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56:19
151 views
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Getting the Most out of the Irish Census
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
Sat, November 27 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:23:25
1.7K views
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My ancestors were Irish – or were they?
The webinar examines the history and origins of Irish surnames – native Irish, Scottish, English, Welsh, Huguenot, Viking, Gallowglass and Jewish. If you don’t know where in Ireland your ancestors originated, we’ll include tips to help you to narrow down the location. First names often followed a traditional naming pattern…
The webinar examines the history and origins of Irish surnames – native Irish, Scottish, English, Welsh, Huguenot, Viking, Gallowglass and Jewish. If you don’t know where in Ireland your ancestors originated, we’ll include tips to help you to narrow down the location. First names often followed a traditional naming pattern…
Fri, October 15 2021: 18:00 UTC
1:06:29
414 views
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British and Irish Given Names – Part 2
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Fri, September 10 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:23:14
5.1K views
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Using Irish newspapers and other printed material
Newspapers are a great source of information about our ancestors, but how do we know what Irish newspapers are available and how can we access them? This webinar will include finding aids for newspapers to track down our Irish ancestors including the major repositories where they may be found. We'll…
Newspapers are a great source of information about our ancestors, but how do we know what Irish newspapers are available and how can we access them? This webinar will include finding aids for newspapers to track down our Irish ancestors including the major repositories where they may be found. We'll…
Fri, July 16 2021: 0:00 UTC
50:05
3.9K views
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Townlands, Parishes and Baronies – understanding land administrative divisions in Ireland
The townland, often with different and inconsistent spellings, is unique to Ireland and is a key feature of helping to tie down where your Irish ancestor came from. To confuse matters there are often townlands of the same name in different parts of the country, sometimes even in the same…
The townland, often with different and inconsistent spellings, is unique to Ireland and is a key feature of helping to tie down where your Irish ancestor came from. To confuse matters there are often townlands of the same name in different parts of the country, sometimes even in the same…
Fri, April 9 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:22:51
Genealogical Treasures in Irish Archives
An enormous variety of Irish manuscripts tell the stories of our ancestors. Parish registers, census returns, Griffith’s Valuation, and civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths provide a great beginning for Irish family history research. However, a careful search of record repositories in the Republic of Ireland and the United…
An enormous variety of Irish manuscripts tell the stories of our ancestors. Parish registers, census returns, Griffith’s Valuation, and civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths provide a great beginning for Irish family history research. However, a careful search of record repositories in the Republic of Ireland and the United…
Tue, June 16 2020: 0:00 UTC
1:24:46
18.5K views
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Effective Use of GENUKI: England’s Largest Free Genealogy website
Learn how to effectively use the largest free website for British Isles research. Understand how the site is organized and to find the many resources on the site. Plus see how to find its gems for specific local research.
Learn how to effectively use the largest free website for British Isles research. Understand how the site is organized and to find the many resources on the site. Plus see how to find its gems for specific local research.
Wed, January 29 2020: 0:00 UTC
1:21:36
20.6K views
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How to trace your UK ancestry
From the comfort of your home (outside the UK), trying to uncover your roots (whether in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales) can be an extremely challenging task. However, it is far from impossible with a plethora of information available online from books to databases, transcriptions to images, photographs and other…
From the comfort of your home (outside the UK), trying to uncover your roots (whether in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales) can be an extremely challenging task. However, it is far from impossible with a plethora of information available online from books to databases, transcriptions to images, photographs and other…
Wed, December 18 2019: 0:00 UTC
59:29
1.2K views
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Irish Genealogies & DNA: Back into the Mythological Past
When people research their Irish family history and ancestry, their surname is probably the most important part of their identity.
When people research their Irish family history and ancestry, their surname is probably the most important part of their identity.
Sat, October 19 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:15:38
4.5K views
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Are you Lost? Using Maps, Gazetteers and Directories for British Isles Research
Learn what maps, gazetteers and directories are available for researching your ancestors in the British Isles. Learn from examples how to make good use of these tools to find where your ancestors are, what they did, when, where, and why they may have moved.
Learn what maps, gazetteers and directories are available for researching your ancestors in the British Isles. Learn from examples how to make good use of these tools to find where your ancestors are, what they did, when, where, and why they may have moved.
Tue, September 3 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:08:45
2.0K views
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Planning Your Irish Research Trip
This presentation will provide an overview of the various Irish repositories and offer advice on just how how you can get the most out of them.
This presentation will provide an overview of the various Irish repositories and offer advice on just how how you can get the most out of them.
Fri, March 15 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:31:24
1.7K views
CC
Examining Migration & Researching Migrants in the British Isles
In this presentation we shall examine the reasons for migration and focus on the individual migration groups coming to the British Isles. The United Kingdom is in an interesting position in that it sits within Europe and yet also has been a focal point of Empire, some of which influenced…
In this presentation we shall examine the reasons for migration and focus on the individual migration groups coming to the British Isles. The United Kingdom is in an interesting position in that it sits within Europe and yet also has been a focal point of Empire, some of which influenced…
Wed, September 12 2018: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (110)
Wed, February 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Education in Australia
Wed, February 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Tracking the movement of ancestors in Australia can be difficult without available census records. However, there are numerous record alternatives, one of which is school admission registers as children are recorded each year, with details including parent’s names and dates of entry and exit. Industrial or trade schools, universities, religious schools and others can also present information not found elsewhere.
Tracking the movement of ancestors in Australia can be difficult without available census records. However, there are numerous record alternatives, one of which is school admission registers as children are recorded each year, with details including parent’s names and dates of entry and exit. Industrial or trade schools, universities, religious schools and others can also present information not found elsewhere.
