Reasonably Exhaustive Research of African American Families That Came Out of Slavery

Reasonably Exhaustive Research of African American Families That Came Out of Slavery

by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG

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Reasonably Exhaustive Research of African American Families That Came Out of Slavery


The first component of the Genealogical Proof Standard is the conduct of reasonably exhaustive research. This lecture will highlight the sources and strategies available to meet this requirement in the case of African American ancestors who were enslaved.


 
 

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Presenter: LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG

LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. Board-certified since 2015, LaBrenda focuses on African American families with roots in the South. She was elected as a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists in 2016 and is a frequent speaker at national and local venues. She earned a BA in government from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, and both a Law degree and a Master of Laws degree from New York University School of Law. LaBrenda took first place in the category for published authors in the 2013 International Society of Family History Writers and Editors “Excellence-in-Writing Competition,” and has also been published in the BCG blog as well the National Genealogical Society Quarterly. While practicing law she authored several editions of her family history as well as two church histories, and in 2016 she published a guide and selected finding aids for researching African Americans in South Carolina.

LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG