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1:26:52
1.5K views
CC
Introduction to County Research in England
Discover the building blocks for researching in the English counties. This talk provides an overview of the key facts you need to know to start researching your English ancestors. Unravel why counties have come and gone with changing boundaries and different types of administrative entities. By understanding which records are stored at national or county level and some of the laws that influenced their collation, you will then be able to effectively concentrate on looking at the specific counties your ancestors came from. Learn about the finding aids and helpful resources to ensure you are set up to take a journey through English research supported by our English Research Series.
Mia Bennett
Discover the building blocks for researching in the English counties. This talk provides an overview of the key facts you need to know to start researching your English ancestors. Unravel why counties have come and gone with changing boundaries and different types of administrative entities. By understanding which records are stored at national or county level and some of the laws that influenced their collation, you will then be able to effectively concentrate on looking at the specific counties your ancestors came from. Learn about the finding aids and helpful resources to ensure you are set up to take a journey through English research supported by our English Research Series.
Fri, February 16 2024: 19:00 UTC
1:15:03
790 views
CC
Hidden in Plain Site: English and Welsh websites
This talk looks at free online sources that are often overlooked in preference for the main commercial websites. It is focused on English and Welsh resources. The talk gives ideas of where else you could go to expand your hunt for your ancestors’ life story.
Mia Bennett
This talk looks at free online sources that are often overlooked in preference for the main commercial websites. It is focused on English and Welsh resources. The talk gives ideas of where else you could go to expand your hunt for your ancestors’ life story.
Wed, April 26 2023: 18:00 UTC
50:47
1.4K views
CC
Liverpool: The Central Hub for Northern Europe’s 19th and 20th Century Emigration
Regular sailing schedules between Liverpool and North America began in 1818, and during the 19th century Liverpool became the primary port for emigrants from the British Isles, northern Europe and Russia to North America, Australia, and the rest of the British Empire. Learn how and why this came about, understand what the experience was like going to, in, and leaving from Liverpool. Learn how to identify, access, and use the records of the port and shipping that are available.
Regular sailing schedules between Liverpool and North America began in 1818, and during the 19th century Liverpool became the primary port for emigrants from the British Isles, northern Europe and Russia to North America, Australia, and the rest of the British Empire. Learn how and why this came about, understand what the experience was like going to, in, and leaving from Liverpool. Learn how to identify, access, and use the records of the port and shipping that are available.
Thu, April 13 2023: 23:00 UTC
1:25:12
Tips and Tools for Navigating the English Probate System
The probate system in England and Wales changed significantly in 1858. Learn how the English probate system worked before and after that change, see what records are available and why they are of value. Learn tips and tools for procedures which will simplify the search process, whether the ancestor’s location in England is known or unknown.
The probate system in England and Wales changed significantly in 1858. Learn how the English probate system worked before and after that change, see what records are available and why they are of value. Learn tips and tools for procedures which will simplify the search process, whether the ancestor’s location in England is known or unknown.
Wed, March 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
1:30:29
Lloyd’s of London: its history and its records for shipping
Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.
Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.
Wed, December 7 2022: 1:00 UTC
45:04
551 views
CC
Sons of the Soil: researching our British agricultural labouring ancestors
Every family has them, ancestors who worked on the land. How can we find out more about them, the farms where they worked and the lives that they led? This session covers a range of sources, many of them under-used, which will help to shed light on the working lives of our rural British ancestors.
Every family has them, ancestors who worked on the land. How can we find out more about them, the farms where they worked and the lives that they led? This session covers a range of sources, many of them under-used, which will help to shed light on the working lives of our rural British ancestors.
Fri, April 8 2022: 12:00 UTC
56:25
89 views
CC
Getting the best out of the online Local BMD indexes
This webinar was presented live during the 2022 Surname Society annual conference. Ian Hartas talk will cover some of the basic techniques in how to get the best out of local BMD sites and also cover a basic walk through on them to suit newcomers.
This webinar was presented live during the 2022 Surname Society annual conference. Ian Hartas talk will cover some of the basic techniques in how to get the best out of local BMD sites and also cover a basic walk through on them to suit newcomers.
Sat, March 19 2022: 17:00 UTC
56:18
206 views
CC
Using a Research Methodology for Family History
This webinar was presented live during the 2022 Surname Society annual conference. The sources we rely on for our family histories provide information, but the analysis of that information and formulation into proof requires a structured method. Currently there is little guidance on this for beginning and intermediate family historians, especially in the UK. This talk will discuss methodologies, what they are and why they are useful. It will introduce a research methodology and show how it can be used to successfully solve complex cases.
This webinar was presented live during the 2022 Surname Society annual conference. The sources we rely on for our family histories provide information, but the analysis of that information and formulation into proof requires a structured method. Currently there is little guidance on this for beginning and intermediate family historians, especially in the UK. This talk will discuss methodologies, what they are and why they are useful. It will introduce a research methodology and show how it can be used to successfully solve complex cases.
