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Fri, May 3 2024: 18:00 UTC
Researching in Kent
Fri, May 3 2024: 18:00 UTC
Kent, known as the Garden of England, has a wealth of genealogical records but locating those records can take some investigation, with records divided between at least three archives. Then, some parishes that were formally in Kent were absorbed into Greater London, adding another four archives into the mix. Genealogical research can be done knowing when and where the records can be accessed.
Kent, known as the Garden of England, has a wealth of genealogical records but locating those records can take some investigation, with records divided between at least three archives. Then, some parishes that were formally in Kent were absorbed into Greater London, adding another four archives into the mix. Genealogical research can be done knowing when and where the records can be accessed.
Fri, May 3 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, June 21 2024: 18:00 UTC
English Occupation, Apprenticeship and Guild Records
Fri, June 21 2024: 18:00 UTC
Learn about apprenticeship, freeman and guild records and how they controlled your ancestor’s trade. Identify sources to put your ancestor into a true occupational context.
Learn about apprenticeship, freeman and guild records and how they controlled your ancestor’s trade. Identify sources to put your ancestor into a true occupational context.
Fri, June 21 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, July 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Researching Cornish Ancestors
Fri, July 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Discover the key resources available for researching Cornish ancestry. Learn about the different archives in Cornwall, what they hold and how to access their collections. Find out which Cornish records are available online and where to find them. Hear about the finding aids and local groups that can help with your research, and get a better understanding of how key features of Cornish history like Methodism, mining and migration shaped Cornish family histories. Whether you are researching from afar or planning to visit Cornwall, this talk will help you with starting to research your Cornish ancestors. Please note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Discover the key resources available for researching Cornish ancestry. Learn about the different archives in Cornwall, what they hold and how to access their collections. Find out which Cornish records are available online and where to find them. Hear about the finding aids and local groups that can help with your research, and get a better understanding of how key features of Cornish history like Methodism, mining and migration shaped Cornish family histories. Whether you are researching from afar or planning to visit Cornwall, this talk will help you with starting to research your Cornish ancestors. Please note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Fri, July 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, September 6 2024: 18:00 UTC
Researching Your Birmingham Ancestors
Fri, September 6 2024: 18:00 UTC
Birmingham was the cradle of the Industrial Revolution and the world’s first manufacturing town. This talk will equip you to start your research on your Birmingham ancestors. Learn about the challenges of researching in Birmingham and discover the key archives and sources for genealogical records. Find out how key themes in the city’s history, such as migration, strong Roman Catholic and non-conformist traditions, and the rise of manufacturing, are reflected in genealogical records. Sources covered include legal and ecclesiastical archives, local government, business, institutions, societies and schools. Investigate where else you can get help for researching here such as the Family History Society. Note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Birmingham was the cradle of the Industrial Revolution and the world’s first manufacturing town. This talk will equip you to start your research on your Birmingham ancestors. Learn about the challenges of researching in Birmingham and discover the key archives and sources for genealogical records. Find out how key themes in the city’s history, such as migration, strong Roman Catholic and non-conformist traditions, and the rise of manufacturing, are reflected in genealogical records. Sources covered include legal and ecclesiastical archives, local government, business, institutions, societies and schools. Investigate where else you can get help for researching here such as the Family History Society. Note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Fri, September 6 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Luff In The Devon Cottages: Exploring A One-Place Study by Kirsty Gray
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Our ancestors were people, just like us. They were born, they lived, they died, they laughed, they cried, and they fell in love – or should that be luff…? Join people-finding wizard and genealogist Kirsty Gray on a journey through her one place study about the small Devon parishes of Luffincott and Tetcott; learn about the history of these villages, their inhabitants and their challenges, as Kirsty talks you through the trials and triumphs of conducting a one place study. This exploration of the past of a remote and rural part of Devon is sure to providing a fascinating window into the past and be a great example of the benefits conducting a one place study can bring.
Our ancestors were people, just like us. They were born, they lived, they died, they laughed, they cried, and they fell in love – or should that be luff…? Join people-finding wizard and genealogist Kirsty Gray on a journey through her one place study about the small Devon parishes of Luffincott and Tetcott; learn about the history of these villages, their inhabitants and their challenges, as Kirsty talks you through the trials and triumphs of conducting a one place study. This exploration of the past of a remote and rural part of Devon is sure to providing a fascinating window into the past and be a great example of the benefits conducting a one place study can bring.
