41
of
2,224 Webinars Clear filters
Sort by
Sort by
45:50
282 views
CC
My Top 5 Websites for Victorian research in Australia
Victoria was the colony that experienced the gold rushes of the 1850s. This presentation looks at websites that assist anyone trying to find relatives in Victoria in the 19th century into the 20th century.
Shauna Hicks
Victoria was the colony that experienced the gold rushes of the 1850s. This presentation looks at websites that assist anyone trying to find relatives in Victoria in the 19th century into the 20th century.
Fri, April 12 2024: 8:00 UTC
1:08:45
469 views
CC
Beyond the Church Register: Finding and using religious archives in Australia
The records of churches and congregations in Australia are spread across a range of different archival repositories at local, state and national levels. Come on a journey to find what records might help develop your family history and genealogy, where those records live, and how to access them.
The records of churches and congregations in Australia are spread across a range of different archival repositories at local, state and national levels. Come on a journey to find what records might help develop your family history and genealogy, where those records live, and how to access them.
Wed, March 6 2024: 1:00 UTC
1:08:15
849 views
CC
From Trial to Transformation: Building a Convict’s Life through multiple records and data sets
Exploring the life of a convict ancestor can be exciting but also a daunting task. This webinar leads participants through a methodical examination of the records available at various stages of a convict’s life from trial through to freedom. After developing a framework for investigation, case studies are then used to demonstrate the various records available and where to find them, including both within Australia and overseas. Issues such as record conflicts and understanding the broader social context will also be explored to more fully understand changes in terminology and record types.
Exploring the life of a convict ancestor can be exciting but also a daunting task. This webinar leads participants through a methodical examination of the records available at various stages of a convict’s life from trial through to freedom. After developing a framework for investigation, case studies are then used to demonstrate the various records available and where to find them, including both within Australia and overseas. Issues such as record conflicts and understanding the broader social context will also be explored to more fully understand changes in terminology and record types.
Wed, February 7 2024: 1:00 UTC
1:12:14
582 views
CC
A military heritage: Finding your British army lineage in pre-20th century records
Many Australians will have a soldier or sailor somewhere in their family tree, particularly from the 20th century onwards. Finding those ancestors who served in Australian contingents during World War One or Two for example, is a relatively straightforward process, mainly because the records are mostly available in Australian archives. However, once the search moves back into the 19th or 18th century, then it can become a more complicated puzzle. This presentation provides an overview of the military history of Europe during the 19th and 18th centuries and outlines the range of records which are available, such as those at The National Archives (UK) in particular as well as Australian archives and military museums and an increasing number of online resources. The wealth of detail will help reveal the life of your military ancestor and may even be able to take your research back into the 18th century.
Many Australians will have a soldier or sailor somewhere in their family tree, particularly from the 20th century onwards. Finding those ancestors who served in Australian contingents during World War One or Two for example, is a relatively straightforward process, mainly because the records are mostly available in Australian archives. However, once the search moves back into the 19th or 18th century, then it can become a more complicated puzzle. This presentation provides an overview of the military history of Europe during the 19th and 18th centuries and outlines the range of records which are available, such as those at The National Archives (UK) in particular as well as Australian archives and military museums and an increasing number of online resources. The wealth of detail will help reveal the life of your military ancestor and may even be able to take your research back into the 18th century.
Thu, January 11 2024: 1:00 UTC
56:48
293 views
CC
Can You Write a Wrong? Copyright in Australia
Knowing what we can freely use, without permission, in our family histories ensures that we are not infringing on the rights of others. For example, did you know that if you watch your grandmother make her secret pasta sauce, writing down the ingredients and methods she used, you have created your own ‘literary work’ which is now protected by copyright? (Just don’t tell Granny!) How then does copyright law apply to published and unpublished works? What is fair use and moral rights? Can a distant cousin use information in her family book that I have researched? This presentation will examine those aspects of Australia’s copyright law which apply to family historians and discusses ways we can comply with the law.
Knowing what we can freely use, without permission, in our family histories ensures that we are not infringing on the rights of others. For example, did you know that if you watch your grandmother make her secret pasta sauce, writing down the ingredients and methods she used, you have created your own ‘literary work’ which is now protected by copyright? (Just don’t tell Granny!) How then does copyright law apply to published and unpublished works? What is fair use and moral rights? Can a distant cousin use information in her family book that I have researched? This presentation will examine those aspects of Australia’s copyright law which apply to family historians and discusses ways we can comply with the law.
Wed, December 6 2023: 1:00 UTC
1:03:45
228 views
CC
Gold Fever and Finding Miners Down Under
This presentation examines the lure of gold discoveries in various Australian states in the 19th century. Many people travelled down under to try and make their fortunes but didn’t realise just how hard it was working on Australian gold fields. Mining records and newspapers can be used to trace miners and to understand their way of life.
Shauna Hicks
This presentation examines the lure of gold discoveries in various Australian states in the 19th century. Many people travelled down under to try and make their fortunes but didn’t realise just how hard it was working on Australian gold fields. Mining records and newspapers can be used to trace miners and to understand their way of life.
