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1:06:56
880 views
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Getting Out of the Archives and Into the Pubs to Trace Your Irish Ancestry
This webinar demonstrates how Eliza Watson traced her Coffey ancestry line back eight generations from southwest Wisconsin to Ireland in 1705. An amazing feat due to the lack of Irish historical records. Her success was thanks to a newfound Irish Daly relation, extensive cemetery research, and a local historian. The webinar provides creative ways to break down an Irish research brick wall.
This webinar demonstrates how Eliza Watson traced her Coffey ancestry line back eight generations from southwest Wisconsin to Ireland in 1705. An amazing feat due to the lack of Irish historical records. Her success was thanks to a newfound Irish Daly relation, extensive cemetery research, and a local historian. The webinar provides creative ways to break down an Irish research brick wall.
Wed, May 1 2024: 2:00 UTC
1:23:17
3.2K views
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Using DNA To Identify Irish Ancestral Locations
For many of us who have Irish ancestry, the major question is ‘but where in Ireland?’ Like millions of other descendants of Irish emigrants, Michelle Leonard has Irish ancestors who left Ireland in the 1840s-60s and on nearly all documents she can find for them their birthplaces were given simply as ‘Ireland’. In many cases traditional research is not able to narrow down exactly where in Ireland our ancestors lived and trying to trace them across the seas is often a ‘needle in a haystack’ endeavour. In this personal case study, Michelle will outline how she managed to identify exact locations in Ireland for her Irish lines using the power of DNA testing and will provide strategies and top tips that could help you do the same.
For many of us who have Irish ancestry, the major question is ‘but where in Ireland?’ Like millions of other descendants of Irish emigrants, Michelle Leonard has Irish ancestors who left Ireland in the 1840s-60s and on nearly all documents she can find for them their birthplaces were given simply as ‘Ireland’. In many cases traditional research is not able to narrow down exactly where in Ireland our ancestors lived and trying to trace them across the seas is often a ‘needle in a haystack’ endeavour. In this personal case study, Michelle will outline how she managed to identify exact locations in Ireland for her Irish lines using the power of DNA testing and will provide strategies and top tips that could help you do the same.
Wed, March 6 2024: 19:00 UTC
1:28:45
2.4K views
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Irish ancestors – Top 5 websites you need to know about
This webinar is a romp through the top 5 websites where you will find information on your Irish ancestors. Best of all most of them are free! This is ideal if you are at the start of your Irish ancestral research and will give you a good grounding before delving into the more obscure record sets.
This webinar is a romp through the top 5 websites where you will find information on your Irish ancestors. Best of all most of them are free! This is ideal if you are at the start of your Irish ancestral research and will give you a good grounding before delving into the more obscure record sets.
Fri, January 5 2024: 19:00 UTC
50:19
993 views
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Unearthing the treasures in the Irish Registry of Deeds
The Registry of Deeds based in Dublin has been in existence since 1704 and manages the legal registration of property. Less well known is that it is also a repository for genealogical treasures such as wills, property leases and marriage agreements. People named in these records include the principal parties and also wider family members and witnesses. It is also possible to find records by location. These records are available as microfilms on the Family Search website although they are not indexed there. This webinar will cover different methods of searching within and accessing these valuable records.
The Registry of Deeds based in Dublin has been in existence since 1704 and manages the legal registration of property. Less well known is that it is also a repository for genealogical treasures such as wills, property leases and marriage agreements. People named in these records include the principal parties and also wider family members and witnesses. It is also possible to find records by location. These records are available as microfilms on the Family Search website although they are not indexed there. This webinar will cover different methods of searching within and accessing these valuable records.
Fri, April 14 2023: 12:00 UTC
Advanced
1:27:48
2.2K views
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Hints & Tips for Solving Irish Cases of Unknown Parentage Using DNA
There are many examples of Unknown Parentage cases in Ireland – illegal adoptees, a foundling grandparent, or simply an Irish Brick Wall. This talk explores the approach to solving these cases, the challenges faced with Irish records, and some hints & tips to overcome them using DNA.
There are many examples of Unknown Parentage cases in Ireland – illegal adoptees, a foundling grandparent, or simply an Irish Brick Wall. This talk explores the approach to solving these cases, the challenges faced with Irish records, and some hints & tips to overcome them using DNA.