Sat, March 19 2022: 15:00 UTC
1:32:27
Exploring the new 1921 UK Census
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
1:31:27
1.4K views
CC
Effective Use of England’s National Archives Website
Learn how to effectively use the research tools, indexes and catalogs on this large website to find your ancestors and to put them into their correct historical context.
Learn how to effectively use the research tools, indexes and catalogs on this large website to find your ancestors and to put them into their correct historical context.
Fri, December 17 2021: 19:00 UTC
1:15:29
1.1K views
CC
Uncovering the lives of your London (England) ancestors
It can be quite daunting to find your ancestors who lived in the Greater London area as records are held at numerous archives. Parishes number in the hundreds and surprisingly, many Londoners in the 18th and 19th centuries were quite mobile. This presentation will take you through a variety of…
It can be quite daunting to find your ancestors who lived in the Greater London area as records are held at numerous archives. Parishes number in the hundreds and surprisingly, many Londoners in the 18th and 19th centuries were quite mobile. This presentation will take you through a variety of…
Wed, November 3 2021: 1:00 UTC
1:17:53
2.4K views
CC
British and Irish Given Names – Part 1
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Fri, September 10 2021: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (147)
Wed, March 6 2024: 1:00 UTC
Beyond the Church Register: Finding and using religious archives in Australia
Wed, March 6 2024: 1:00 UTC
The records of churches and congregations in Australia are spread across a range of different archival repositories at local, state and national levels. Come on a journey to find what records might help develop your family history and genealogy, where those records live, and how to access them.
The records of churches and congregations in Australia are spread across a range of different archival repositories at local, state and national levels. Come on a journey to find what records might help develop your family history and genealogy, where those records live, and how to access them.
Wed, March 6 2024: 1:00 UTC
Wed, March 6 2024: 19:00 UTC
Using DNA To Identify Irish Ancestral Locations
Wed, March 6 2024: 19:00 UTC
For many of us who have Irish ancestry, the major question is ‘but where in Ireland?’ Like millions of other descendants of Irish emigrants, Michelle Leonard has Irish ancestors who left Ireland in the 1840s-60s and on nearly all documents she can find for them their birthplaces were given simply as ‘Ireland’. In many cases traditional research is not able to narrow down exactly where in Ireland our ancestors lived and trying to trace them across the seas is often a ‘needle in a haystack’ endeavour. In this personal case study, Michelle will outline how she managed to identify exact locations in Ireland for her Irish lines using the power of DNA testing and will provide strategies and top tips that could help you do the same.
For many of us who have Irish ancestry, the major question is ‘but where in Ireland?’ Like millions of other descendants of Irish emigrants, Michelle Leonard has Irish ancestors who left Ireland in the 1840s-60s and on nearly all documents she can find for them their birthplaces were given simply as ‘Ireland’. In many cases traditional research is not able to narrow down exactly where in Ireland our ancestors lived and trying to trace them across the seas is often a ‘needle in a haystack’ endeavour. In this personal case study, Michelle will outline how she managed to identify exact locations in Ireland for her Irish lines using the power of DNA testing and will provide strategies and top tips that could help you do the same.
Wed, March 6 2024: 19:00 UTC
Fri, March 8 2024: 19:00 UTC
Researching in Cumberland and Westmorland
Fri, March 8 2024: 19:00 UTC
Learn all about the key resources available for researching ancestors in the counties of Cumberland and Westmorland. Discover the key archives covering these counties and how to use their catalogues and other resources. Find out where records can be found online both within the main commercial websites and other sites. Learn about key historical events that may impact your research in the ‘Lake Counties’. Investigate where else you can get help for researching here such as published resources and local and family history societies. At the end of this talk, you will be set up for starting your research on your Cumberland and Westmorland ancestors. Note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Learn all about the key resources available for researching ancestors in the counties of Cumberland and Westmorland. Discover the key archives covering these counties and how to use their catalogues and other resources. Find out where records can be found online both within the main commercial websites and other sites. Learn about key historical events that may impact your research in the ‘Lake Counties’. Investigate where else you can get help for researching here such as published resources and local and family history societies. At the end of this talk, you will be set up for starting your research on your Cumberland and Westmorland ancestors. Note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Fri, March 8 2024: 19:00 UTC
Thu, March 14 2024: 0:00 UTC
U.S. Synagogue Records as a Genealogical Resource
Thu, March 14 2024: 0:00 UTC
A primer on how to find synagogue records, what genealogical material they include, and what they look like. Finding synagogue records can be problematic and time consuming as there are errors in catalogs and a variety of ways materials are described. JewishGen’s Shul Records America, a finding aid pointing to the location of American synagogue records includes more than 650 collections held at over 60 repositories or websites, with about 20% including URLS for digitized materials. Not only a historical resource but important as modern-day synagogues merge or close, Shul Records America encourages congregations to preserve records with genealogical value.