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Fri, November 1 2024: 18:00 UTC
Researching Your Buckinghamshire Ancestors
Fri, November 1 2024: 18:00 UTC
Do you have ancestors from Buckinghamshire? If so, then this talk is for you. Join Richard Holt for a whistle-stop tour of the key resources available for research in this county. Our journey of discovery will cover the main archive and how to use their catalogue; along with some smaller archives as well. Find out about a number of online resources that will help you track down your ancestors and learn about their lives. Discover how jurisdictional boundaries might impact your research and how to discover the necessary information. Learn about the many societies, including family history societies, which you can turn to for more information and advice. At the end of our journey you will be equipped with the resources that will enable you to have greater success in your research.
Do you have ancestors from Buckinghamshire? If so, then this talk is for you. Join Richard Holt for a whistle-stop tour of the key resources available for research in this county. Our journey of discovery will cover the main archive and how to use their catalogue; along with some smaller archives as well. Find out about a number of online resources that will help you track down your ancestors and learn about their lives. Discover how jurisdictional boundaries might impact your research and how to discover the necessary information. Learn about the many societies, including family history societies, which you can turn to for more information and advice. At the end of our journey you will be equipped with the resources that will enable you to have greater success in your research.
Fri, November 1 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, December 4 2024: 1:00 UTC
Finding Your British WWI Soldier – Dead or Alive
Wed, December 4 2024: 1:00 UTC
New record images create the most complete set of records to identify the over 5.5 million soldiers served in the British Army during World War I. This is a large topic, but research has gotten easier during the last couple of years as original resources and indexes have become available online, and new finding aids have been created. This lecture examines what records were destroyed during WWII, what records survived along with how to use the new indexes, online originals and how to interpret them. Plus put the soldier’s actions into battle context.
New record images create the most complete set of records to identify the over 5.5 million soldiers served in the British Army during World War I. This is a large topic, but research has gotten easier during the last couple of years as original resources and indexes have become available online, and new finding aids have been created. This lecture examines what records were destroyed during WWII, what records survived along with how to use the new indexes, online originals and how to interpret them. Plus put the soldier’s actions into battle context.
Wed, December 4 2024: 1:00 UTC

Featured Webinars

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African American Research 101 – Reconstruction Era (Part 2 of 3)
This lecture will discuss how to get started in African American research. The objective of this presentation will be to research either a free person of color or a formerly enslaved African American and identify the last enslaver. It will introduce Reconstruction Era records such as: The Freedmen’s Bureau records, Freedmen’s Bank Records, Southern Claims Commission records, military records, census records, voter’s registration, newspapers, and vital records. It will also cover methodology for 1870 African American brick wall problems.
This lecture will discuss how to get started in African American research. The objective of this presentation will be to research either a free person of color or a formerly enslaved African American and identify the last enslaver. It will introduce Reconstruction Era records such as: The Freedmen’s Bureau records, Freedmen’s Bank Records, Southern Claims Commission records, military records, census records, voter’s registration, newspapers, and vital records. It will also cover methodology for 1870 African American brick wall problems.
Fri, April 12 2024: 17:00 UTC
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Moving, moving, moving! Migration Patterns within Germany
Despite their reputation for being rooted to their localities, Germans do have a history of migration within their own country, especially after the onset of industrialization in the mid-19th century. In this presentation, we will explore the various patterns of internal migration, and offer guidance on how to navigate these movements to aid in your search for ancestors.
Despite their reputation for being rooted to their localities, Germans do have a history of migration within their own country, especially after the onset of industrialization in the mid-19th century. In this presentation, we will explore the various patterns of internal migration, and offer guidance on how to navigate these movements to aid in your search for ancestors.
Fri, April 12 2024: 12:00 UTC
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Scottish Genealogy – Are we a Clan or a Family? And can we have a Chief?
Not every Scottish surname is a Clan, despite what your “Clan Society” says. Are there really “Septs”? And how do we go about getting a Chief?
Not every Scottish surname is a Clan, despite what your “Clan Society” says. Are there really “Septs”? And how do we go about getting a Chief?
