10
of
167 Upcoming Live Webinars Clear filter
Wed, February 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
Settlers, Squatters and Selectors: Land ownership in Australia, 1788-1900
Wed, February 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
Since the early days of British settlement in Australia, land has been considered to be one of its greatest assets. Until 1831, some settlers received large grants of land while others were entitled to only 30 acres, plus an additional 20 acres if married and 10 acres for each child. Over the next seventy years, the colonies developed their own land allocation schemes, each devised for a specific purpose. This presentation will highlight the records which relate to Crown Land, pastoral runs, land selection, occupation records, land orders and land ownership.
Since the early days of British settlement in Australia, land has been considered to be one of its greatest assets. Until 1831, some settlers received large grants of land while others were entitled to only 30 acres, plus an additional 20 acres if married and 10 acres for each child. Over the next seventy years, the colonies developed their own land allocation schemes, each devised for a specific purpose. This presentation will highlight the records which relate to Crown Land, pastoral runs, land selection, occupation records, land orders and land ownership.
Wed, February 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
Wed, March 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
Tips and Tools for Navigating the English Probate System
Wed, March 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
The probate system in England and Wales changed significantly in 1858. Learn how the English probate system worked before and after that change, see what records are available and why they are of value. Learn tips and tools for procedures which will simplify the search process, whether the ancestor’s location in England is known or unknown.
The probate system in England and Wales changed significantly in 1858. Learn how the English probate system worked before and after that change, see what records are available and why they are of value. Learn tips and tools for procedures which will simplify the search process, whether the ancestor’s location in England is known or unknown.
Wed, March 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Looking for ‘Aliens’ Down Under: A Guide to Australian Naturalisation Records
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Following the founding of the colony of Australia, individuals born in the British Empire were considered British subjects, irrespective of the nationality of their parents. Residents of Australia whose native place was outside of the British Empire were not afforded the same rights and privileges as British subjects. These rights, in particular the right to buy land and vote, could be conferred to an individual by a process known as naturalisation. This bureaucratic process generated multiple sets of records that contain a wealth of genealogical information. This talk will outline the complex history of naturalisation in Australia, the changing terminology used, how, when and why naturalisation records were created, and discuss the likely availability of records and for whom they may have been created.
Kristy Love
Following the founding of the colony of Australia, individuals born in the British Empire were considered British subjects, irrespective of the nationality of their parents. Residents of Australia whose native place was outside of the British Empire were not afforded the same rights and privileges as British subjects. These rights, in particular the right to buy land and vote, could be conferred to an individual by a process known as naturalisation. This bureaucratic process generated multiple sets of records that contain a wealth of genealogical information. This talk will outline the complex history of naturalisation in Australia, the changing terminology used, how, when and why naturalisation records were created, and discuss the likely availability of records and for whom they may have been created.
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Wed, May 3 2023: 2:00 UTC
Convicts: From Trial to Freedom
Wed, May 3 2023: 2:00 UTC
Convicts are amongst the best documented Australian early settlers. Learn how you can follow the passage of convict ancestors from the initial reports of their crimes, through trial and transportation and the documentation of their period as a convict in an Australian colony.
Kerry Farmer
Convicts are amongst the best documented Australian early settlers. Learn how you can follow the passage of convict ancestors from the initial reports of their crimes, through trial and transportation and the documentation of their period as a convict in an Australian colony.
Wed, May 3 2023: 2:00 UTC
Thu, May 11 2023: 0:00 UTC
A military heritage: Finding your British army lineage in pre-20th century records
Thu, May 11 2023: 0:00 UTC
Many Australians will have a soldier or sailor somewhere in their family tree, particularly from the 20th century onwards. Finding those ancestors who served in Australian contingents during World War One or Two for example, is a relatively straightforward process, mainly because the records are mostly available in Australian archives. However, once the search moves back into the 19th or 18th century, then it can become a more complicated puzzle. This presentation provides an overview of the military history of Europe during the 19th and 18th centuries and outlines the range of records which are available, such as those at The National Archives (UK) in particular as well as Australian archives and military museums and an increasing number of online resources. The wealth of detail will help reveal the life of your military ancestor and may even be able to take your research back into the 18th century.
Many Australians will have a soldier or sailor somewhere in their family tree, particularly from the 20th century onwards. Finding those ancestors who served in Australian contingents during World War One or Two for example, is a relatively straightforward process, mainly because the records are mostly available in Australian archives. However, once the search moves back into the 19th or 18th century, then it can become a more complicated puzzle. This presentation provides an overview of the military history of Europe during the 19th and 18th centuries and outlines the range of records which are available, such as those at The National Archives (UK) in particular as well as Australian archives and military museums and an increasing number of online resources. The wealth of detail will help reveal the life of your military ancestor and may even be able to take your research back into the 18th century.
Thu, May 11 2023: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 7 2023: 2:00 UTC
Another Four Sources for New Zealand Family History
Wed, June 7 2023: 2:00 UTC
Taking a deeper dive into other resources to extend your New Zealand family history research.
