employees, and more on YOUR family. Includes ways to find these other words along with many examples filled with names of other people.
Fri, September 13 2024: 15:30 UTC
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
A Myriad of Slave Databases
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
In the summer of 2023 American Ancestors/New England Historic Genealogical Society announced the collaborative 10 Million Names project, an undertaking to recover the names of people of African descent who were enslaved in the area of the United States. This monumental task of centralizing datasets about African Americans is likely to take years to accomplish; in the interim, this webinar provides a useful survey of the many existing databases that serve a similar purpose though limited in scope.
In the summer of 2023 American Ancestors/New England Historic Genealogical Society announced the collaborative 10 Million Names project, an undertaking to recover the names of people of African descent who were enslaved in the area of the United States. This monumental task of centralizing datasets about African Americans is likely to take years to accomplish; in the interim, this webinar provides a useful survey of the many existing databases that serve a similar purpose though limited in scope.
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
Fri, September 27 2024: 14:15 UTC
Church Records in Archives
Fri, September 27 2024: 14:15 UTC
Church record research is a must for any genealogist. Many of our archives have church records available to researchers. There are also independent church archives for specific religions or denominations that can help you discover your ancestor. Learn from a seasoned genealogist and archivist how to find church records in archives.
Church record research is a must for any genealogist. Many of our archives have church records available to researchers. There are also independent church archives for specific religions or denominations that can help you discover your ancestor. Learn from a seasoned genealogist and archivist how to find church records in archives.
Fri, September 27 2024: 14:15 UTC
Fri, September 27 2024: 19:30 UTC
Finding Origins & Birth Families: Methods That Work
Fri, September 27 2024: 19:30 UTC
The most important path an ancestor blazed along the way from his place of birth to where we first find him is usually not a trail that cartographers have conveniently charted for us. Successful researchers learn to recognize and analyze the elements of an ancestor’s life and times, as well as people, that serve as pointers to his path. This session examines the nature and causes of stalemates in our research; ten common traps and ways to avoid them; and innovative methodologies for working smarter, not harder!
The most important path an ancestor blazed along the way from his place of birth to where we first find him is usually not a trail that cartographers have conveniently charted for us. Successful researchers learn to recognize and analyze the elements of an ancestor’s life and times, as well as people, that serve as pointers to his path. This session examines the nature and causes of stalemates in our research; ten common traps and ways to avoid them; and innovative methodologies for working smarter, not harder!
Fri, September 27 2024: 19:30 UTC

Featured Webinars

View all (2,223)
1:14:47
How to Find the Truth about a Family Story
Oral history provides the foundation for all family research. Documentary evidence builds structure on that foundation. But documents often conflict with family traditions. How do we determine the core truths that are essential to understanding our own past? This class examines the causes of those conflicts and demonstrates how to peel away generations of confusion to find the real story that underpins family lore. Case studies include both Native American and African American traditions.
Oral history provides the foundation for all family research. Documentary evidence builds structure on that foundation. But documents often conflict with family traditions. How do we determine the core truths that are essential to understanding our own past? This class examines the causes of those conflicts and demonstrates how to peel away generations of confusion to find the real story that underpins family lore. Case studies include both Native American and African American traditions.
Fri, June 28 2024: 18:00 UTC
1:24:18
Editing Your Own Work – Part 2
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
1:15:49
Identity Crises: Right Name, Wrong Man? Wrong Name, Right Man?
What do we do with ancestors whose names don’t “match” from one record to the next? Or those who pose the opposite problem: too many men or women of the same name? This session examines a litany of social customs and naming patterns that cause ancestors to be known by different names—then offers techniques and strategies by which we can establish that any two records do or do not apply to the same person. A variety of case studies demonstrate the problems and the methods we can use to overcome them.
What do we do with ancestors whose names don’t “match” from one record to the next? Or those who pose the opposite problem: too many men or women of the same name? This session examines a litany of social customs and naming patterns that cause ancestors to be known by different names—then offers techniques and strategies by which we can establish that any two records do or do not apply to the same person. A variety of case studies demonstrate the problems and the methods we can use to overcome them.
