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1:33:11
1.3K views
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Irish Emigration to North America: Before, during and after Famine
Identify push factors to emigration (internal issues influencing emigration): Identify pull factors to emigration (external forces encouraging emigration) • Discuss factors and resources for each time period • Emigration pre-1717 • Scots-Irish (1717 – 1783) • Revolutionary War to the Famine (1783-1845) • Famine years and after • How to use to find places of origin
Identify push factors to emigration (internal issues influencing emigration): Identify pull factors to emigration (external forces encouraging emigration) • Discuss factors and resources for each time period • Emigration pre-1717 • Scots-Irish (1717 – 1783) • Revolutionary War to the Famine (1783-1845) • Famine years and after • How to use to find places of origin
Wed, June 22 2022: 18:00 UTC
47:16
783 views
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Who were the Scots-Irish?
Known in their homeland as Ulster-Scots, these mainly Lowland Scots left their homeland and settled in Ulster during the Plantation, sometimes staying only for a few generations and then many made their way to the New World. Why did these Scots come to Ulster and why did they then subsequently leave? What were the push and pull factors? Why did Presbyterian ministers have such sway over these people? We will look at the perils they faced on their transatlantic journey and what they found when they arrived in the new world. We will examine the range of records and sources where you may find your Ulster-Scots ancestors and that can tell you more about this pioneering ethnic group that produced a number of US Presidents and millions of descendants worldwide today.
Known in their homeland as Ulster-Scots, these mainly Lowland Scots left their homeland and settled in Ulster during the Plantation, sometimes staying only for a few generations and then many made their way to the New World. Why did these Scots come to Ulster and why did they then subsequently leave? What were the push and pull factors? Why did Presbyterian ministers have such sway over these people? We will look at the perils they faced on their transatlantic journey and what they found when they arrived in the new world. We will examine the range of records and sources where you may find your Ulster-Scots ancestors and that can tell you more about this pioneering ethnic group that produced a number of US Presidents and millions of descendants worldwide today.
Fri, April 8 2022: 9:00 UTC
1:01:08
560 views
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Finding your ancestors in Irish land valuation records
The Tithe records, the Townland Valuation and Griffith’s Primary Valuation records are used as Census substitutes for 19th century Ireland. Griffith’s Valuation was also updated on a regular basis up to the 1930’s and we’ll look at those records too. This webinar will cover the key elements of each record, teasing out valuable information, along with where you can access these records. We’ll include search tips and techniques and use a case study to trace a family home from the early 19th century up to the present day, including how to pinpoint your ancestors house on a map and discover if it is still standing today.
The Tithe records, the Townland Valuation and Griffith’s Primary Valuation records are used as Census substitutes for 19th century Ireland. Griffith’s Valuation was also updated on a regular basis up to the 1930’s and we’ll look at those records too. This webinar will cover the key elements of each record, teasing out valuable information, along with where you can access these records. We’ll include search tips and techniques and use a case study to trace a family home from the early 19th century up to the present day, including how to pinpoint your ancestors house on a map and discover if it is still standing today.
Thu, March 24 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:25:00
1.2K views
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‘Hidden Treasures’: Discovering Local Sources in Your Irish Research
When many start their Irish family history research they often head straight for the larger national repositories and their collections. Census records and parish registers are a great starting point for our research but don’t always help you in breaking through those brick walls. What many overlook when researching their Irish family history is the treasure trove of local repositories and the records they contain. These include street directories, cemetery registers, maps, school rolls, workhouse records and even personal family archives. The majority of Irish counties on both sides of the border have their own dedicated county library and archive which are run by local councils. This webinar will examine some of the records contained in local repositories and how best to use them for genealogical research.
When many start their Irish family history research they often head straight for the larger national repositories and their collections. Census records and parish registers are a great starting point for our research but don’t always help you in breaking through those brick walls. What many overlook when researching their Irish family history is the treasure trove of local repositories and the records they contain. These include street directories, cemetery registers, maps, school rolls, workhouse records and even personal family archives. The majority of Irish counties on both sides of the border have their own dedicated county library and archive which are run by local councils. This webinar will examine some of the records contained in local repositories and how best to use them for genealogical research.