Taking a deeper dive into other resources to extend your New Zealand family history research.
Wed, June 7 2023: 2:00 UTC
Wed, August 2 2023: 2:00 UTC
Six Top Sites for Queensland Research
Wed, August 2 2023: 2:00 UTC
Let’s dive into six Queensland, Australia sites for your genealogical research.
Let’s dive into six Queensland, Australia sites for your genealogical research.
Wed, August 2 2023: 2:00 UTC
Tue, September 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
How to Catch a Criminal: Finding Records for Your Rogue Relatives Downunder
Tue, September 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Australia has a wealth of publicly available records for people who have interacted with the criminal justice system, be they criminals, suspects, victims of crime, witnesses in criminal cases, and law enforcement officials, but do you know how to find these records? This talk will do a deep dive into the available record sets, including mug shots, prison registers, criminal court records, inquests and coronial records, and Police Gazettes, among others.
Kristy Love
Australia has a wealth of publicly available records for people who have interacted with the criminal justice system, be they criminals, suspects, victims of crime, witnesses in criminal cases, and law enforcement officials, but do you know how to find these records? This talk will do a deep dive into the available record sets, including mug shots, prison registers, criminal court records, inquests and coronial records, and Police Gazettes, among others.
Tue, September 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Wed, October 4 2023: 1:00 UTC
Gold Fever and Finding Miners Down Under
Wed, October 4 2023: 1:00 UTC
This presentation examines the lure of gold discoveries in various Australian states in the 19th century. Many people travelled down under to try and make their fortunes but didn’t realise just how hard it was working on Australian gold fields. Mining records and newspapers can be used to trace miners and to understand their way of life.
Shauna Hicks
This presentation examines the lure of gold discoveries in various Australian states in the 19th century. Many people travelled down under to try and make their fortunes but didn’t realise just how hard it was working on Australian gold fields. Mining records and newspapers can be used to trace miners and to understand their way of life.
Wed, October 4 2023: 1:00 UTC
Wed, December 6 2023: 1:00 UTC
Can you Write a Wrong? Copyright in Australia
Wed, December 6 2023: 1:00 UTC
Knowing what we can freely use, without permission, in our family histories ensures that we are not infringing on the rights of others. For example, did you know that if you watch your grandmother make her secret pasta sauce, writing down the ingredients and methods she used, you have created your own ‘literary work’ which is now protected by copyright? (Just don’t tell Granny!) How then does copyright law apply to published and unpublished works? What is fair use and moral rights? Can a distant cousin use information in her family book that I have researched? This presentation will examine those aspects of Australia’s copyright law which apply to family historians and discusses ways we can comply with the law.
Knowing what we can freely use, without permission, in our family histories ensures that we are not infringing on the rights of others. For example, did you know that if you watch your grandmother make her secret pasta sauce, writing down the ingredients and methods she used, you have created your own ‘literary work’ which is now protected by copyright? (Just don’t tell Granny!) How then does copyright law apply to published and unpublished works? What is fair use and moral rights? Can a distant cousin use information in her family book that I have researched? This presentation will examine those aspects of Australia’s copyright law which apply to family historians and discusses ways we can comply with the law.
Wed, December 6 2023: 1:00 UTC

Featured Webinars

View all (1,913)
1:30:29
501 views
CC
Lloyd’s of London: its history and its records for shipping
Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.
Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.
Wed, December 7 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:15:08
651 views
CC
Tips & Tricks for Researching in Australian Archives
This presentation explains how to search online archive catalogues for maximum results. Just one letter can mean that researchers will not find what they are looking for. Searching variant names and places is critical and numerous examples will allow researchers to search more effectively in Australian online archive catalogues.
Shauna Hicks
This presentation explains how to search online archive catalogues for maximum results. Just one letter can mean that researchers will not find what they are looking for. Searching variant names and places is critical and numerous examples will allow researchers to search more effectively in Australian online archive catalogues.
Wed, November 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:05:28
667 views
CC
Encounters – Our Immigrant Ancestors
Learn about 19th and 20th century sources for finding your ancestors’ arrival in New Zealand.
Learn about 19th and 20th century sources for finding your ancestors’ arrival in New Zealand.
Wed, October 5 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:12:46
315 views
CC
Shackles, shekels and shrapnel: the exodus to the Southern seas
Changes in Britain post the 1776 War of Independence, along with Capt James Cook’s mapping of New Zealand (1769) and New South Wales (1770), led to convicts and marines being sent to Botany Bay in 1787. So began British migration to the Southern Seas. Factors driving various waves of migration (economic, political, family ties, adventure) will be discussed, along with the effects the British Diasporas had on the Aboriginal and Māori Communities and their environment. Tips on tracing those missing down-under branches of your tree will also be covered.
