Family History on the Canadian Prairies

Dave Obee
Feb 17, 2023
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Content

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Welcome
1m 20s
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Speaker's Introduction
1m 14s
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Introduction
16m 56s
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Sources specific for the Prairies
24m 13s
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Canadiana and other sites
8m 59s
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More Records
4m 18s
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Announcements / przies
5m 50s
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Questions / answers
9m 58s

About this webinar

Most Canadians have connections to the three Prairie provinces, through cousins if not through ancestors. Researching those Prairie families can be rewarding, although it is important to note which sources are common to all three provinces, and which ones are unique to each province. Using examples from Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta, this session looks at a variety of resources, and offers tips to help you learn more about your families on the Prairies.

About the speaker

About the speaker

Dave Obee is a journalist and genealogical researcher who has written a dozen books and given more than 700 presentations at conferences and seminars in Canada, the United States and Australia since 1997. He is Editor and Publisher of the T
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  1. BA
    Beverly ALLEN
    1 year ago

    Thank you so much for all your amazing sharing of knowledge and webinars; thanks all you have done to help others find their families; etc. As I was adopted it is so hard to find bio father; and I do not have a lot of money to do research help, etc….blessing to KDGS for all their help; Best to all Beverly Allem good luck all and thanks Dave. Hard to find bio father; when no one is replying to DNA messages, etc. blessings to all for sharing!

    Reply
  2. AT
    Art Taylor
    1 year ago

    Generally great information. However, even in March 1885, there was no all-Canadian rail link from Ontario to Winnipeg. There was a gap of several miles along the north shore of Lake Superior. When the Canadian government sent troops to put down the Riel Rebellion of 1885, William Van Horn, General Manager of the CPR, arranged to send the troops from Ontario to End of Track, where their equipment was transferred to sleighs and the men marched across the frozen lake’s ice until they boarded trains at the End of Track coming east from Winnipeg. This gap was closed later in 1885, so was open to trains when the Last Spike was driven at Craigellachie, B.C. on 7 November, 1885. Regular passenger service across Canada didn’t begin until 1886, since heavy snow closed the line in the mountains for much of the winter. See Pierre Berton’s books “The National Dream”, “The Last Spike”, and “The Great Railway Illustrated.”, among others for the story of the CPR construction.

    Reply
  3. PC
    Paulette Campbell
    1 year ago

    Absolutely awesome webinar! Excellent presenter! Thank you for sharing examples of your family Dave Obee.

    Reply
  4. LW
    Laurie Watson
    1 year ago

    Dave Obee is an excellent presenter. He is very thorough. He presents interesting examples from his own family research.

    Reply
  5. JH
    Jane Harmon
    1 year ago

    Excellent webinar full of useful information. Dave is a great presenter, and never seems rushed, a valuable trait that benefits all learners.

    Reply
  6. XM
    Xana Miller
    1 year ago

    Thank you.

    Reply
  7. KH
    Kathleen Henning
    1 year ago

    I enjoyed listen to Dave, he had some good research tips I did not know about (some I did). But I certainly left with a list things to do.

    Reply
  8. HL
    Heather Latto
    1 year ago

    Very informative.

    Reply

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