Renate Yarborough Sanders

Renate Yarborough Sanders is the descendant of formerly enslaved ancestors, enslavers, and free people of color. She authors two blogs: “Into the LIGHT” and “Genea-Related;” and produces a “(Mostly) African-American Funeral Programs” online database.

Renate is a member of the National Genealogical Society, the North Carolina Genealogical Society (Publicity Director), the Afro-American Genealogical and Historical Society (member of National Editorial Board and Vice-President and Newsletter Editor for the Hampton Roads Chapter), and several North Carolina local societies. She is also a member of the lineage society, “Sons and Daughters of the United States Middle Passage.” Renate cohosts “Let’s Talk North Carolina Genealogy,” an online platform and YouTube show, presenting genealogy programing and virtual events for North Carolina researchers; and she has served as panelist and guest on numerous web shows and podcasts. Renate has provided genealogy education for George Washington’s Mount Vernon, Norfolk State University, The College of William and Mary and for NASA. Her research has been featured on PBS Radio and in a National Geographic cover story and podcast. Renate provides coaching and consultation services for clients seeking assistance with genealogical research and continues to engage in project work for various organizations and institutions.

Renate lectures on a variety of genealogy topics but specializes in teaching beginning to intermediate research methodology and sharing specific techniques for researching ancestors of color – both pre- and post-Emancipation. She is a retired elementary school educator, mother of two daughters, and grandmother of four beautiful granddaughters (and a grand dog).

Renate's Upcoming Live Webinars (1)

Fri, April 5 2024: 18:00 UTC
From This Day Forward – Documenting Marital Unions of Enslaved and Emancipated Persons
Fri, April 5 2024: 18:00 UTC
Despite the fact that their marriages were not legally recognized before 1865, enslaved couples were uniting in "quasi-marital" relationships, and were cohabitating as husband and wife, as evidenced by many extant documents created during and after the end of America’s Civil War. In this presentation, we explore examples of documents that provide evidence of these relationships, and sources for finding them.
Despite the fact that their marriages were not legally recognized before 1865, enslaved couples were uniting in "quasi-marital" relationships, and were cohabitating as husband and wife, as evidenced by many extant documents created during and after the end of America’s Civil War. In this presentation, we explore examples of documents that provide evidence of these relationships, and sources for finding them.
Fri, April 5 2024: 18:00 UTC

Renate's Webinars (5)