1,772 Webinars
Sort by
Sort by
1:25:50
300 views
Free
Finding Your Delaware Ancestors
Nestled along the Eastern seaboard of the US, Delaware has a long history. From Native Americans, arrival of Europeans in 1609, boundary disputes and immigration, to migration to near and distant locations, Delaware’s history affects how to find your ancestors. Learn when records became available and where to find them to research your roots in the First State.
Nestled along the Eastern seaboard of the US, Delaware has a long history. From Native Americans, arrival of Europeans in 1609, boundary disputes and immigration, to migration to near and distant locations, Delaware’s history affects how to find your ancestors. Learn when records became available and where to find them to research your roots in the First State.
Thu, May 12 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:14:41
814 views
Free
Drawing Insights from Your Family Photos: Using MyHeritage
Old family photos can give you so much more information than just what your ancestor looked like. Learn how to organize your photos and take advantage of the many photo tools that MyHeritage provides.
Old family photos can give you so much more information than just what your ancestor looked like. Learn how to organize your photos and take advantage of the many photo tools that MyHeritage provides.
Tue, May 10 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:20:49
369 views
CC
McMasters’ Will: The Scheme That Made Us Virtually Free
Calvin Dark presents the story of his Great-Great Grandfather, Aaron McMasters, born enslaved around 1814 in North Carolina. When he was 20 years old, he convinced his master and biological father, Simeon McMasters, to free him but North Carolina law wouldn’t allow it. This presentation will shed light on aspects of slavery (including manumission, emancipation, anti-slavery vs. abolitionist groups, Underground Railroad, Quakers, and Black Codes), Reconstruction, and African American history in North Carolina that are lesser-known and largely omitted from mainstream teaching and discourse about the period. The presentation will also provide tips and lessons learned for using genetic genealogy to uncover and discover valuable family history.
Calvin Dark presents the story of his Great-Great Grandfather, Aaron McMasters, born enslaved around 1814 in North Carolina. When he was 20 years old, he convinced his master and biological father, Simeon McMasters, to free him but North Carolina law wouldn’t allow it. This presentation will shed light on aspects of slavery (including manumission, emancipation, anti-slavery vs. abolitionist groups, Underground Railroad, Quakers, and Black Codes), Reconstruction, and African American history in North Carolina that are lesser-known and largely omitted from mainstream teaching and discourse about the period. The presentation will also provide tips and lessons learned for using genetic genealogy to uncover and discover valuable family history.
Fri, May 6 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:21:31
3.2K views
CC
Quickly Organize Your DNA Matches with the Leeds Method
When you take an autosomal DNA test, you get a list of people who share DNA with you because you share common ancestors. The Leeds Method uses Shared Matching to create colorful groups of these matches. Each group is likely related to you through one part of your family, and many people get four groups based on their four grandparent lines. This method is based on DNA, not trees, so it is also often effective in cases of unknown parentage. This presentation will help you create a Leeds Method chart, understand your results, and use that chart to learn more about your family tree.
When you take an autosomal DNA test, you get a list of people who share DNA with you because you share common ancestors. The Leeds Method uses Shared Matching to create colorful groups of these matches. Each group is likely related to you through one part of your family, and many people get four groups based on their four grandparent lines. This method is based on DNA, not trees, so it is also often effective in cases of unknown parentage. This presentation will help you create a Leeds Method chart, understand your results, and use that chart to learn more about your family tree.
Wed, May 4 2022: 18:00 UTC
5:27
534 views
CC
Free
Legacy QuickTip: How to make a list of ancestors in Legacy from ___________?
Join Legacy’s Geoff Rasmussen as he uses the Legacy Family Tree software to demonstrate how to create a list of ancestors who lived in a certain place.
Join Legacy’s Geoff Rasmussen as he uses the Legacy Family Tree software to demonstrate how to create a list of ancestors who lived in a certain place.