Wed, February 8 2023: 19:00 UTC
1:33:11
2.0K views
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Irish Emigration to North America: Before, during and after Famine
Identify push factors to emigration (internal issues influencing emigration): Identify pull factors to emigration (external forces encouraging emigration) • Discuss factors and resources for each time period • Emigration pre-1717 • Scots-Irish (1717 – 1783) • Revolutionary War to the Famine (1783-1845) • Famine years and after • How to use to find places of origin
Identify push factors to emigration (internal issues influencing emigration): Identify pull factors to emigration (external forces encouraging emigration) • Discuss factors and resources for each time period • Emigration pre-1717 • Scots-Irish (1717 – 1783) • Revolutionary War to the Famine (1783-1845) • Famine years and after • How to use to find places of origin
Wed, June 22 2022: 18:00 UTC
47:16
966 views
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Who were the Scots-Irish?
Known in their homeland as Ulster-Scots, these mainly Lowland Scots left their homeland and settled in Ulster during the Plantation, sometimes staying only for a few generations and then many made their way to the New World. Why did these Scots come to Ulster and why did they then subsequently leave? What were the push and pull factors? Why did Presbyterian ministers have such sway over these people? We will look at the perils they faced on their transatlantic journey and what they found when they arrived in the new world. We will examine the range of records and sources where you may find your Ulster-Scots ancestors and that can tell you more about this pioneering ethnic group that produced a number of US Presidents and millions of descendants worldwide today.
Known in their homeland as Ulster-Scots, these mainly Lowland Scots left their homeland and settled in Ulster during the Plantation, sometimes staying only for a few generations and then many made their way to the New World. Why did these Scots come to Ulster and why did they then subsequently leave? What were the push and pull factors? Why did Presbyterian ministers have such sway over these people? We will look at the perils they faced on their transatlantic journey and what they found when they arrived in the new world. We will examine the range of records and sources where you may find your Ulster-Scots ancestors and that can tell you more about this pioneering ethnic group that produced a number of US Presidents and millions of descendants worldwide today.
Fri, April 8 2022: 9:00 UTC
1:01:08
642 views
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Finding your ancestors in Irish land valuation records
The Tithe records, the Townland Valuation and Griffith’s Primary Valuation records are used as Census substitutes for 19th century Ireland. Griffith’s Valuation was also updated on a regular basis up to the 1930’s and we’ll look at those records too. This webinar will cover the key elements of each record, teasing out valuable information, along with where you can access these records. We’ll include search tips and techniques and use a case study to trace a family home from the early 19th century up to the present day, including how to pinpoint your ancestors house on a map and discover if it is still standing today.
The Tithe records, the Townland Valuation and Griffith’s Primary Valuation records are used as Census substitutes for 19th century Ireland. Griffith’s Valuation was also updated on a regular basis up to the 1930’s and we’ll look at those records too. This webinar will cover the key elements of each record, teasing out valuable information, along with where you can access these records. We’ll include search tips and techniques and use a case study to trace a family home from the early 19th century up to the present day, including how to pinpoint your ancestors house on a map and discover if it is still standing today.
Thu, March 24 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:25:00
1.3K views
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‘Hidden Treasures’: Discovering Local Sources in Your Irish Research
When many start their Irish family history research they often head straight for the larger national repositories and their collections. Census records and parish registers are a great starting point for our research but don’t always help you in breaking through those brick walls. What many overlook when researching their Irish family history is the treasure trove of local repositories and the records they contain. These include street directories, cemetery registers, maps, school rolls, workhouse records and even personal family archives. The majority of Irish counties on both sides of the border have their own dedicated county library and archive which are run by local councils. This webinar will examine some of the records contained in local repositories and how best to use them for genealogical research.
When many start their Irish family history research they often head straight for the larger national repositories and their collections. Census records and parish registers are a great starting point for our research but don’t always help you in breaking through those brick walls. What many overlook when researching their Irish family history is the treasure trove of local repositories and the records they contain. These include street directories, cemetery registers, maps, school rolls, workhouse records and even personal family archives. The majority of Irish counties on both sides of the border have their own dedicated county library and archive which are run by local councils. This webinar will examine some of the records contained in local repositories and how best to use them for genealogical research.
