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25:34
Excel Tips for DNA Analysis: How to Make a DNA Citation Template
Learn how to automatically create citations for your DNA matches to help you in organizing your genetic genealogy research efforts.
Learn how to automatically create citations for your DNA matches to help you in organizing your genetic genealogy research efforts.
Thu, September 28 2023: 6:00 UTC
1:33:09
10.4K views
CC
Standards for Genealogical Documentation
Genealogy Standards spells out eight documentation standards, which give genealogists guidance for documenting genealogical writing. They also provide guidance for citation content, while allowing flexibility in the sequencing and structuring of citations supporting genealogical statements. This presentation will review the standards and provide examples of applying their principles.
Genealogy Standards spells out eight documentation standards, which give genealogists guidance for documenting genealogical writing. They also provide guidance for citation content, while allowing flexibility in the sequencing and structuring of citations supporting genealogical statements. This presentation will review the standards and provide examples of applying their principles.
Tue, August 17 2021: 0:00 UTC
51:39
11.5K views
CC
Record As You Go, Cite As You Go, & File As You Go
Genealogists tend to get very excited about new records and sources they come across in their research. So much so that they grab a quick copy, download it to default folders, and move on to the next item without thoroughly exploring the source first. All too often they don't take…
Genealogists tend to get very excited about new records and sources they come across in their research. So much so that they grab a quick copy, download it to default folders, and move on to the next item without thoroughly exploring the source first. All too often they don't take…
Thu, April 8 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:27:34
Citation for Beginners
Learning to write genealogical citations is part art, part science and potentially terrifying. Learn what important components to note while researching, and how to put them together while writing to subdue the panic, and produce quality work.
Learning to write genealogical citations is part art, part science and potentially terrifying. Learn what important components to note while researching, and how to put them together while writing to subdue the panic, and produce quality work.
Fri, December 14 2018: 0:00 UTC
Advanced
1:39:22
63.3K views
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Free
Sources and Citations Made Simple, Standard, and Powerful
If genealogy without documentation is mythology, recording our citations is essential to sound genealogical research. In this webinar, Geoff Rasmussen will 1) explain what makes a good citation, 2) demonstrate how to properly and consistently record the citation, and 3) provide insider tips and tricks for using Legacy's SourceWriter.
If genealogy without documentation is mythology, recording our citations is essential to sound genealogical research. In this webinar, Geoff Rasmussen will 1) explain what makes a good citation, 2) demonstrate how to properly and consistently record the citation, and 3) provide insider tips and tricks for using Legacy's SourceWriter.
Fri, March 7 2014: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (108)
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 1
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 2
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogical Research & Writing: Are You a Saint, Sinner, or Bumfuzzled Soul?
Fri, July 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
As researchers, family historians, compilers, bloggers, or writers of other ilk, genealogists face legal and ethical perils they often do not anticipate. This crash course offers practical guidance to enhance your skills and keep you safe as you explore history, reconstruct lives, and “write up” your findings. While the issues are serious—from the legal issue of copyright to the ethical issue of plagiarism—the lessons are taught with a light heart and humor.
As researchers, family historians, compilers, bloggers, or writers of other ilk, genealogists face legal and ethical perils they often do not anticipate. This crash course offers practical guidance to enhance your skills and keep you safe as you explore history, reconstruct lives, and “write up” your findings. While the issues are serious—from the legal issue of copyright to the ethical issue of plagiarism—the lessons are taught with a light heart and humor.
Fri, July 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Tue, November 19 2024: 19:00 UTC
Dear Me: Writing Research Reports to Yourself
Tue, November 19 2024: 19:00 UTC
Research reports are not just for professionals, but are a great tool for anyone who wants to answer their research questions. Write a research report to yourself to organize your thoughts, analyze the evidence, document your findings, and solve your puzzles. Using an example from the Netherlands, this presentation demonstrates how you can organize a research report to spot more clues in records, discover and resolve discrepancies, and build reliable conclusions.
Research reports are not just for professionals, but are a great tool for anyone who wants to answer their research questions. Write a research report to yourself to organize your thoughts, analyze the evidence, document your findings, and solve your puzzles. Using an example from the Netherlands, this presentation demonstrates how you can organize a research report to spot more clues in records, discover and resolve discrepancies, and build reliable conclusions.
Tue, November 19 2024: 19:00 UTC
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
French Emigrants: They Were Not All Huguenots, or Nobles, or from Alsace-Lorraine
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the 19th century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the 19th century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
Wed, April 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Comparing Plats of Land With Deeds and Grants
Wed, April 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Land Plats of an ancestor’s land will likely include his surrounding neighbors. With a closer examination, we might gain an understanding of their lives and place them with their community and local events.
Land Plats of an ancestor’s land will likely include his surrounding neighbors. With a closer examination, we might gain an understanding of their lives and place them with their community and local events.
Wed, April 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, April 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Tools to Research Your French Canadian Ancestors
Fri, April 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
With the right tools, searching for your French Canadian ancestors in Quebec has never been easier. French Canadians are passionate about their ancestral lineage, consequently a large number of repositories exist, both public and private, to help trace your French Canadian ancestors. Although the well known Drouin Collection is a wonderful source of genealogical data, many more databases exist on French Canadian ancestry. This presentation will focus on lesser known databases and websites to help you find your elusive French Canadian ancestors or to add valuable information to your ancestors’ lives.
With the right tools, searching for your French Canadian ancestors in Quebec has never been easier. French Canadians are passionate about their ancestral lineage, consequently a large number of repositories exist, both public and private, to help trace your French Canadian ancestors. Although the well known Drouin Collection is a wonderful source of genealogical data, many more databases exist on French Canadian ancestry. This presentation will focus on lesser known databases and websites to help you find your elusive French Canadian ancestors or to add valuable information to your ancestors’ lives.
Fri, April 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Tue, April 23 2024: 18:00 UTC
Using Artificial Intelligence Tools to Expand Your Genealogical Research Universe
Tue, April 23 2024: 18:00 UTC
In the past few years, there has been an explosion of new AI tools. See how these exciting tools can be used to expand your genealogical research efforts. The three classes will cover different types of AI and then focus on AI-based chat tools, research tools, and generative imaging tools. The impact that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is having and will have on genealogical research will be revolutionary. Don’t miss this chance to explore the exciting possibilities that artificial intelligence offers to genealogical research.
In the past few years, there has been an explosion of new AI tools. See how these exciting tools can be used to expand your genealogical research efforts. The three classes will cover different types of AI and then focus on AI-based chat tools, research tools, and generative imaging tools. The impact that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is having and will have on genealogical research will be revolutionary. Don’t miss this chance to explore the exciting possibilities that artificial intelligence offers to genealogical research.
Tue, April 23 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, April 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
Where Fact meets Fiction: behind the scenes of a genealogical crime mystery
Wed, April 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
This webinar by genealogical crime mystery author, Nathan Dylan Goodwin, will take a deep dive into one of his most popular books, The Sterling Affair, which set in the world of 1950s international affairs of state. The webinar will explore how real history, facts and people were incorporated into a fictional story using both traditional and genetic genealogy to solve the mystery at the heart of this story.
This webinar by genealogical crime mystery author, Nathan Dylan Goodwin, will take a deep dive into one of his most popular books, The Sterling Affair, which set in the world of 1950s international affairs of state. The webinar will explore how real history, facts and people were incorporated into a fictional story using both traditional and genetic genealogy to solve the mystery at the heart of this story.
Wed, April 24 2024: 18:00 UTC