Tips and Tools for Navigating the English Probate System

Paul Milner, FUGA, MDiv
Free

The probate system in England and Wales changed significantly in 1858. Learn how the English probate system worked before and after that change, see what records are available and why they are of value. Learn tips and tools for procedures which will simplify the search process, whether the ancestor’s location in England is known or unknown.

Wed, March 1 2023: 1:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Paul Milner, a native of northern England, is a professional genealogist and internationally known lecturer with 30 years’ experience, specializing in British Isles research. Here’s the backstory about Paul:
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