Fri, May 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
1:27:11
Editing Your Own Work – Part 1
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
1:22:27
619 views
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Finding the records for “impossible” genealogy – lessons learned from a Chinese genealogist
Even now, genealogy for underrepresented populations can be considered “impossible.” In this talk you’ll learn which populations are considered so, why that is, and techniques for expanding your genealogical skills. I use Chinese genealogy but the lessons are applicable for all underrepresented genealogical groups.
Even now, genealogy for underrepresented populations can be considered “impossible.” In this talk you’ll learn which populations are considered so, why that is, and techniques for expanding your genealogical skills. I use Chinese genealogy but the lessons are applicable for all underrepresented genealogical groups.
Thu, May 9 2024: 0:00 UTC
1:13:08
595 views
CC
French Emigrants: They Were Not All Huguenots, or Nobles, or from Alsace-Lorraine
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the 19th century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the 19th century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
46:38
1.1K views
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Why can’t I find it? Locating surnames in online databases
Have you ever failed to find a surname in an online database search? Or have you been frustrated at having to undertake multiple searches to find surname variants, and have wondered why such obvious variants are not “grouped” together? Or perhaps you’ve wondered if you’ve missed entries because you don’t understand how these search engines do in fact “group” surnames. Surnames are like the other half of the DNA double helix. It’s all very well if we discover a DNA connection, but if we can’t link the two families together because we can’t find the relevant entries for our ancestors, much of our time and money is wasted. This webinar explains how online databases approach surname spellings, allowing us to maximise our use of their powerful search engines.
Have you ever failed to find a surname in an online database search? Or have you been frustrated at having to undertake multiple searches to find surname variants, and have wondered why such obvious variants are not “grouped” together? Or perhaps you’ve wondered if you’ve missed entries because you don’t understand how these search engines do in fact “group” surnames. Surnames are like the other half of the DNA double helix. It’s all very well if we discover a DNA connection, but if we can’t link the two families together because we can’t find the relevant entries for our ancestors, much of our time and money is wasted. This webinar explains how online databases approach surname spellings, allowing us to maximise our use of their powerful search engines.
Fri, April 12 2024: 4:00 UTC
56:39
1.0K views
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Free
Researching Family History at Your Library with MyHeritage Library Edition
MyHeritage Library Edition is one of the largest, most internationally diverse genealogy databases of its kind. Containing more than 19.5 billion historical records from all over the world, MyHeritage Library Edition leverages cutting-edge technology to make research fast and easy even across different languages, making it the most convenient genealogy product for libraries and institutions. Discover the advanced technology behind the scenes and learn how to take full advantage of the search engine’s robust features to explore the lives of your ancestors from your local library or the convenience of your home with your library card. Don’t take our word for it: come to the session and see for yourself!
MyHeritage Library Edition is one of the largest, most internationally diverse genealogy databases of its kind. Containing more than 19.5 billion historical records from all over the world, MyHeritage Library Edition leverages cutting-edge technology to make research fast and easy even across different languages, making it the most convenient genealogy product for libraries and institutions. Discover the advanced technology behind the scenes and learn how to take full advantage of the search engine’s robust features to explore the lives of your ancestors from your local library or the convenience of your home with your library card. Don’t take our word for it: come to the session and see for yourself!
Thu, April 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
1:11:43
748 views
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Maternal Threads Unwoven: Identifying Margareta’s Mother in 18th Century Sweden
In spite of birth entries for Margareta’s five siblings in Hishult, there was no record of her birth in the parish. Tax records quickly identified the father, and revealed multiple moves within a narrow span of time; however, identification of the mother remained elusive. No witnesses to births of the children provided clues; no household examinations existed. Coupling the understanding of broad context (naming patterns, inheritance laws, the calendar shift, etc.) with mtDNA and documentary evidence, the mother was identified and the lack of a records was explained.
In spite of birth entries for Margareta’s five siblings in Hishult, there was no record of her birth in the parish. Tax records quickly identified the father, and revealed multiple moves within a narrow span of time; however, identification of the mother remained elusive. No witnesses to births of the children provided clues; no household examinations existed. Coupling the understanding of broad context (naming patterns, inheritance laws, the calendar shift, etc.) with mtDNA and documentary evidence, the mother was identified and the lack of a records was explained.
Wed, March 20 2024: 0:00 UTC