Tue, May 3 2022: 0:00 UTC
Advanced
1:24:45
2.1K views
CC
Wringing Every Drop out of Mitochondrial DNA
We will learn step by step, how to utilize mitochondrial DNA testing at Family Tree DNA to get the most out of your results. We’ll look at little known methods to obtain information, even if your match doesn’t have a tree. We’ll talk about using resources such as Geni, WikiTree and others to break down mitochondrial brick walls. Lastly, we’ll discuss projects and using mitochondrial DNA in conjunction with autosomal for a slam-dunk.
We will learn step by step, how to utilize mitochondrial DNA testing at Family Tree DNA to get the most out of your results. We’ll look at little known methods to obtain information, even if your match doesn’t have a tree. We’ll talk about using resources such as Geni, WikiTree and others to break down mitochondrial brick walls. Lastly, we’ll discuss projects and using mitochondrial DNA in conjunction with autosomal for a slam-dunk.
Wed, April 27 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:05:02
655 views
Free
Different Ways to View Your Tree at MyHeritage
There are many ways to visualize your family tree, each with its own unique advantages. Learn about the different tree views on MyHeritage and how using them helps you paint a more complete picture of your family tree.
There are many ways to visualize your family tree, each with its own unique advantages. Learn about the different tree views on MyHeritage and how using them helps you paint a more complete picture of your family tree.
Tue, April 26 2022: 18:00 UTC
48:52
47 views
French
Free
Découvrir la vie de nos ancêtres (militaires et civils) en 14-18
La Première Guerre mondiale a marqué la vie de nos ancêtres, mais a également laissé des traces dans de nombreuses sources d’archives. Découvrez dans ce webinaire comment rechercher et exploiter ces documents, afin de retracer le parcours de vos ancêtres durant la Grande Guerre, qu’ils soient militaires ou civils.
La Première Guerre mondiale a marqué la vie de nos ancêtres, mais a également laissé des traces dans de nombreuses sources d’archives. Découvrez dans ce webinaire comment rechercher et exploiter ces documents, afin de retracer le parcours de vos ancêtres durant la Grande Guerre, qu’ils soient militaires ou civils.
Tue, April 26 2022: 12:00 UTC
37:31
334 views
CC
3 Clues Found in Every Land Record
Land records are often the key to resolving difficult families, where there is movement and migration. Make sure you are listening to the records by reviewing the basic clues in every land transaction.
Land records are often the key to resolving difficult families, where there is movement and migration. Make sure you are listening to the records by reviewing the basic clues in every land transaction.
Sat, April 23 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:14:27
862 views
CC
Unlocking Stories of Our Female Ancestors through Effective Research Methodology
We will explore how implementing standard research methodology may open up new avenues of discovery to unlock previously “hidden” evidence of female ancestors’ stories. Using reasonably exhaustive research, evidence correlation, analysis proof standard elements and cluster research methodology, we can uncover critical information to help us develop our female ancestors’ stories. Today’s discussion includes two case studies of females born in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An exploration of sources, beyond census and marriage records, was required to enhance their life stories. One subject was born into an affluent family who settled in north central Tennessee, and the second was enslaved from birth until Emancipation in western Kentucky.
We will explore how implementing standard research methodology may open up new avenues of discovery to unlock previously “hidden” evidence of female ancestors’ stories. Using reasonably exhaustive research, evidence correlation, analysis proof standard elements and cluster research methodology, we can uncover critical information to help us develop our female ancestors’ stories. Today’s discussion includes two case studies of females born in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An exploration of sources, beyond census and marriage records, was required to enhance their life stories. One subject was born into an affluent family who settled in north central Tennessee, and the second was enslaved from birth until Emancipation in western Kentucky.
Wed, April 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:10:04
Proving Parentage Two Centuries Later Using DNA Evidence
Proving immigrant origins may seem daunting, especially when the family lived hundreds of years ago. This presentation shows how to navigate multiple border crossings, name changes, and cultural challenges and apply DNA techniques to trace a family of Canadian immigrants from town to town. The right combination of documentary evidence and biological evidence, coupled with sound methodology, reveals the origins of this family.