Wed, March 9 2022: 19:00 UTC
56:19
185 views
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Getting the Most out of the Irish Census
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
Sat, November 27 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:23:25
1.8K views
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My ancestors were Irish – or were they?
The webinar examines the history and origins of Irish surnames – native Irish, Scottish, English, Welsh, Huguenot, Viking, Gallowglass and Jewish. If you don’t know where in Ireland your ancestors originated, we’ll include tips to help you to narrow down the location. First names often followed a traditional naming pattern…
The webinar examines the history and origins of Irish surnames – native Irish, Scottish, English, Welsh, Huguenot, Viking, Gallowglass and Jewish. If you don’t know where in Ireland your ancestors originated, we’ll include tips to help you to narrow down the location. First names often followed a traditional naming pattern…
Fri, October 15 2021: 18:00 UTC
1:06:29
427 views
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British and Irish Given Names – Part 2
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Fri, September 10 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:23:14
5.2K views
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Using Irish newspapers and other printed material
Newspapers are a great source of information about our ancestors, but how do we know what Irish newspapers are available and how can we access them? This webinar will include finding aids for newspapers to track down our Irish ancestors including the major repositories where they may be found. We'll…
Newspapers are a great source of information about our ancestors, but how do we know what Irish newspapers are available and how can we access them? This webinar will include finding aids for newspapers to track down our Irish ancestors including the major repositories where they may be found. We'll…
Fri, July 16 2021: 0:00 UTC
50:05
3.9K views
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Townlands, Parishes and Baronies – understanding land administrative divisions in Ireland
The townland, often with different and inconsistent spellings, is unique to Ireland and is a key feature of helping to tie down where your Irish ancestor came from. To confuse matters there are often townlands of the same name in different parts of the country, sometimes even in the same…
The townland, often with different and inconsistent spellings, is unique to Ireland and is a key feature of helping to tie down where your Irish ancestor came from. To confuse matters there are often townlands of the same name in different parts of the country, sometimes even in the same…
Fri, April 9 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:22:51
Genealogical Treasures in Irish Archives
An enormous variety of Irish manuscripts tell the stories of our ancestors. Parish registers, census returns, Griffith’s Valuation, and civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths provide a great beginning for Irish family history research. However, a careful search of record repositories in the Republic of Ireland and the United…
An enormous variety of Irish manuscripts tell the stories of our ancestors. Parish registers, census returns, Griffith’s Valuation, and civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths provide a great beginning for Irish family history research. However, a careful search of record repositories in the Republic of Ireland and the United…
Tue, June 16 2020: 0:00 UTC
1:24:46
18.6K views
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Effective Use of GENUKI: England’s Largest Free Genealogy website
Learn how to effectively use the largest free website for British Isles research. Understand how the site is organized and to find the many resources on the site. Plus see how to find its gems for specific local research.
Learn how to effectively use the largest free website for British Isles research. Understand how the site is organized and to find the many resources on the site. Plus see how to find its gems for specific local research.
Wed, January 29 2020: 0:00 UTC
1:21:36
20.6K views
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How to trace your UK ancestry
From the comfort of your home (outside the UK), trying to uncover your roots (whether in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales) can be an extremely challenging task. However, it is far from impossible with a plethora of information available online from books to databases, transcriptions to images, photographs and other…
From the comfort of your home (outside the UK), trying to uncover your roots (whether in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales) can be an extremely challenging task. However, it is far from impossible with a plethora of information available online from books to databases, transcriptions to images, photographs and other…
Wed, December 18 2019: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (77)
Thu, July 14 2022: 0:00 UTC
Montana Genealogy Treasures
Thu, July 14 2022: 0:00 UTC
Montana has 56 counties, and there’s a plethora of sources available across this 4th largest state. You’ll get a quick tour of Montana genealogy treasures online. Also, a tour of Montana sites and their specific genealogy databases available from archives and local history societies, along with a site-specific guide telling of the latest archives, museums, libraries and historical/genealogical societies open to aid in your search for ancestors, and ghost towns and mining camps, too! We’ll experience historical Montana maps available online, learn how to plan a specific trip to maximize the archives and local historical sites where other records (taxes, poll taxes, road taxes, poor taxes, boulevard districts, real estate additions, types of directories available per area, etc.), and note the specific genealogy and history societies/museums available to provide local helps. You’ll have access to a 30+ page (online) of the resources and references noted in the presentation.
