The Trifecta: Giving Light to the Lives of the Formerly Enslaved

Nicka Smith
Free

Take a deep dive through case studies to learn how Civil War Pensions, the Freedmen’s Bureau, and Probates/Successions come together to reveal the pre-emancipation, post emancipation, and 20th Century lives of the formerly enslaved and their families.

Fri, December 6 2024: 19:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Nicka Smith is a professional photographer, speaker, host, and documentarian with more than 20 years of experience as a genealogist. She has extensive experience in African ancestored genealogy, revers
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