Wed, March 9 2022: 19:00 UTC
56:19
555 views
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Getting the Most out of the Irish Census
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
Sat, November 27 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:23:25
1.8K views
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My ancestors were Irish – or were they?
The webinar examines the history and origins of Irish surnames – native Irish, Scottish, English, Welsh, Huguenot, Viking, Gallowglass and Jewish. If you don’t know where in Ireland your ancestors originated, we’ll include tips to help you to narrow down the location. First names often followed a traditional naming pattern…
The webinar examines the history and origins of Irish surnames – native Irish, Scottish, English, Welsh, Huguenot, Viking, Gallowglass and Jewish. If you don’t know where in Ireland your ancestors originated, we’ll include tips to help you to narrow down the location. First names often followed a traditional naming pattern…
Fri, October 15 2021: 18:00 UTC
1:06:29
451 views
CC
British and Irish Given Names – Part 2
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Fri, September 10 2021: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (100)
Wed, June 5 2024: 2:00 UTC
Four Further Sources for New Zealand Family History
Wed, June 5 2024: 2:00 UTC
Explore your New Zealand family history a little further and add to your family story.
Explore your New Zealand family history a little further and add to your family story.
Wed, June 5 2024: 2:00 UTC
Wed, June 5 2024: 18:00 UTC
Bridging the Gaps: Using DNA to get results in Eastern Europe
Wed, June 5 2024: 18:00 UTC
Family historians researching in Poland and Ukraine have to deal with gaps in records that could make progress next to impossible. Thanks to genetic genealogy, we can bridge those gaps. Geographic clues from your matches might get you looking in the right direction. This session includes some DNA success stories, based on geography and backed by documented research. It also offers pointers on how to get more value from your tests.
Family historians researching in Poland and Ukraine have to deal with gaps in records that could make progress next to impossible. Thanks to genetic genealogy, we can bridge those gaps. Geographic clues from your matches might get you looking in the right direction. This session includes some DNA success stories, based on geography and backed by documented research. It also offers pointers on how to get more value from your tests.
Wed, June 5 2024: 18:00 UTC
Thu, June 13 2024: 0:00 UTC
Puerto Rican research
Thu, June 13 2024: 0:00 UTC
Researching Puerto Rican ancestors is a unique experience, requiring a knowledge of both Latin American and North American record types and strategies. We’ll talk basics about finding your hometown and what records can help you trace your ancestry on both sides of the sea.
Researching Puerto Rican ancestors is a unique experience, requiring a knowledge of both Latin American and North American record types and strategies. We’ll talk basics about finding your hometown and what records can help you trace your ancestry on both sides of the sea.
Thu, June 13 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Juneteenth–How Emancipation Came to Texas and How We Celebrate
Wed, June 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
This lecture details the true story of how freedom finally came to Texas more than 2 years after the effective date of the Emancipation Proclamation. Common myths will be replaced with the truth of the events that occurred and the atmosphere of the surrounding Galveston community, including the presence of United States Colored Troops among the Union soldiers who arrived to enforce emancipation for over 300,000 enslaved people of Texas. Finally, it follows the evolution of celebrations of emancipation beginning with spontaneous celebrations that occurred in 1865 on the docks of the Galveston Wharf, to the first documented citywide celebration in Galveston, to today’s recognition of Juneteenth as an important historical event celebrated throughout the nation and even the world.
This lecture details the true story of how freedom finally came to Texas more than 2 years after the effective date of the Emancipation Proclamation. Common myths will be replaced with the truth of the events that occurred and the atmosphere of the surrounding Galveston community, including the presence of United States Colored Troops among the Union soldiers who arrived to enforce emancipation for over 300,000 enslaved people of Texas. Finally, it follows the evolution of celebrations of emancipation beginning with spontaneous celebrations that occurred in 1865 on the docks of the Galveston Wharf, to the first documented citywide celebration in Galveston, to today’s recognition of Juneteenth as an important historical event celebrated throughout the nation and even the world.
