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Fri, February 3 2023: 19:00 UTC
Gradual Emancipation and Enslavement in the North
Fri, February 3 2023: 19:00 UTC
Slavery existed in some northern states well into the 19th century. Learn about the motives for gradual emancipation, how it affected enslaved African Americans and enslavers at this time, the state laws surrounding slavery, and the records that it created.
Slavery existed in some northern states well into the 19th century. Learn about the motives for gradual emancipation, how it affected enslaved African Americans and enslavers at this time, the state laws surrounding slavery, and the records that it created.
Fri, February 3 2023: 19:00 UTC
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
Tick Marks and Number Counts: Understanding and Using the Slave Schedules
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
What exactly are the 1850 and 1860 United States Slave Schedules and what is their value to researchers? A closer look at this enumeration of “slave inhabitants” will streamline interpretation of these records and will help define the do’s and don’ts of working with them.
What exactly are the 1850 and 1860 United States Slave Schedules and what is their value to researchers? A closer look at this enumeration of “slave inhabitants” will streamline interpretation of these records and will help define the do’s and don’ts of working with them.
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
Fri, April 14 2023: 1:00 UTC
The FAN Club Methodology, DNA, and Genealogy Lead Back to Lunatic’s Plantation
Fri, April 14 2023: 1:00 UTC
Utilizing the FAN Club method, DNA, and enslaved ancestral research, Collier finally found major clues to help solve a longtime mystery – who was the previous enslaver of his great-great grandmother, Polly Partee of Panola County, Mississippi, and where did she come from? Her last enslaver was Squire Boone Partee of Panola County, and Polly had been the head cook on his plantation during and after slavery, according to oral history. According to the censuses, she was born somewhere in North Carolina and sold to Squire by 1852, but her origins had been largely unknown. Collier will present a plethora of DNA evidence, in conjunction with genealogy research and the FAN Club methodology, to uncover Polly’s North Carolina origins. Collier will also argue how a court-investigated lunatic, Alfred Alston of Fayette County, Tennessee, was most likely her previous enslaver.
Utilizing the FAN Club method, DNA, and enslaved ancestral research, Collier finally found major clues to help solve a longtime mystery – who was the previous enslaver of his great-great grandmother, Polly Partee of Panola County, Mississippi, and where did she come from? Her last enslaver was Squire Boone Partee of Panola County, and Polly had been the head cook on his plantation during and after slavery, according to oral history. According to the censuses, she was born somewhere in North Carolina and sold to Squire by 1852, but her origins had been largely unknown. Collier will present a plethora of DNA evidence, in conjunction with genealogy research and the FAN Club methodology, to uncover Polly’s North Carolina origins. Collier will also argue how a court-investigated lunatic, Alfred Alston of Fayette County, Tennessee, was most likely her previous enslaver.
Fri, April 14 2023: 1:00 UTC
Fri, April 14 2023: 14:00 UTC
Giving Them Their Glory: First Kansas/US Colored Troops 79th Regiment
Fri, April 14 2023: 14:00 UTC
Organized in August 1862, the First Kansas Colored Infantry was the first Black unit recruited in the North, the first to see and die in battle in the Civil War. Made up of both free and enslaved men, including those from the Five Tribes, its exploits were legendary. Yet, the lives of its rank and file outside of their service were prolific and unsung.
Organized in August 1862, the First Kansas Colored Infantry was the first Black unit recruited in the North, the first to see and die in battle in the Civil War. Made up of both free and enslaved men, including those from the Five Tribes, its exploits were legendary. Yet, the lives of its rank and file outside of their service were prolific and unsung.
Fri, April 14 2023: 14:00 UTC
Fri, May 5 2023: 18:00 UTC
Working on the Railroad: Pullman Porters and Maids
Fri, May 5 2023: 18:00 UTC
The Pullman Company was one of the leading employers of African Americans, primarily male Porters, who worked on the railroad in the late 19th and early 20th century. This presentation will look briefly at the general growth of the railroad as well as the Pullman Company which built rail cars and rented them to rail companies. Pullman hired primarily African American men and women to staff the dining and sleeping cars. What was the job like and what were lives like for the Porters and Maids? How do we find records of ancestors who were Pullman Porters or Maids?