Proving immigrant origins may seem daunting, especially when the family lived hundreds of years ago. This presentation shows how to navigate multiple border crossings, name changes, and cultural challenges and apply DNA techniques to trace a family of Canadian immigrants from town to town. The right combination of documentary evidence and biological evidence, coupled with sound methodology, reveals the origins of this family.
Wed, April 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:17:35
470 views
CC
Expelled from Nova Scotia: Researching the Acadian Diaspora to the Colonies
In 1750 nearly 7000 Acadian settlers of Nova Scotia were summarily rounded up, boarded onto ships and sent southward to the American Colonies. The colonies to which they were sent had little or no warning of the refugees imminent arrival. This webinar reviews the unique political and social environments of each receiving colony, the fate of the Acadians once landed, and describes where the researcher can find clues about their ancestor in the records of each colony.
Ann Lawthers
In 1750 nearly 7000 Acadian settlers of Nova Scotia were summarily rounded up, boarded onto ships and sent southward to the American Colonies. The colonies to which they were sent had little or no warning of the refugees imminent arrival. This webinar reviews the unique political and social environments of each receiving colony, the fate of the Acadians once landed, and describes where the researcher can find clues about their ancestor in the records of each colony.
Fri, April 15 2022: 18:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (82)
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Five Wives & A Feather Bed: Using Indirect and Negative Evidence to Resolve Conflicting Claims
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Indirect Evidence – A Case Study
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Fri, May 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
Working More In-Depth with Mexican Civil Registrations
Fri, May 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
Mexico implemented federal registration of births, marriages, and deaths in the 1860s. These records are packed with genealogical information about your ancestors. This presentation will help you make the most of understanding and analyzing these records.
Mexico implemented federal registration of births, marriages, and deaths in the 1860s. These records are packed with genealogical information about your ancestors. This presentation will help you make the most of understanding and analyzing these records.
Fri, May 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
Tue, May 24 2022: 11:00 UTC
French
1939-1945, parcours de prisonniers de guerre
Tue, May 24 2022: 11:00 UTC
Quand un généalogiste se lance dans des recherches sur un combattant français de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, il est souvent amené à travailler sur un profil de prisonnier de guerre. C’est presque une affaire de statistiques, avec plus de 1,8 million de soldats capturés par les forces allemandes entre mai et juin 1940 ! La recherche prend alors une tournure particulière. Ce moment de la vie du combattant stimule la curiosité de son descendant. Et, ce qui n’est pas le moindre paradoxe, le généalogiste a parfois connu l’ancien prisonnier de guerre. Il a écouté les récits de son père, de son grand-père, il en a collecté les anecdotes. Mais une fois que le principal témoin a disparu, il se rend compte qu’il lui manque des données précises pour documenter cette histoire individuelle transmise dans l’intimité familiale. Heureusement les archives existent. Elles permettent de compléter les précieux souvenirs. Ce webinaire a pour but de recenser les sources, qui sont variées. Et, à partir de cet inventaire, il s’agira d’envisager les méthodes de recherche, et les conditions de consultation, en fonction des configurations.
Quand un généalogiste se lance dans des recherches sur un combattant français de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, il est souvent amené à travailler sur un profil de prisonnier de guerre. C’est presque une affaire de statistiques, avec plus de 1,8 million de soldats capturés par les forces allemandes entre mai et juin 1940 ! La recherche prend alors une tournure particulière. Ce moment de la vie du combattant stimule la curiosité de son descendant. Et, ce qui n’est pas le moindre paradoxe, le généalogiste a parfois connu l’ancien prisonnier de guerre. Il a écouté les récits de son père, de son grand-père, il en a collecté les anecdotes. Mais une fois que le principal témoin a disparu, il se rend compte qu’il lui manque des données précises pour documenter cette histoire individuelle transmise dans l’intimité familiale. Heureusement les archives existent. Elles permettent de compléter les précieux souvenirs. Ce webinaire a pour but de recenser les sources, qui sont variées. Et, à partir de cet inventaire, il s’agira d’envisager les méthodes de recherche, et les conditions de consultation, en fonction des configurations.