Wed, June 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Tue, June 25 2024: 18:00 UTC
Finding Your Canadian Ancestors on MyHeritage
Tue, June 25 2024: 18:00 UTC
This session will show how MyHeritage can help you find your Canadian ancestors through filters while searching through the records. A list of which Canadian records are available will be provided.
This session will show how MyHeritage can help you find your Canadian ancestors through filters while searching through the records. A list of which Canadian records are available will be provided.
Tue, June 25 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, June 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Kentucky and Virginia Tax Lists – 5 ½ Strategies for Identifying That Elusive Early Southerner
Wed, June 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Kentucky and Virginia have some of the most complete tax lists in the United States. Their value in research often goes unrecognized by even the experienced researcher. Tax lists can be a primary tool for solving difficult research problems and are invaluable when used with other records. Learn how to access original records, to best organize them for study, and to interpret their meaning. The lecture will use case studies to show their use in tracking individuals across time, estimating birth dates and death dates, separating individuals of the same name, determining the identity of other family members, and using them as substitutes for deeds, court records, and estate records in burned counties.
Kentucky and Virginia have some of the most complete tax lists in the United States. Their value in research often goes unrecognized by even the experienced researcher. Tax lists can be a primary tool for solving difficult research problems and are invaluable when used with other records. Learn how to access original records, to best organize them for study, and to interpret their meaning. The lecture will use case studies to show their use in tracking individuals across time, estimating birth dates and death dates, separating individuals of the same name, determining the identity of other family members, and using them as substitutes for deeds, court records, and estate records in burned counties.
Wed, June 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Thu, July 11 2024: 0:00 UTC
Chinese Immigrants in the South
Thu, July 11 2024: 0:00 UTC
A little-known part of American history is the Asian immigrants who settled in the South in the 1800s and 1900s. Some were brought to work in agriculture, others established groceries and other businesses. Under Jim Crow segregation, they had different statuses as “Colored” or “White” depending on where they lived and the time.
A little-known part of American history is the Asian immigrants who settled in the South in the 1800s and 1900s. Some were brought to work in agriculture, others established groceries and other businesses. Under Jim Crow segregation, they had different statuses as “Colored” or “White” depending on where they lived and the time.
Thu, July 11 2024: 0:00 UTC
Fri, July 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Researching Cornish Ancestors
Fri, July 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Discover the key resources available for researching Cornish ancestry. Learn about the different archives in Cornwall, what they hold and how to access their collections. Find out which Cornish records are available online and where to find them. Hear about the finding aids and local groups that can help with your research, and get a better understanding of how key features of Cornish history like Methodism, mining and migration shaped Cornish family histories. Whether you are researching from afar or planning to visit Cornwall, this talk will help you with starting to research your Cornish ancestors. Please note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Discover the key resources available for researching Cornish ancestry. Learn about the different archives in Cornwall, what they hold and how to access their collections. Find out which Cornish records are available online and where to find them. Hear about the finding aids and local groups that can help with your research, and get a better understanding of how key features of Cornish history like Methodism, mining and migration shaped Cornish family histories. Whether you are researching from afar or planning to visit Cornwall, this talk will help you with starting to research your Cornish ancestors. Please note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Fri, July 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, July 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Putting Them in Their Place: Understanding Localities for Your Mexican & Colonial Spanish Ancestors
Fri, July 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Familiarity with church and civil jurisdictions helps us make better sense of records we find for our Mexican ancestors, helps us know where to look for records that pertain to a particular place and time, and helps us trace evolving jurisdictional borders through time. Knowing where and how to find historical and background information about different Mexican localities helps you dig deeper into the lives of your ancestors. Learn about essential reference tools and strategies that will help you identify and learn more about the localities in which your ancestors lived and worked.
Familiarity with church and civil jurisdictions helps us make better sense of records we find for our Mexican ancestors, helps us know where to look for records that pertain to a particular place and time, and helps us trace evolving jurisdictional borders through time. Knowing where and how to find historical and background information about different Mexican localities helps you dig deeper into the lives of your ancestors. Learn about essential reference tools and strategies that will help you identify and learn more about the localities in which your ancestors lived and worked.
Fri, July 19 2024: 18:00 UTC