Fri, April 12 2024: 11:00 UTC
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Free
How to successfully research at a German archive
Due to the constantly growing offer of online accessible sources for German genealogical research, an important cornerstone of the actual research is more and more disregarded: the classical research in an archive. A good preparation facilitates the archive visit immensely and makes the search in the historical documents an experience that will never replace a research on the screen. Particularly if you intend to add “meat to the bones” and find more valuable information about your ancestors besides dates and places of birth, marriage and/or death. There are many individual records in German archives and it would be a shame never to look at these wonderful documents. A visit to a German archive can be rather intimidating. Besides language barriers, the archival structures are initially often difficult to understand. But help is near! This presentation will cover professional tips & tricks for research in a German Archive – from preparation over execution to follow-up, if applicable. If you are unfamiliar with a specific archive, it is already difficult as a German to make the most of an archival research visit. Particularly as archives do not offer to conduct complex research projects on your behalf, you have to be prepared to do it yourself.
Due to the constantly growing offer of online accessible sources for German genealogical research, an important cornerstone of the actual research is more and more disregarded: the classical research in an archive. A good preparation facilitates the archive visit immensely and makes the search in the historical documents an experience that will never replace a research on the screen. Particularly if you intend to add “meat to the bones” and find more valuable information about your ancestors besides dates and places of birth, marriage and/or death. There are many individual records in German archives and it would be a shame never to look at these wonderful documents. A visit to a German archive can be rather intimidating. Besides language barriers, the archival structures are initially often difficult to understand. But help is near! This presentation will cover professional tips & tricks for research in a German Archive – from preparation over execution to follow-up, if applicable. If you are unfamiliar with a specific archive, it is already difficult as a German to make the most of an archival research visit. Particularly as archives do not offer to conduct complex research projects on your behalf, you have to be prepared to do it yourself.
Fri, April 12 2024: 10:00 UTC
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Free
The Wilson Collection for New Zealand Researchers
The Wilson Collection was launched in 2021 and is one of New Zealand’s newest index sites. It contains a unique collection of contributions, including a marriage place index. Join Michelle as she takes us on a tour of this free, invaluable resource for New Zealand research. https://wilsoncollection.co.nz/
The Wilson Collection was launched in 2021 and is one of New Zealand’s newest index sites. It contains a unique collection of contributions, including a marriage place index. Join Michelle as she takes us on a tour of this free, invaluable resource for New Zealand research. https://wilsoncollection.co.nz/
Fri, April 12 2024: 9:00 UTC
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My Top 5 Websites for Victorian research in Australia
Victoria was the colony that experienced the gold rushes of the 1850s. This presentation looks at websites that assist anyone trying to find relatives in Victoria in the 19th century into the 20th century.
Shauna Hicks
Victoria was the colony that experienced the gold rushes of the 1850s. This presentation looks at websites that assist anyone trying to find relatives in Victoria in the 19th century into the 20th century.
Fri, April 12 2024: 8:00 UTC
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Free
Common Challenges in Greek Genealogy Research
What are the most common challenges in Greek genealogy research and how to deal with them? Using real case study material, Gregory Kontos shares experience and tips to help you overcome your research brick walls!
What are the most common challenges in Greek genealogy research and how to deal with them? Using real case study material, Gregory Kontos shares experience and tips to help you overcome your research brick walls!
Fri, April 12 2024: 6:00 UTC
50:17
543 views
Free
Searching for Your Family in NYC? Resources and Techniques at MyHeritage and Beyond
If you have any American heritage at all, chances are, you have at least one person in your family tree who lived at some point in New York City. Join Mike Mansfield, Director of Content Operations at MyHeritage, as he dives into a world of rich resources for researching ancestors who called the Big Apple home.
If you have any American heritage at all, chances are, you have at least one person in your family tree who lived at some point in New York City. Join Mike Mansfield, Director of Content Operations at MyHeritage, as he dives into a world of rich resources for researching ancestors who called the Big Apple home.
Fri, April 12 2024: 3:00 UTC
48:16
298 views
Free
The Picture Bride Era: The Gentlemen’s Agreement of 1907 between U.S. and Japan
The Gentlemen’s Agreement of 1907 was an agreement between the U.S. and Japan that restricted the immigration of Japanese laborers. Wives and children of laborers were permitted to immigrate. This led rise to what is informally called “The Picture Bride Era.” Learn about the history leading up to this policy, how the agreement impacted immigrants, what records were created, and why the policy expired in 1924.
The Gentlemen’s Agreement of 1907 was an agreement between the U.S. and Japan that restricted the immigration of Japanese laborers. Wives and children of laborers were permitted to immigrate. This led rise to what is informally called “The Picture Bride Era.” Learn about the history leading up to this policy, how the agreement impacted immigrants, what records were created, and why the policy expired in 1924.
Fri, April 12 2024: 2:00 UTC