Who Were “Felix Richards’ Slaves”?: Identifying Enslaved People Photographed During the Civil War

Amy Bertsch
Dec 1, 2023
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Free through December 8, 2023
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Content

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Welcome
1m 50s
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Speaker's Introduction
1m 20s
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Introduction
6m 26s
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Enslaver's Family
7m 05s
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Virginia Chancery Cases
9m 41s
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Virginia Slave Birth Index
11m 00s
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Finding Family in Freedom
4m 28s
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Civil War Pension Applications
4m 19s
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Identifying Individuals in Photo
11m 01s
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Announcements / prizes
5m 18s
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Questions / answers
8m 12s

About this webinar

Nine African Americans — two women and seven children — were posed amid a laundry day setting in a rare Civil War-era photograph. The handwritten caption identified them only as “Felix Richards Slaves” and the location as Volusia, near Alexandria, Va. Could their true identities be established? In this case study, historian and genealogist Amy Bertsch discusses a variety of sources, including probate records, a chancery suit, Civil War pension applications, and the former enslaver’s federal compensation claim, she used to identify the individuals in the photo, which is now at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. She explores how these records can yield new discoveries for family historians and she also demonstrates the importance of researching the enslaver’s family when conducting African American family research.

Discount code: felix (valid at Familytreewebinars.com)

Valid through: December 5, 2023

About the speaker

About the speaker

Amy Bertsch is a historian specializing in African American and Virginia history who has taught in the Public History and Historic Preservation certificate program at Northern Virginia Community College. She previously worked in public history at
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  1. MC
    Maria Capaldi
    24 hours ago

    It was terrific!

    Reply
  2. BA
    Beverly Anderson
    24 hours ago

    Amazing.

    Reply
  3. OW
    Omer Winborn
    24 hours ago

    Such wonderful research

    Reply
  4. CW
    Carolyn Williamson
    24 hours ago

    I consider myself new to the genealogy research. I have been researching my family for the past 5 years and have gotten as far back as 1780 on my mother’s branch. My father’s family has lead me to many barriers. Today’s webinar gives me hope and a new direct for researching the possibilities.

    Reply
  5. JT
    Jean Tempke
    24 hours ago

    Excellent presentation! I’m amazed at the information she found and how she was able to identify the people in the photo.

    Reply
  6. MF
    Melissa Foremny
    24 hours ago

    Very interesting!

    Reply
  7. GM
    Gloria Martin
    24 hours ago

    Excellent presentation

    Reply
  8. BF
    Bev Field
    24 hours ago

    I have a white Union soldier that served was stationed guarding various bridges just west of Nashville, TN. There are photos of some of these bridges with soldiers in them. Now curious to delve more into them and any others. I have that ancestor’s 3-monthly attendance reports of where he was and actuall saw he was out on duty at the exact time of the Battle of Franklin, TN. Easy marching distance from these bridges, this I know because I lived just north of Franklin in later years.

    Reply

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