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Historical Records

Watch webinars that focus on specific record categories including adoption, vital records, cemetery records, census records, city directories, immigration records, newspapers and more for locations around the world.

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56:19
151 views
CC
Getting the Most out of the Irish Census
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
Sat, November 27 2021: 0:00 UTC
56:25
Fire, Water, and the 1890 U.S. Census: Researching Beyond the Ashes and Mold
Most genealogists are aware the 1890 federal census was destroyed by fire in 1921. Learn the story behind this historical and genealogical tragedy and how to research around the loss of that precious record.
Most genealogists are aware the 1890 federal census was destroyed by fire in 1921. Learn the story behind this historical and genealogical tragedy and how to research around the loss of that precious record.
Wed, August 25 2021: 18:00 UTC
1:24:32
They Had Names: Identifying Children Represented by Tick Marks in Pre-1850 Censuses
Early nineteenth century censuses represented children in a household with nameless tick marks in gender and age categories. Their identities can be discovered despite the absence of birth records by using the tick marks to determine an approximate birth year then build an exhaustively researched FAN for the head of…
Early nineteenth century censuses represented children in a household with nameless tick marks in gender and age categories. Their identities can be discovered despite the absence of birth records by using the tick marks to determine an approximate birth year then build an exhaustively researched FAN for the head of…
Tue, June 15 2021: 0:00 UTC
45:58
9.2K views
CC
The Coded Census: Deciphering US Census
Specifically we’ll cover the 1910 to 1950 US Census Population Schedules and the various codes employed. In addition, we’ll review the various census enumerator instructions to determine other notations and marks on the population schedules.
Specifically we’ll cover the 1910 to 1950 US Census Population Schedules and the various codes employed. In addition, we’ll review the various census enumerator instructions to determine other notations and marks on the population schedules.
Fri, March 13 2020: 0:00 UTC
1:18:09
More Than Just Names: Advanced US Census Research
Those every-10-years U.S. censuses are goldmines of names, ages and birthplaces for members of our families. But there's so much more in the census records if we know where to look: everything from socioeconomic status to crops grown or products made, from school attendance to marriage dates, from physical disabilities…
Those every-10-years U.S. censuses are goldmines of names, ages and birthplaces for members of our families. But there's so much more in the census records if we know where to look: everything from socioeconomic status to crops grown or products made, from school attendance to marriage dates, from physical disabilities…
Fri, January 31 2020: 0:00 UTC
1:20:06
8.5K views
CC
Census Hurdles: How to Jump Over or Go Around
This program shares some tips and tricks for overcoming common and uncommon census research obstacles. Cari will cover topics such as language barriers, literacy, indexing errors, imaging errors, errors (accidental), and errors (intentional). Using examples, she will demonstrate each of these issues and suggest solutions for overcoming them.
This program shares some tips and tricks for overcoming common and uncommon census research obstacles. Cari will cover topics such as language barriers, literacy, indexing errors, imaging errors, errors (accidental), and errors (intentional). Using examples, she will demonstrate each of these issues and suggest solutions for overcoming them.
Fri, July 26 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:24:56
8.9K views
CC
Free
Censuses Around the World: What You Need to Know About Census Collections and Genealogy
Explore the incredible census collections we have in the MyHeritage database (U.S., Canada, England, Wales, Ireland, Denmark, etc.) and how you can integrate them into your family history research.
Explore the incredible census collections we have in the MyHeritage database (U.S., Canada, England, Wales, Ireland, Denmark, etc.) and how you can integrate them into your family history research.
Tue, April 23 2019: 0:00 UTC
40:21
2.1K views
CC
Secrets of the US Federal Census – How Did Enumeration Really Work?
Learn the fascinating journey of US census data from the census planning phase to the final tabulation.
Learn the fascinating journey of US census data from the census planning phase to the final tabulation.
Fri, November 16 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:38:56
2.4K views
Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence
We are familiar with the decennial censuses, but the non-population schedules can also provide evidence and context for your family history. Using basic analytical skills and correlating tools, we will investigate five different records sets which shed light on many aspects of our ancestors lives and enrich our stories of…
We are familiar with the decennial censuses, but the non-population schedules can also provide evidence and context for your family history. Using basic analytical skills and correlating tools, we will investigate five different records sets which shed light on many aspects of our ancestors lives and enrich our stories of…
Fri, November 10 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:38:16
Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records
Many Midwestern and Plains states have superb state census records. Learn about the indexes, the many personal details these censuses include, locating the censuses, and alternate sources. The lecture includes many specific examples from these enumerations, provides an overview of state censuses for Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri�
Many Midwestern and Plains states have superb state census records. Learn about the indexes, the many personal details these censuses include, locating the censuses, and alternate sources. The lecture includes many specific examples from these enumerations, provides an overview of state censuses for Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri�
Wed, October 25 2017: 0:00 UTC
51:59
4.1K views
Secrets and Clues Hidden in the 1790 – 1840 U.S. Censuses
The U.S. has taken a federal census since 1790 and they have been invaluable to our genealogy research. However, there are secrets hiding in each one. From hidden second pages to the phantom male, this lecture covers little known facts about each of the U.S. censuses from 1790 to 1840.
The U.S. has taken a federal census since 1790 and they have been invaluable to our genealogy research. However, there are secrets hiding in each one. From hidden second pages to the phantom male, this lecture covers little known facts about each of the U.S. censuses from 1790 to 1840.
Mon, August 7 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:05:25
2.2K views
1850 1900 U.S. Federal Census Secrets Revealed
Learn the many hidden treasures found in the U.S. censuses between 1850 and 1900. There were different types of schedules by this time, including population schedules, slave schedules, and mortality schedules. Understanding the differences, the rules of enumerators, and little known facts will lead you to clues in your research.
Learn the many hidden treasures found in the U.S. censuses between 1850 and 1900. There were different types of schedules by this time, including population schedules, slave schedules, and mortality schedules. Understanding the differences, the rules of enumerators, and little known facts will lead you to clues in your research.
Mon, August 7 2017: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (110)
Wed, February 2 2022: 19:00 UTC
CensusGenie: Down to the Wire 1950 Census Prep
Wed, February 2 2022: 19:00 UTC
For over a year we’ve met monthly and are now ready to meet weekly in prep for the release of the 1950 US Federal Census. You can play catch up by joining Cousin Russ and Myrt and discover strategies for finding ancestors in an unindexed image collection.
For over a year we’ve met monthly and are now ready to meet weekly in prep for the release of the 1950 US Federal Census. You can play catch up by joining Cousin Russ and Myrt and discover strategies for finding ancestors in an unindexed image collection.
Wed, February 2 2022: 19:00 UTC
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Exploring the new 1921 UK Census
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Wed, May 25 2022: 18:00 UTC
The Staff of the U.S. Census
Wed, May 25 2022: 18:00 UTC
Just who was creating the documents genealogists typically turn to first? What rules did they follow? How long did they have to complete their job? How big is an enumeration district? These questions, and more, probably occur to anyone doing extensive research in the U.S. Census reports. This talk reviews the staffing, training, search for accuracy, penalties for non-cooperation, and bureaucracy of the U.S. Census from 1790 through 1950.
Just who was creating the documents genealogists typically turn to first? What rules did they follow? How long did they have to complete their job? How big is an enumeration district? These questions, and more, probably occur to anyone doing extensive research in the U.S. Census reports. This talk reviews the staffing, training, search for accuracy, penalties for non-cooperation, and bureaucracy of the U.S. Census from 1790 through 1950.
Wed, May 25 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, June 22 2022: 18:00 UTC
Irish Emigration to North America: Before, during and after Famine
Wed, June 22 2022: 18:00 UTC
Identify push factors to emigration (internal issues influencing emigration): Identify pull factors to emigration (external forces encouraging emigration) • Discuss factors and resources for each time period • Emigration pre-1717 • Scots-Irish (1717 – 1783) • Revolutionary War to the Famine (1783-1845) • Famine years and after • How to use to find places of origin
Identify push factors to emigration (internal issues influencing emigration): Identify pull factors to emigration (external forces encouraging emigration) • Discuss factors and resources for each time period • Emigration pre-1717 • Scots-Irish (1717 – 1783) • Revolutionary War to the Famine (1783-1845) • Famine years and after • How to use to find places of origin
Wed, June 22 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
A Deep Dive into the Map Collections of the Library of Congress
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Ancestors’ Religions in the U.S.
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Religious records are essential in genealogy research. Do you know all ancestors’ religions? Review the Protestant Reformation and religions in the U.S. Find your ancestor.
Religious records are essential in genealogy research. Do you know all ancestors’ religions? Review the Protestant Reformation and religions in the U.S. Find your ancestor.
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
African Americans Heading West
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
After the end of the Civil War in 1865, African Americans began leaving the areas where they had been enslaved. Many went to North to larger towns where work was more plentiful. But less discussed is that a number went West to farm, using the Homestead Act of 1862 to claim land of their own. Other settled in and helped develop some all-Black towns in Kansas and Oklahoma. Still others headed to the Pacific Coast for work. What can we find out about these settlers’ lives? Where can we find records?
After the end of the Civil War in 1865, African Americans began leaving the areas where they had been enslaved. Many went to North to larger towns where work was more plentiful. But less discussed is that a number went West to farm, using the Homestead Act of 1862 to claim land of their own. Other settled in and helped develop some all-Black towns in Kansas and Oklahoma. Still others headed to the Pacific Coast for work. What can we find out about these settlers’ lives? Where can we find records?
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 31 2022: 18:00 UTC
Direct Your Letters to San Jose: Following Ancestors’ Migration Trails
Wed, August 31 2022: 18:00 UTC
U.S. Migration patterns trended from the east to west coasts as Manifest Destiny played out in our American ancestors’ lives. Did they write letters? Yes, they did. Did they keep a diary? Likely. But, have those documents survived, and if so where might they be located? Follow through historical documents the 100+year Westward Migration of one family who created, saved, and handed down pertinent historical documents pinpointing their migration from Kentucky to Illinois in the early 1830s, chronicled an overland journey to the California Gold Rush 20 years later in 1850, then later emigrated from Illinois to Kansas in the early days of the Civil War. Discover what brought one descendant to Kansas City, Missouri, after World War II. Where’s their next stop? This case study is studded with potential research avenues for any genealogist, anthropologist, archivist, cartographer, or automobile enthusiast.
U.S. Migration patterns trended from the east to west coasts as Manifest Destiny played out in our American ancestors’ lives. Did they write letters? Yes, they did. Did they keep a diary? Likely. But, have those documents survived, and if so where might they be located? Follow through historical documents the 100+year Westward Migration of one family who created, saved, and handed down pertinent historical documents pinpointing their migration from Kentucky to Illinois in the early 1830s, chronicled an overland journey to the California Gold Rush 20 years later in 1850, then later emigrated from Illinois to Kansas in the early days of the Civil War. Discover what brought one descendant to Kansas City, Missouri, after World War II. Where’s their next stop? This case study is studded with potential research avenues for any genealogist, anthropologist, archivist, cartographer, or automobile enthusiast.
Wed, August 31 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, October 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Colonial Migrations to 1770
Wed, October 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Before the Revolutionary War, geography, topography and a strong indigenous people presence shaped migration patterns. This webinar covers the dominant push-pull forces and challenges for colonial migration. Using maps and other graphics, the major migration routes by region will be described: New England, mid-Atlantic and southward from Virginia. Famous paths such as the Kings Highway, the Great Valley Road, and the Fall Line Road as well as less well-known paths such as the Greenwood Path and the Forbidden Path will be covered. Using a set of case studies, the process of locating clues in local histories, land records, and vital records is unfolded.
Ann Lawthers
Before the Revolutionary War, geography, topography and a strong indigenous people presence shaped migration patterns. This webinar covers the dominant push-pull forces and challenges for colonial migration. Using maps and other graphics, the major migration routes by region will be described: New England, mid-Atlantic and southward from Virginia. Famous paths such as the Kings Highway, the Great Valley Road, and the Fall Line Road as well as less well-known paths such as the Greenwood Path and the Forbidden Path will be covered. Using a set of case studies, the process of locating clues in local histories, land records, and vital records is unfolded.
Wed, October 19 2022: 18:00 UTC