Changes in Britain post the 1776 War of Independence, along with Capt James Cook’s mapping of New Zealand (1769) and New South Wales (1770), led to convicts and marines being sent to Botany Bay in 1787. So began British migration to the Southern Seas. Factors driving various waves of migration (economic, political, family ties, adventure) will be discussed, along with the effects the British Diasporas had on the Aboriginal and Māori Communities and their environment. Tips on tracing those missing down-under branches of your tree will also be covered.
Wed, September 7 2022: 2:00 UTC
57:25
177 views
CC
Finding Mob: Researching Indigenous Australian Family History
Government Policy in Australia, particularly from Federation until the 1980s, meant that many Australians with indigenous roots have lost connection with family and community. Between adoption, state foster care, missions, hiding ethnicity, and relocation, it is often difficult to know where to start and haw to analyse records. This webinar will present how to start your research, looking at repositories, institutions, and community records that will assist, both indigenous specific and general, in compiling a genealogy or family history.
Government Policy in Australia, particularly from Federation until the 1980s, meant that many Australians with indigenous roots have lost connection with family and community. Between adoption, state foster care, missions, hiding ethnicity, and relocation, it is often difficult to know where to start and haw to analyse records. This webinar will present how to start your research, looking at repositories, institutions, and community records that will assist, both indigenous specific and general, in compiling a genealogy or family history.
Wed, August 3 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:16:46
1.1K views
CC
The Madness of ‘Mc’ Surnames
If you have already worked out that ‘Mc’ and ‘Mac’ surnames are the most complicated British surnames, you must listen to this webinar. And if you haven’t already worked this out, you must absolutely listen to this webinar. ‘Mc’ surnames are double the trouble because they can suffer distortions at the beginning, middle and end of the ‘Mc’ prefix as well as at the beginning, middle and end of the rest of the surname, the root word. Sound glides are a particular problem, in which the ‘k’ sound at the end of the ‘Mc’ prefix distorts the first letter of the root word (e.g. McCue/McKew/McHugh, McLachlan/McGloughlan). Transcription errors can also produce a non-‘Mc’ surname (e.g. Mackever/Markever) which can prove a trap for the unwary. This seminar will help you keep you sane when you encounter the complexities of these mad Scottish-origin surnames.
If you have already worked out that ‘Mc’ and ‘Mac’ surnames are the most complicated British surnames, you must listen to this webinar. And if you haven’t already worked this out, you must absolutely listen to this webinar. ‘Mc’ surnames are double the trouble because they can suffer distortions at the beginning, middle and end of the ‘Mc’ prefix as well as at the beginning, middle and end of the rest of the surname, the root word. Sound glides are a particular problem, in which the ‘k’ sound at the end of the ‘Mc’ prefix distorts the first letter of the root word (e.g. McCue/McKew/McHugh, McLachlan/McGloughlan). Transcription errors can also produce a non-‘Mc’ surname (e.g. Mackever/Markever) which can prove a trap for the unwary. This seminar will help you keep you sane when you encounter the complexities of these mad Scottish-origin surnames.
Wed, July 6 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:07:16
561 views
CC
Government Gazettes as a Genealogical Resource
The Gazettes were the weekly notices of Government activities meant for other government departments and some were available to the public. They are an untapped genealogical resource. The general gazette lists government appointments, various licences, Justices of the Peace, changes to legislation, deceased estates, and so much more. Police Gazettes (only available to Police departments) list police officer movements, reports of crime often listing victims, reports on entry and exit from prison, Missing Friends notices while Education Gazettes list teacher movements, school information and more. Each colony had its own Gazettes and post Federation in 1901 the Commonwealth also produced a Government Gazette.
The Gazettes were the weekly notices of Government activities meant for other government departments and some were available to the public. They are an untapped genealogical resource. The general gazette lists government appointments, various licences, Justices of the Peace, changes to legislation, deceased estates, and so much more. Police Gazettes (only available to Police departments) list police officer movements, reports of crime often listing victims, reports on entry and exit from prison, Missing Friends notices while Education Gazettes list teacher movements, school information and more. Each colony had its own Gazettes and post Federation in 1901 the Commonwealth also produced a Government Gazette.
Wed, June 8 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:06:00
373 views
CC
The Bones – New Zealand Civil Registration
Birth, Marriage and Death information provides the bones of our family history skeleton from which we hang the rest of our research about a person. Learn more about the New Zealand records that give your research structure.
Birth, Marriage and Death information provides the bones of our family history skeleton from which we hang the rest of our research about a person. Learn more about the New Zealand records that give your research structure.
Wed, June 1 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:00:56
553 views
CC
My Top 20 Free Australian Genealogy Websites
This presentation examines free Australian websites useful for genealogy including BDMs, government archives, libraries, local government, and specialist websites in all States and Territories. Using these websites will allow researchers to start building a family tree or to look for someone who may have disappeared down under.
Shauna Hicks
This presentation examines free Australian websites useful for genealogy including BDMs, government archives, libraries, local government, and specialist websites in all States and Territories. Using these websites will allow researchers to start building a family tree or to look for someone who may have disappeared down under.
Wed, April 6 2022: 2:00 UTC