Organization: Create a Finding Aid to Locate Your Records

Teri E. Flack
Jan 29, 2022
1.4K views
CC
Want to watch the full webinar?
Join now to access all 1,893 webinars and unlock all features.

Content

Play. Playing.
Introduction
10m 31s
Play. Playing.
Create a Template
11m 00s
Play. Playing.
Identify Files
5m 27s
Play. Playing.
Download Document Names
14m 35s
Play. Playing.
Next Steps
6m 37s
Play. Playing.
Uses for Finding Aid
11m 56s

About this webinar

Organization: Create a Finding Aid to Locate Your Records

About the speaker

About the speaker

Teri E. Flack, M.A. (Public History), M.B.A., began her family history quest over 50 years ago when she asked her paternal grandmother to tell her everything she knew about the Flacks and Fenleys. Although she had to be content with researching in
Learn more...

Comments (20)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

1000 characters remaining

Sort by Newest
Sort by Close.
  • Newest
  • Oldest
  • Likes
  1. TG
    Theresa Giannetto
    10 months ago

    Help needed with the Karen Directory Printer, please!
    I loved the webinar… got all motivated to organize, but seem to be at a stumbling block with the Karen app!

    I file my stuff on OneDrive. It is not on my C: drive.
    For the life of me, I cannot figure out how/why/where to get the Karen app to point to anything on OneDrive!
    It will only show folders/files located on the actual hard drive, it appears.
    ..
    Am I missing something obvious here? Looking forward to any help you all can provide! Thank you!

    Reply
    1 Reply
  2. DE
    Diane Eppestine
    10 months ago

    This is brilliant. I love Excel. It’s so versatile – I even created a quilt design on it once upon a time. I’m going to start my finding aid as soon as I post this.

    I’ve been able to split apart file path names, but this shouldn’t be too much extra work when doing a folder at a time. Use Windows File Explorer and select the folder, subfolder, or file you want. The Copy Path (in the Clipboard section of the Home tab) can then be used. Paste that into an Excel worksheet. Go to the Excel Data tab, and under Data Tools section, select Text to Columns which brings up a Wizard. Choose Delimited as the Data Type in the first step, then choose Other as the delimiter & enter a backslash next to that. Each segment of the file path will end up in its own column. If needed, move all of the filenames to the same column, then copy/paste into the finding aid. Directions may be slightly different in other versions of Excel/similar products.

    How do you keep track of which folders you’ve worked on?

    Reply
  3. PK
    Peg Kenaga
    10 months ago

    This was fantastic! Thank you for your presentation. You answered several questions I have had about using Excel spreadsheets, and creating a “Finding Aid” will be so helpful.

    Reply
    1 Reply
    • TF
      Teri Flack
      10 months ago

      Thank you, Peg.

  4. JW
    John Ware
    10 months ago

    You can create a text file of a directory contents in Windows 10. It is old school, but it works. Open a Command Prompt, navigate to the directory of interest using the cd (Change Directory) command, then perform a dir (directory command) with the following syntax:
    dir *.* /b > FindingAide.txt
    This will list all the files in that directory by name only and create the text file named FindingAide.txt in that directory. If you want you can add a /s after the /b and the command will then include all subdirectories under that directory.
    dir *.* /b /s > FindingAide.txt
    Also if you enter dir /? The available syntax options for the dir command.

    Reply
    1 Reply
    • TF
      Teri Flack
      10 months ago

      Thanks for sharing this John. I’m not sure I ever would have figured that out. Teri

  5. DH
    Douglas Hill
    10 months ago

    Where do you put the title of the Book in the Citation column?

    Reply
    1 Reply
    • TF
      Teri Flack
      10 months ago

      I write a normal citation in that column, so I would put Author, Title (publication place: publisher, date), page number. When I name the file I put the title in single ‘quotation’ marks.

  6. Betty Swan
    10 months ago

    Teri
    Thanks for much for the ‘print’ file list ap. I have missed this tool since DOS was retired.
    I always found it useful to retire/delete old and redundant data.

    Reply
  7. CL
    Celia Lewis
    10 months ago

    Excellent and helps me figure out what I need to learn in Excel. I’m always diffident at sorting because I’m nervous at upending all the columns and never getting them back to normal!! Thanks so much for your very careful webinar, and your handout as well. I’m at the one tiny step at a time stage with spreadsheets. 🙂

    Reply
    1 Reply
    • TF
      Teri Flack
      10 months ago

      I’ve found that copying a worksheet (which duplicates it) lets me practice my sorting without the risk of upending the columns in the original worksheet. Once I know I’ve got everything down the way I want it, I sort on the original worksheet. The key is to select all of the cells in the rows/columns before sorting.

  8. Ed Burrola
    10 months ago

    I enjoyed your TON of ideas, I like your spreadsheet format even though I am a 84 year old junior at spreadsheets, I hope to learn some or all of your ideas ONE SPOON at a time.
    Thanks Teri

    Reply
    1 Reply
    • TF
      Teri Flack
      10 months ago

      We’ve all been juniors at some point, Ed. I think the beauty of this is that it is an easy one to get started in a spreadsheet. Start with the folder with the least number of documents and play around with it. You’ll get the hang of it in no time.

Related Webinars