Gail Jackson Miller, CG

Gail Jackson Miller, CG is a professional genealogist, teacher, writer, and lecturer specializing in Kentucky, Tennessee, and surrounding states with more than 40 years of genealogical experience. She became certified by the Board for Certification of Genealogist in 1999 and has more than 20 years working with clients on their families. She has spoken and taught nationally at NGS, FGS, IGHR, SLIG, and in the SLIG academy in addition to her work regionally and locally as a speaker, editor, in society leadership, and as a Family Search Center director. In her prior life, she was a nationally recognized biology teacher working with high school and college students. Her academic training was in biology and experimental psychology resulting in an M. S. and M.A.Ed. Gail is a native of western Kentucky currently living in Bowling Green.

Gail's Upcoming Live Webinars (1)

Wed, June 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Kentucky and Virginia Tax Lists – 5 ½ Strategies for Identifying That Elusive Early Southerner
Wed, June 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Kentucky and Virginia have some of the most complete tax lists in the United States. Their value in research often goes unrecognized by even the experienced researcher. Tax lists can be a primary tool for solving difficult research problems and are invaluable when used with other records. Learn how to access original records, to best organize them for study, and to interpret their meaning. The lecture will use case studies to show their use in tracking individuals across time, estimating birth dates and death dates, separating individuals of the same name, determining the identity of other family members, and using them as substitutes for deeds, court records, and estate records in burned counties.
Kentucky and Virginia have some of the most complete tax lists in the United States. Their value in research often goes unrecognized by even the experienced researcher. Tax lists can be a primary tool for solving difficult research problems and are invaluable when used with other records. Learn how to access original records, to best organize them for study, and to interpret their meaning. The lecture will use case studies to show their use in tracking individuals across time, estimating birth dates and death dates, separating individuals of the same name, determining the identity of other family members, and using them as substitutes for deeds, court records, and estate records in burned counties.
Wed, June 26 2024: 18:00 UTC