The Pullman Company was one of the leading employers of African Americans, primarily male Porters, who worked on the railroad in the late 19th and early 20th century. This presentation will look briefly at the general growth of the railroad as well as the Pullman Company which built rail cars and rented them to rail companies. Pullman hired primarily African American men and women to staff the dining and sleeping cars. What was the job like and what were lives like for the Porters and Maids? How do we find records of ancestors who were Pullman Porters or Maids?
Fri, May 5 2023: 18:00 UTC
Fri, June 2 2023: 18:00 UTC
Afro-Louisiana History and Genealogy, 1718-1820
Fri, June 2 2023: 18:00 UTC
This groundbreaking collection, which also goes by the name Louisiana, U.S., Records of Enslaved People, 1719-1820, was the brainchild of Dr. Gwendolyn Midlo-Hall and features the names, genders, ages, occupations, illnesses, family relationships, places of origin and more for upwards of 100,000 formerly enslaved in Louisiana. In this session, learn the history of the collection, where records were obtained, how to search and find original documents, and more.
This groundbreaking collection, which also goes by the name Louisiana, U.S., Records of Enslaved People, 1719-1820, was the brainchild of Dr. Gwendolyn Midlo-Hall and features the names, genders, ages, occupations, illnesses, family relationships, places of origin and more for upwards of 100,000 formerly enslaved in Louisiana. In this session, learn the history of the collection, where records were obtained, how to search and find original documents, and more.
Fri, June 2 2023: 18:00 UTC
Fri, July 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
8 Brick Wall Busters for Midwest African American Ancestors
Fri, July 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
Discover 8 options for pushing through difficult research of Midwestern Black families.
LaDonna Garner
Discover 8 options for pushing through difficult research of Midwestern Black families.
Fri, July 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
Fri, August 4 2023: 18:00 UTC
Loyalists, Freedmen and Frauds in the Southern Claims Commission
Fri, August 4 2023: 18:00 UTC
Using the records of the Southern Claims Commission to discover first-person accounts of the lives of freedmen, Union loyalists and former Confederates in their efforts to recover losses during the Civil war; includes the structure of the SCC and how the records can be used to advance research goals.
Using the records of the Southern Claims Commission to discover first-person accounts of the lives of freedmen, Union loyalists and former Confederates in their efforts to recover losses during the Civil war; includes the structure of the SCC and how the records can be used to advance research goals.
Fri, August 4 2023: 18:00 UTC
Fri, September 1 2023: 18:00 UTC
Following Oral History in search of William Davis but finding Mildred Brand: A Case Study
Fri, September 1 2023: 18:00 UTC
A researcher’s number one goal is to find ancestors for their client or their own family and share their story. Within the story oral history is followed, critical records and resources will be discovered which helped guide the research. This session will take attendees through the challenges, successes, and the continued unanswered questions of researching an African American family from enslavement to freedom through the states of VA, PA, OH, and MI.
A researcher’s number one goal is to find ancestors for their client or their own family and share their story. Within the story oral history is followed, critical records and resources will be discovered which helped guide the research. This session will take attendees through the challenges, successes, and the continued unanswered questions of researching an African American family from enslavement to freedom through the states of VA, PA, OH, and MI.
Fri, September 1 2023: 18:00 UTC
Fri, September 22 2023: 18:00 UTC
Finding John Lee
Fri, September 22 2023: 18:00 UTC
Discover how DNA, online and offline genealogy converged to break down a more than 100 year old brick wall revealing the life, times, and relations of a mysterious multi-ethnic man named John Lee.
Discover how DNA, online and offline genealogy converged to break down a more than 100 year old brick wall revealing the life, times, and relations of a mysterious multi-ethnic man named John Lee.
Fri, September 22 2023: 18:00 UTC
Fri, November 3 2023: 18:00 UTC
Friends of Friends: Quakers and African American Communities
Fri, November 3 2023: 18:00 UTC
Well-known for their anti-slavery views, Quakers began to migrate to the slave-free territories in the 19th century. As they migrated out of the South, Quakers emancipated and traveled with their newly freed slaves. Once settled, the sect continued their abolitionist cause by supporting the Underground Railroad – transporting runaway slaves to free states. In turn, free blacks established their own settlements, while still maintaining ties with the Quaker community.
Well-known for their anti-slavery views, Quakers began to migrate to the slave-free territories in the 19th century. As they migrated out of the South, Quakers emancipated and traveled with their newly freed slaves. Once settled, the sect continued their abolitionist cause by supporting the Underground Railroad – transporting runaway slaves to free states. In turn, free blacks established their own settlements, while still maintaining ties with the Quaker community.