A primer on how to find synagogue records, what genealogical material they include, and what they look like. Finding synagogue records can be problematic and time consuming as there are errors in catalogs and a variety of ways materials are described. JewishGen’s Shul Records America, a finding aid pointing to the location of American synagogue records includes more than 650 collections held at over 60 repositories or websites, with about 20% including URLS for digitized materials. Not only a historical resource but important as modern-day synagogues merge or close, Shul Records America encourages congregations to preserve records with genealogical value.
Thu, March 14 2024: 0:00 UTC
Fri, March 15 2024: 18:00 UTC
Top 10 Digital Repositories for Mexican Research
Fri, March 15 2024: 18:00 UTC
Are you looking for new repositories to advance your research in México? In this presentation, we will explore the top 10 websites for researching your Mexican ancestors, including where to find digitized original records, catalogs, regional histories, and much more from national and regional repositories.
Are you looking for new repositories to advance your research in México? In this presentation, we will explore the top 10 websites for researching your Mexican ancestors, including where to find digitized original records, catalogs, regional histories, and much more from national and regional repositories.
Fri, March 15 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, March 20 2024: 0:00 UTC
Maternal Threads Unwoven: Identifying Margareta’s Mother in 18th Century Sweden
Wed, March 20 2024: 0:00 UTC
In spite of birth entries for Margareta’s five siblings in Hishult, there was no record of her birth in the parish. Tax records quickly identified the father, and revealed multiple moves within a narrow span of time; however, identification of the mother remained elusive. No witnesses to births of the children provided clues; no household examinations existed. Coupling the understanding of broad context (naming patterns, inheritance laws, the calendar shift, etc.) with mtDNA and documentary evidence, the mother was identified and the lack of a records was explained.
In spite of birth entries for Margareta’s five siblings in Hishult, there was no record of her birth in the parish. Tax records quickly identified the father, and revealed multiple moves within a narrow span of time; however, identification of the mother remained elusive. No witnesses to births of the children provided clues; no household examinations existed. Coupling the understanding of broad context (naming patterns, inheritance laws, the calendar shift, etc.) with mtDNA and documentary evidence, the mother was identified and the lack of a records was explained.
Wed, March 20 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, March 27 2024: 18:00 UTC
Which Hans Jensen is Mine? Navigating Patronymics in Scandinavian Research
Wed, March 27 2024: 18:00 UTC
The majority of ancestral Scandinavians shared a small number of given names and surnames. Following ancestors without becoming mixed up in the patronymic pot can be a challenge. This webinar will provide guidance for focusing on your ancestor and eliminating other possible family lines. We will answer the most common questions regarding ancestral patronymics: what are they? why are they used? and how do I follow my family and not the neighbors?
The majority of ancestral Scandinavians shared a small number of given names and surnames. Following ancestors without becoming mixed up in the patronymic pot can be a challenge. This webinar will provide guidance for focusing on your ancestor and eliminating other possible family lines. We will answer the most common questions regarding ancestral patronymics: what are they? why are they used? and how do I follow my family and not the neighbors?
Wed, March 27 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, April 3 2024: 1:00 UTC
Non-Conformism in England and Wales
Wed, April 3 2024: 1:00 UTC
Do you know the difference between a Peculiar Baptist and an Anabaptist? What types of records the Quakers kept? What the Puritans believed? Understanding the background to and the beliefs of the multitude of non-conformist churches can give us an insight into our ancestors’ lives. Learning what records the various groups kept can give us a new lead for our research, or prevent us looking for records that never existed in the first place. This talk will not only tackle those questions, but also give a history of many of the non-conformist churches that existed in England and Wales.
Do you know the difference between a Peculiar Baptist and an Anabaptist? What types of records the Quakers kept? What the Puritans believed? Understanding the background to and the beliefs of the multitude of non-conformist churches can give us an insight into our ancestors’ lives. Learning what records the various groups kept can give us a new lead for our research, or prevent us looking for records that never existed in the first place. This talk will not only tackle those questions, but also give a history of many of the non-conformist churches that existed in England and Wales.
Wed, April 3 2024: 1:00 UTC
Wed, April 3 2024: 18:00 UTC
Solving a Virginia Mystery Using DNA
Wed, April 3 2024: 18:00 UTC
Family lore tells a different story than the records for the paternity of a southwest Virginia great-grandfather. Learn how DNA helps solve the mystery!
Family lore tells a different story than the records for the paternity of a southwest Virginia great-grandfather. Learn how DNA helps solve the mystery!
Wed, April 3 2024: 18:00 UTC