Montana has 56 counties, and there’s a plethora of sources available across this 4th largest state. You’ll get a quick tour of Montana genealogy treasures online. Also, a tour of Montana sites and their specific genealogy databases available from archives and local history societies, along with a site-specific guide telling of the latest archives, museums, libraries and historical/genealogical societies open to aid in your search for ancestors, and ghost towns and mining camps, too! We’ll experience historical Montana maps available online, learn how to plan a specific trip to maximize the archives and local historical sites where other records (taxes, poll taxes, road taxes, poor taxes, boulevard districts, real estate additions, types of directories available per area, etc.), and note the specific genealogy and history societies/museums available to provide local helps. You’ll have access to a 30+ page (online) of the resources and references noted in the presentation.
Thu, July 14 2022: 0:00 UTC
Fri, July 15 2022: 18:00 UTC
Colonial Spanish & Mexican Censuses & Census Substitutes
Fri, July 15 2022: 18:00 UTC
Learn about the different types of census records and substitutes that can place your ancestors in New Spain or Mexico. This class will discuss why the records were created, where to find them, and what type of information they contain.
Learn about the different types of census records and substitutes that can place your ancestors in New Spain or Mexico. This class will discuss why the records were created, where to find them, and what type of information they contain.
Fri, July 15 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 3 2022: 2:00 UTC
Finding Mob: Researching Indigenous Australian Family History
Wed, August 3 2022: 2:00 UTC
Government Policy in Australia, particularly from Federation until the 1980s, meant that many Australians with indigenous roots have lost connection with family and community. Between adoption, state foster care, missions, hiding ethnicity, and relocation, it is often difficult to know where to start and haw to analyse records. This webinar will present how to start your research, looking at repositories, institutions, and community records that will assist, both indigenous specific and general, in compiling a genealogy or family history.
Government Policy in Australia, particularly from Federation until the 1980s, meant that many Australians with indigenous roots have lost connection with family and community. Between adoption, state foster care, missions, hiding ethnicity, and relocation, it is often difficult to know where to start and haw to analyse records. This webinar will present how to start your research, looking at repositories, institutions, and community records that will assist, both indigenous specific and general, in compiling a genealogy or family history.
Wed, August 3 2022: 2:00 UTC
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
African Americans Heading West
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
After the end of the Civil War in 1865, African Americans began leaving the areas where they had been enslaved. Many went to North to larger towns where work was more plentiful. But less discussed is that a number went West to farm, using the Homestead Act of 1862 to claim land of their own. Other settled in and helped develop some all-Black towns in Kansas and Oklahoma. Still others headed to the Pacific Coast for work. What can we find out about these settlers’ lives? Where can we find records?
After the end of the Civil War in 1865, African Americans began leaving the areas where they had been enslaved. Many went to North to larger towns where work was more plentiful. But less discussed is that a number went West to farm, using the Homestead Act of 1862 to claim land of their own. Other settled in and helped develop some all-Black towns in Kansas and Oklahoma. Still others headed to the Pacific Coast for work. What can we find out about these settlers’ lives? Where can we find records?