Wed, February 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Fri, February 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
The Trifecta: The Secret Sauce of Researching the Formerly Enslaved
Fri, February 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Genealogists and family historians alike have spent decades looking for a tried and true method for unearthing slaveholders of those enslaved prior to 1865. Learn how three crucial record sets (Civil War Pensions, the Freedmen’s Bureau, and Probates/Successions) can become just the wrecking ball needed to obliterate brick walls related to slavery.
Genealogists and family historians alike have spent decades looking for a tried and true method for unearthing slaveholders of those enslaved prior to 1865. Learn how three crucial record sets (Civil War Pensions, the Freedmen’s Bureau, and Probates/Successions) can become just the wrecking ball needed to obliterate brick walls related to slavery.
Fri, February 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Thu, February 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Researching in Colonial New England
Thu, February 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Researching ancestors who lived in colonial New England can be challenging. This webinar begins by tracing settlement patterns, setting the stage for understanding key records and where to find them. For the 17th century, many unique published resources exist to help the family researcher. During the colonial years, several conflicts such as King Philip’s War and the Seven Years War affected settlement and thus the surviving records. The 18th century culminated in the Revolutionary War, but also saw the continued growth of settlement and ultimately resources for the family historian.
Ann Lawthers
Researching ancestors who lived in colonial New England can be challenging. This webinar begins by tracing settlement patterns, setting the stage for understanding key records and where to find them. For the 17th century, many unique published resources exist to help the family researcher. During the colonial years, several conflicts such as King Philip’s War and the Seven Years War affected settlement and thus the surviving records. The 18th century culminated in the Revolutionary War, but also saw the continued growth of settlement and ultimately resources for the family historian.
Thu, February 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Fri, February 18 2022: 19:00 UTC
Genealogical Gold in British Columbia
Fri, February 18 2022: 19:00 UTC
The land now known as British Columbia has been inhabited for many centuries, but most genealogical records started after the 1858 Gold Rush, which prompted many arrivals from California. Today, the province leads the rest of Canada in its commitment to making available a comprehensive collection of valuable resources. This session will enable researchers to make the most of those sources, and build a better understanding of your family’s connections to British Columbia.
The land now known as British Columbia has been inhabited for many centuries, but most genealogical records started after the 1858 Gold Rush, which prompted many arrivals from California. Today, the province leads the rest of Canada in its commitment to making available a comprehensive collection of valuable resources. This session will enable researchers to make the most of those sources, and build a better understanding of your family’s connections to British Columbia.
Fri, February 18 2022: 19:00 UTC
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Exploring the new 1921 UK Census
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Fri, March 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Documenting, Organizing, and Analyzing Plantation Enslaved Persons
Fri, March 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Keeping track of hundreds of enslaved persons can be an overwhelming task. This lecture will offer suggestions for organizing and analyzing enslaved persons’ information using spreadsheets.
Keeping track of hundreds of enslaved persons can be an overwhelming task. This lecture will offer suggestions for organizing and analyzing enslaved persons’ information using spreadsheets.
Fri, March 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Wed, March 9 2022: 19:00 UTC
‘Hidden Treasures’: Discovering Local Sources in Your Irish Research
Wed, March 9 2022: 19:00 UTC
When many start their Irish family history research they often head straight for the larger national repositories and their collections. Census records and parish registers are a great starting point for our research but don’t always help you in breaking through those brick walls. What many overlook when researching their Irish family history is the treasure trove of local repositories and the records they contain. These include street directories, cemetery registers, maps, school rolls, workhouse records and even personal family archives. The majority of Irish counties on both sides of the border have their own dedicated county library and archive which are run by local councils. This webinar will examine some of the records contained in local repositories and how best to use them for genealogical research.
When many start their Irish family history research they often head straight for the larger national repositories and their collections. Census records and parish registers are a great starting point for our research but don’t always help you in breaking through those brick walls. What many overlook when researching their Irish family history is the treasure trove of local repositories and the records they contain. These include street directories, cemetery registers, maps, school rolls, workhouse records and even personal family archives. The majority of Irish counties on both sides of the border have their own dedicated county library and archive which are run by local councils. This webinar will examine some of the records contained in local repositories and how best to use them for genealogical research.
Wed, March 9 2022: 19:00 UTC
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Identifying Unnamed Free Born African Americans – A DNA Case Study
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Identifying unnamed individuals using a Research Plan incorporating genetic evidence takes creativity and patience. This session deconstructs a case study using Genealogy Standards to align and correlate DNA results and fragmentary records for African American families, beginning in 1812 in Virginia and North Carolina.
Identifying unnamed individuals using a Research Plan incorporating genetic evidence takes creativity and patience. This session deconstructs a case study using Genealogy Standards to align and correlate DNA results and fragmentary records for African American families, beginning in 1812 in Virginia and North Carolina.
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Fri, March 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Mexican Catholic Parish Records, Part II: Pre-Marital Investigations, Marriages & Dispensations
Fri, March 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Spanish colonial and Mexican Catholic marriage records are rich in genealogical information. This session will discuss the laws, customs, and significance of pre-marital investigations, dispensations, and marriage ceremony records, as well as where to find and how to analyze them.
Spanish colonial and Mexican Catholic marriage records are rich in genealogical information. This session will discuss the laws, customs, and significance of pre-marital investigations, dispensations, and marriage ceremony records, as well as where to find and how to analyze them.
Fri, March 18 2022: 18:00 UTC