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1:30:29
270 views
Free
Lloyd’s of London: its history and its records for shipping
Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.
Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.
Wed, December 7 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:15:08
600 views
CC
Tips & Tricks for Researching in Australian Archives
This presentation explains how to search online archive catalogues for maximum results. Just one letter can mean that researchers will not find what they are looking for. Searching variant names and places is critical and numerous examples will allow researchers to search more effectively in Australian online archive catalogues.
Shauna Hicks
This presentation explains how to search online archive catalogues for maximum results. Just one letter can mean that researchers will not find what they are looking for. Searching variant names and places is critical and numerous examples will allow researchers to search more effectively in Australian online archive catalogues.
Wed, November 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:05:28
657 views
CC
Encounters – Our Immigrant Ancestors
Learn about 19th and 20th century sources for finding your ancestors’ arrival in New Zealand.
Learn about 19th and 20th century sources for finding your ancestors’ arrival in New Zealand.
Wed, October 5 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:12:46
310 views
CC
Shackles, shekels and shrapnel: the exodus to the Southern seas
Changes in Britain post the 1776 War of Independence, along with Capt James Cook’s mapping of New Zealand (1769) and New South Wales (1770), led to convicts and marines being sent to Botany Bay in 1787. So began British migration to the Southern Seas. Factors driving various waves of migration (economic, political, family ties, adventure) will be discussed, along with the effects the British Diasporas had on the Aboriginal and Māori Communities and their environment. Tips on tracing those missing down-under branches of your tree will also be covered.
Changes in Britain post the 1776 War of Independence, along with Capt James Cook’s mapping of New Zealand (1769) and New South Wales (1770), led to convicts and marines being sent to Botany Bay in 1787. So began British migration to the Southern Seas. Factors driving various waves of migration (economic, political, family ties, adventure) will be discussed, along with the effects the British Diasporas had on the Aboriginal and Māori Communities and their environment. Tips on tracing those missing down-under branches of your tree will also be covered.
Wed, September 7 2022: 2:00 UTC
57:25
176 views
CC
Finding Mob: Researching Indigenous Australian Family History
Government Policy in Australia, particularly from Federation until the 1980s, meant that many Australians with indigenous roots have lost connection with family and community. Between adoption, state foster care, missions, hiding ethnicity, and relocation, it is often difficult to know where to start and haw to analyse records. This webinar will present how to start your research, looking at repositories, institutions, and community records that will assist, both indigenous specific and general, in compiling a genealogy or family history.
Government Policy in Australia, particularly from Federation until the 1980s, meant that many Australians with indigenous roots have lost connection with family and community. Between adoption, state foster care, missions, hiding ethnicity, and relocation, it is often difficult to know where to start and haw to analyse records. This webinar will present how to start your research, looking at repositories, institutions, and community records that will assist, both indigenous specific and general, in compiling a genealogy or family history.
Wed, August 3 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:16:46
1.1K views
CC
The Madness of ‘Mc’ Surnames
If you have already worked out that ‘Mc’ and ‘Mac’ surnames are the most complicated British surnames, you must listen to this webinar. And if you haven’t already worked this out, you must absolutely listen to this webinar. ‘Mc’ surnames are double the trouble because they can suffer distortions at the beginning, middle and end of the ‘Mc’ prefix as well as at the beginning, middle and end of the rest of the surname, the root word. Sound glides are a particular problem, in which the ‘k’ sound at the end of the ‘Mc’ prefix distorts the first letter of the root word (e.g. McCue/McKew/McHugh, McLachlan/McGloughlan). Transcription errors can also produce a non-‘Mc’ surname (e.g. Mackever/Markever) which can prove a trap for the unwary. This seminar will help you keep you sane when you encounter the complexities of these mad Scottish-origin surnames.
If you have already worked out that ‘Mc’ and ‘Mac’ surnames are the most complicated British surnames, you must listen to this webinar. And if you haven’t already worked this out, you must absolutely listen to this webinar. ‘Mc’ surnames are double the trouble because they can suffer distortions at the beginning, middle and end of the ‘Mc’ prefix as well as at the beginning, middle and end of the rest of the surname, the root word. Sound glides are a particular problem, in which the ‘k’ sound at the end of the ‘Mc’ prefix distorts the first letter of the root word (e.g. McCue/McKew/McHugh, McLachlan/McGloughlan). Transcription errors can also produce a non-‘Mc’ surname (e.g. Mackever/Markever) which can prove a trap for the unwary. This seminar will help you keep you sane when you encounter the complexities of these mad Scottish-origin surnames.
Wed, July 6 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:07:16
560 views
CC
Government Gazettes as a Genealogical Resource
The Gazettes were the weekly notices of Government activities meant for other government departments and some were available to the public. They are an untapped genealogical resource. The general gazette lists government appointments, various licences, Justices of the Peace, changes to legislation, deceased estates, and so much more. Police Gazettes (only available to Police departments) list police officer movements, reports of crime often listing victims, reports on entry and exit from prison, Missing Friends notices while Education Gazettes list teacher movements, school information and more. Each colony had its own Gazettes and post Federation in 1901 the Commonwealth also produced a Government Gazette.
The Gazettes were the weekly notices of Government activities meant for other government departments and some were available to the public. They are an untapped genealogical resource. The general gazette lists government appointments, various licences, Justices of the Peace, changes to legislation, deceased estates, and so much more. Police Gazettes (only available to Police departments) list police officer movements, reports of crime often listing victims, reports on entry and exit from prison, Missing Friends notices while Education Gazettes list teacher movements, school information and more. Each colony had its own Gazettes and post Federation in 1901 the Commonwealth also produced a Government Gazette.
Wed, June 8 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:06:00
368 views
CC
The Bones – New Zealand Civil Registration
Birth, Marriage and Death information provides the bones of our family history skeleton from which we hang the rest of our research about a person. Learn more about the New Zealand records that give your research structure.
Birth, Marriage and Death information provides the bones of our family history skeleton from which we hang the rest of our research about a person. Learn more about the New Zealand records that give your research structure.
Wed, June 1 2022: 2:00 UTC
1:00:56
546 views
CC
My Top 20 Free Australian Genealogy Websites
This presentation examines free Australian websites useful for genealogy including BDMs, government archives, libraries, local government, and specialist websites in all States and Territories. Using these websites will allow researchers to start building a family tree or to look for someone who may have disappeared down under.
Shauna Hicks
This presentation examines free Australian websites useful for genealogy including BDMs, government archives, libraries, local government, and specialist websites in all States and Territories. Using these websites will allow researchers to start building a family tree or to look for someone who may have disappeared down under.
Wed, April 6 2022: 2:00 UTC