Fri, November 3 2023: 18:00 UTC
Fri, December 1 2023: 19:00 UTC
Who Were “Felix Richards’ Slaves”?: Identifying Enslaved People Photographed During the Civil War
Fri, December 1 2023: 19:00 UTC
Nine African Americans — two women and seven children — were posed amid a laundry day setting in a rare Civil War-era photograph. The handwritten caption identified them only as “Felix Richards Slaves” and the location as Volusia, near Alexandria, Va. Could their true identities be established? In this case study, historian and genealogist Amy Bertsch discusses a variety of sources, including probate records, a chancery suit, Civil War pension applications, and the former enslaver’s federal compensation claim, she used to identify the individuals in the photo, which is now at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. She explores how these records can yield new discoveries for family historians and she also demonstrates the importance of researching the enslaver’s family when conducting African American family research.
Nine African Americans — two women and seven children — were posed amid a laundry day setting in a rare Civil War-era photograph. The handwritten caption identified them only as “Felix Richards Slaves” and the location as Volusia, near Alexandria, Va. Could their true identities be established? In this case study, historian and genealogist Amy Bertsch discusses a variety of sources, including probate records, a chancery suit, Civil War pension applications, and the former enslaver’s federal compensation claim, she used to identify the individuals in the photo, which is now at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. She explores how these records can yield new discoveries for family historians and she also demonstrates the importance of researching the enslaver’s family when conducting African American family research.
Fri, December 1 2023: 19:00 UTC

Featured Webinars

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1:07:48
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Settlers, Squatters and Selectors: Land ownership in Australia, 1788-1900
Since the early days of British settlement in Australia, land has been considered to be one of its greatest assets. Until 1831, some settlers received large grants of land while others were entitled to only 30 acres, plus an additional 20 acres if married and 10 acres for each child. Over the next seventy years, the colonies developed their own land allocation schemes, each devised for a specific purpose. This presentation will highlight the records which relate to Crown Land, pastoral runs, land selection, occupation records, land orders and land ownership.
Since the early days of British settlement in Australia, land has been considered to be one of its greatest assets. Until 1831, some settlers received large grants of land while others were entitled to only 30 acres, plus an additional 20 acres if married and 10 acres for each child. Over the next seventy years, the colonies developed their own land allocation schemes, each devised for a specific purpose. This presentation will highlight the records which relate to Crown Land, pastoral runs, land selection, occupation records, land orders and land ownership.
Wed, February 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
1:22:14
Trail of Tears to Indian Territory
Following the 1830 Indian Removal Act about 100,000 American Indians were forced from their homes to westward lands. Follow their story, their trails, and their records.
Following the 1830 Indian Removal Act about 100,000 American Indians were forced from their homes to westward lands. Follow their story, their trails, and their records.
Wed, January 25 2023: 19:00 UTC
1:30:37
Foundational Concepts & Reference Tools for Mexican Genealogy
We pour a lot of time, money, and soul into our family history research. So, we want to make sure we are tracing the right people and families in the right place at any given time, and that we glean all possible information and clues from the records. This presentation reviews social and cultural customs, and tools for learning about jurisdictions and key terminology. It is suitable for those still new to Mexican genealogy as well as more experienced researchers.
We pour a lot of time, money, and soul into our family history research. So, we want to make sure we are tracing the right people and families in the right place at any given time, and that we glean all possible information and clues from the records. This presentation reviews social and cultural customs, and tools for learning about jurisdictions and key terminology. It is suitable for those still new to Mexican genealogy as well as more experienced researchers.
Fri, January 20 2023: 19:00 UTC
1:26:17
779 views
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Exploring the Records in a Slave Owning Community
This session will focus on the thousands of transactions occurring in Edgefield, South Carolina in a County that did not burn, therefore, these records revealed the value placed on a slave in this community. “In the antebellum South, a prime male hand was the overriding measure for determining prices for enslaved workers. Hearty, prime women who were good breeders also had a high market value. Other factors that contributed to the sale price of a slave were gender, age, and skill.”
This session will focus on the thousands of transactions occurring in Edgefield, South Carolina in a County that did not burn, therefore, these records revealed the value placed on a slave in this community. “In the antebellum South, a prime male hand was the overriding measure for determining prices for enslaved workers. Hearty, prime women who were good breeders also had a high market value. Other factors that contributed to the sale price of a slave were gender, age, and skill.”