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
Fri, August 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Tracing Your Alberta Connections
Fri, August 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Alberta is unique among the 10 Canadian provinces. It was the last of the three Prairie provinces to be opened to homesteading, which meant land in that province was available just as quality homesteading land dried up in the United States. That brought a rush from south of the border, and the American influence is still felt today. There has been another mass influx of people eager to work in the energy industry. Many of the key sources used in researching your ancestors or cousins in Alberta are also unique, so local knowledge is essential. This session identifies those sources for you, and will help you get results in your searches.
Alberta is unique among the 10 Canadian provinces. It was the last of the three Prairie provinces to be opened to homesteading, which meant land in that province was available just as quality homesteading land dried up in the United States. That brought a rush from south of the border, and the American influence is still felt today. There has been another mass influx of people eager to work in the energy industry. Many of the key sources used in researching your ancestors or cousins in Alberta are also unique, so local knowledge is essential. This session identifies those sources for you, and will help you get results in your searches.
Fri, August 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
Researching Oklahoma Roots
Wed, August 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
The 46th state has a much longer history and more available records than most people realize. You may have discovered a possible link to Oklahoma, a Choctaw word meaning “red people.” Or perhaps you want to search for an elusive ancestor who may have hidden in Indian Territory or Oklahoma Territory, the “Twin Territories” that combined to become Oklahoma. This introduction to Oklahoma genealogical research will highlight the unique records that were created due to our unusual and exciting history.
The 46th state has a much longer history and more available records than most people realize. You may have discovered a possible link to Oklahoma, a Choctaw word meaning “red people.” Or perhaps you want to search for an elusive ancestor who may have hidden in Indian Territory or Oklahoma Territory, the “Twin Territories” that combined to become Oklahoma. This introduction to Oklahoma genealogical research will highlight the unique records that were created due to our unusual and exciting history.
Wed, August 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
Fri, September 2 2022: 18:00 UTC
Descendants of the Enslaved and Enslavers – Working Together to Discover Family
Fri, September 2 2022: 18:00 UTC
Sharon Batiste Gillins a descendant of enslaved ancestors and Cheri Hudson Passey a descendant of enslavers share how to overcome emotions and other obstacles to work together to connect families.
Sharon Batiste Gillins a descendant of enslaved ancestors and Cheri Hudson Passey a descendant of enslavers share how to overcome emotions and other obstacles to work together to connect families.
Fri, September 2 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, September 7 2022: 2:00 UTC
Shackles, shekels and shrapnel: the exodus to the Southern seas
Wed, September 7 2022: 2:00 UTC
Changes in Britain post the 1776 War of Independence, along with Capt James Cook’s mapping of New Zealand (1769) and New South Wales (1770), led to convicts and marines being sent to Botany Bay in 1787. So began British migration to the Southern Seas. Factors driving various waves of migration (economic, political, family ties, adventure) will be discussed, along with the effects the British Diasporas had on the Aboriginal and Māori Communities and their environment. Tips on tracing those missing down-under branches of your tree will also be covered.
Changes in Britain post the 1776 War of Independence, along with Capt James Cook’s mapping of New Zealand (1769) and New South Wales (1770), led to convicts and marines being sent to Botany Bay in 1787. So began British migration to the Southern Seas. Factors driving various waves of migration (economic, political, family ties, adventure) will be discussed, along with the effects the British Diasporas had on the Aboriginal and Māori Communities and their environment. Tips on tracing those missing down-under branches of your tree will also be covered.
Wed, September 7 2022: 2:00 UTC
Fri, September 9 2022: 18:00 UTC
Understanding and Using Scottish Kirk Session Records
Fri, September 9 2022: 18:00 UTC
Scottish Kirk Session records have recently come online at ScotlandsPeople. Learn what they represent within the Scottish court process, how they operated and what you will find in the records. Understand how to identify the records needed, how to search and where to go next.
Scottish Kirk Session records have recently come online at ScotlandsPeople. Learn what they represent within the Scottish court process, how they operated and what you will find in the records. Understand how to identify the records needed, how to search and where to go next.
Fri, September 9 2022: 18:00 UTC