Tue, May 24 2022: 11:00 UTC
Tue, May 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
Jump-starting Your 1950 Census Research with Census Helper™
Tue, May 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
Ready to explore the newly released 1950 U.S. Census records? MyHeritage’s free Census Helper™ tool is the perfect place to start. Uri Gonen, SVP Product Manager at MyHeritage, will introduce you to this handy tool he developed and show you how to use it to organize and focus your census research.
Ready to explore the newly released 1950 U.S. Census records? MyHeritage’s free Census Helper™ tool is the perfect place to start. Uri Gonen, SVP Product Manager at MyHeritage, will introduce you to this handy tool he developed and show you how to use it to organize and focus your census research.
Tue, May 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, May 25 2022: 18:00 UTC
Seeking the Best Evidence: Targeted Testing for Genetic Genealogy Proof
Wed, May 25 2022: 18:00 UTC
According to the genealogical proof standard, part of pursuing thoroughly exhaustive research is seeking the best available evidence to address a research question. In genetic genealogy research problems, the evidence we use is the test results of living descendants of a research subject, and pursuing the best evidence requires targeted testing of those whose DNA is most likely to help address the research question. In this session, learn to identify, prioritize and invite the best testing candidates to address a research question.
According to the genealogical proof standard, part of pursuing thoroughly exhaustive research is seeking the best available evidence to address a research question. In genetic genealogy research problems, the evidence we use is the test results of living descendants of a research subject, and pursuing the best evidence requires targeted testing of those whose DNA is most likely to help address the research question. In this session, learn to identify, prioritize and invite the best testing candidates to address a research question.
Wed, May 25 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, June 1 2022: 2:00 UTC
The Bones – New Zealand Civil Registration
Wed, June 1 2022: 2:00 UTC
Birth, Marriage and Death information provides the bones of our family history skeleton from which we hang the rest of our research about a person. Learn more about the New Zealand records that give your research structure.
Birth, Marriage and Death information provides the bones of our family history skeleton from which we hang the rest of our research about a person. Learn more about the New Zealand records that give your research structure.
Wed, June 1 2022: 2:00 UTC
Wed, June 1 2022: 18:00 UTC
Using DNA To Solve Interlinked Mysteries
Wed, June 1 2022: 18:00 UTC
Sometimes when trying to solve family mysteries using DNA, we discover that the best matches on the mystery line also have recent mysteries of their own and the connection between the two lies on their respective mystery lines. It’s exciting when there are close DNA matches on a mystery line but, equally, it can be frustrating if those matches also have recent blanks or brick walls and it’s tempting to treat these kinds of matches as dead ends. In this presentation, Michelle will outline some extraordinary case studies where multiple mysteries linked together and only by investigating them all could answers ultimately be uncovered. She will demonstrate the best techniques for navigating these tricky situations and provide her top hints and tips for working with interlinked mysteries. Often if you can solve one interlinked mystery, you can solve them all!
Sometimes when trying to solve family mysteries using DNA, we discover that the best matches on the mystery line also have recent mysteries of their own and the connection between the two lies on their respective mystery lines. It’s exciting when there are close DNA matches on a mystery line but, equally, it can be frustrating if those matches also have recent blanks or brick walls and it’s tempting to treat these kinds of matches as dead ends. In this presentation, Michelle will outline some extraordinary case studies where multiple mysteries linked together and only by investigating them all could answers ultimately be uncovered. She will demonstrate the best techniques for navigating these tricky situations and provide her top hints and tips for working with interlinked mysteries. Often if you can solve one interlinked mystery, you can solve them all!
Wed, June 1 2022: 18:00 UTC
Fri, June 3 2022: 18:00 UTC
Studying Free People of Color in Apprentice Records
Fri, June 3 2022: 18:00 UTC
This lecture will discuss the institution of apprenticeship – documents, laws, and resources relating to free people of color before the Civil War.
This lecture will discuss the institution of apprenticeship – documents, laws, and resources relating to free people of color before the Civil War.
Fri, June 3 2022: 18:00 UTC