Wed, January 18 2023: 19:00 UTC
1:31:20
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How Three Types of DNA and Genealogy Uncovered the Long-Lost Enslaved Father
For over 25 years, oral history led Melvin Collier down the wrong road in the search for the father of his great-grandfather, Albert Kennedy (1857-1928) of Leake County, Mississippi. DNA was indeed providing great clues, but he initially attached them to the wrong ancestor. However, more autosomal DNA analysis, Y-DNA evidence, X-chromosome matching, and genealogy research revealed that the oral history had not been entirely true. This put Collier on the right road to discovery. Travel down this exciting genealogical road as Collier shows how DNA and genealogy led him to the identity and the story of his 2X-great grandfather. Ironically, he was born in northern Virginia, where Collier resides now, and was eventually taken to Sugartown, Louisiana during the Civil War. Lots of genealogy and genetic genealogy tips to be gained from this case.
For over 25 years, oral history led Melvin Collier down the wrong road in the search for the father of his great-grandfather, Albert Kennedy (1857-1928) of Leake County, Mississippi. DNA was indeed providing great clues, but he initially attached them to the wrong ancestor. However, more autosomal DNA analysis, Y-DNA evidence, X-chromosome matching, and genealogy research revealed that the oral history had not been entirely true. This put Collier on the right road to discovery. Travel down this exciting genealogical road as Collier shows how DNA and genealogy led him to the identity and the story of his 2X-great grandfather. Ironically, he was born in northern Virginia, where Collier resides now, and was eventually taken to Sugartown, Louisiana during the Civil War. Lots of genealogy and genetic genealogy tips to be gained from this case.
Fri, January 6 2023: 19:00 UTC
1:07:27
274 views
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Idaho Research: Genealogy Gems Galore
Abundant records for Census, Church, Court, Land & Property, and Directories make researching in Idaho a productive experience. Online databases for Pre-Territorial Tax Rolls, Old Penitentiary Prison Records, 1882-1961, Wills and Probate Records, 1857-1989, Obituaries, and Historical Newspapers are treasures. True gems are found in the Pioneer Histories, Index of over 75,000 Biographical Sketches, Overland Diaries & Letters, and records for Idaho Indian Tribes described on research facility and American Indian websites.
Abundant records for Census, Church, Court, Land & Property, and Directories make researching in Idaho a productive experience. Online databases for Pre-Territorial Tax Rolls, Old Penitentiary Prison Records, 1882-1961, Wills and Probate Records, 1857-1989, Obituaries, and Historical Newspapers are treasures. True gems are found in the Pioneer Histories, Index of over 75,000 Biographical Sketches, Overland Diaries & Letters, and records for Idaho Indian Tribes described on research facility and American Indian websites.
Wed, December 28 2022: 19:00 UTC
1:18:36
581 views
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How the West Was Won in Canada
The Canadian west was not won by cowboys and guns. The west was won by homesteaders, NWMP (RCMP), and railways. For a $10 registration fee and a lot of hard work a male farmer could have 160 acres of land. Farmers or want-to-be-farmers came from all over. We will use a couple of case studies, search for homestead records, review all the components to understand what the records indicate, convert the data to enter and locate it on Google Maps, and view what the area looks like today. Other records such as Hudson’s Bay Company and RCMP records will be shown.
The Canadian west was not won by cowboys and guns. The west was won by homesteaders, NWMP (RCMP), and railways. For a $10 registration fee and a lot of hard work a male farmer could have 160 acres of land. Farmers or want-to-be-farmers came from all over. We will use a couple of case studies, search for homestead records, review all the components to understand what the records indicate, convert the data to enter and locate it on Google Maps, and view what the area looks like today. Other records such as Hudson’s Bay Company and RCMP records will be shown.
Fri, December 16 2022: 19:00 UTC
1:28:11
128 views
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Japanese American Research
Japanese began immigrating to the U.S. in large numbers after the implementation of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Explore both conventional and ethnic specific U.S. records as they pertain to those of Japanese ancestry. The time frame ranges from the late 19th century through post-World War II.
Japanese began immigrating to the U.S. in large numbers after the implementation of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Explore both conventional and ethnic specific U.S. records as they pertain to those of Japanese ancestry. The time frame ranges from the late 19th century through post-World War II.
Thu, December 15 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:30:29
Lloyd’s of London: its history and its records for shipping
Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.
Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.
Wed, December 7 2022: 1:00 UTC