Wed, October 4 2023: 1:00 UTC
1:14:47
396 views
CC
How to Catch a Criminal: Finding Records for Your Rogue Relatives Downunder
Australia has a wealth of publicly available records for people who have interacted with the criminal justice system, be they criminals, suspects, victims of crime, witnesses in criminal cases, and law enforcement officials, but do you know how to find these records? This talk will do a deep dive into the available record sets, including mug shots, prison registers, criminal court records, inquests and coronial records, and Police Gazettes, among others.
Kristy Love
Australia has a wealth of publicly available records for people who have interacted with the criminal justice system, be they criminals, suspects, victims of crime, witnesses in criminal cases, and law enforcement officials, but do you know how to find these records? This talk will do a deep dive into the available record sets, including mug shots, prison registers, criminal court records, inquests and coronial records, and Police Gazettes, among others.
Wed, September 6 2023: 2:00 UTC
1:03:27
342 views
CC
Six Top Sites for Queensland Research
Let’s dive into six Queensland, Australia sites for your genealogical research.
Let’s dive into six Queensland, Australia sites for your genealogical research.
Wed, August 2 2023: 2:00 UTC
1:07:23
430 views
CC
Convicts: From Trial to Freedom
Convicts are amongst the best documented Australian early settlers. Learn how you can follow the passage of convict ancestors from the initial reports of their crimes, through trial and transportation and the documentation of their period as a convict in an Australian colony.
Kerry Farmer
Convicts are amongst the best documented Australian early settlers. Learn how you can follow the passage of convict ancestors from the initial reports of their crimes, through trial and transportation and the documentation of their period as a convict in an Australian colony.
Wed, May 3 2023: 2:00 UTC
52:01
375 views
CC
Australian indexes online for family history research you might not know
This class examines online indexes that are not available through the big subscription sites. Family history societies and volunteer groups have created unique resources only available through their websites. Often free to use or more details are included in a society membership.
Shauna Hicks
This class examines online indexes that are not available through the big subscription sites. Family history societies and volunteer groups have created unique resources only available through their websites. Often free to use or more details are included in a society membership.
Fri, April 14 2023: 9:00 UTC
47:06
165 views
CC
To Have but No Longer to Hold: Divorce in Australia
The first colony to introduce divorce was South Australia in 1858 to the last New South Wales in 1873. The requirements differed by colony. Each colony handled its own divorces until the Federal Matrimonial Causes Act 1959 provided 14 grounds for the grant of divorce, including adultery, desertion, cruelty, habitual drunkenness, imprisonment and insanity. To succeed on one of these grounds, a spouse had to prove marital fault. There was only one no-fault ground: separation for more than five years. It was not until the Family Law Act 1975 was passed by the Federal Parliament that a “no fault divorce” existed in Australia: imprisonment and insanity. To succeed on one of these grounds, a spouse had to prove marital fault. There was only one no-fault ground: separation for more than five years.
The first colony to introduce divorce was South Australia in 1858 to the last New South Wales in 1873. The requirements differed by colony. Each colony handled its own divorces until the Federal Matrimonial Causes Act 1959 provided 14 grounds for the grant of divorce, including adultery, desertion, cruelty, habitual drunkenness, imprisonment and insanity. To succeed on one of these grounds, a spouse had to prove marital fault. There was only one no-fault ground: separation for more than five years. It was not until the Family Law Act 1975 was passed by the Federal Parliament that a “no fault divorce” existed in Australia: imprisonment and insanity. To succeed on one of these grounds, a spouse had to prove marital fault. There was only one no-fault ground: separation for more than five years.
Fri, April 14 2023: 8:00 UTC
1:03:04
352 views
Looking for ‘Aliens’ Down Under: A Guide to Australian Naturalisation Records
Following the founding of the colony of Australia, individuals born in the British Empire were considered British subjects, irrespective of the nationality of their parents. Residents of Australia whose native place was outside of the British Empire were not afforded the same rights and privileges as British subjects. These rights, in particular the right to buy land and vote, could be conferred to an individual by a process known as naturalisation. This bureaucratic process generated multiple sets of records that contain a wealth of genealogical information. This talk will outline the complex history of naturalisation in Australia, the changing terminology used, how, when and why naturalisation records were created, and discuss the likely availability of records and for whom they may have been created.
Kristy Love
Following the founding of the colony of Australia, individuals born in the British Empire were considered British subjects, irrespective of the nationality of their parents. Residents of Australia whose native place was outside of the British Empire were not afforded the same rights and privileges as British subjects. These rights, in particular the right to buy land and vote, could be conferred to an individual by a process known as naturalisation. This bureaucratic process generated multiple sets of records that contain a wealth of genealogical information. This talk will outline the complex history of naturalisation in Australia, the changing terminology used, how, when and why naturalisation records were created, and discuss the likely availability of records and for whom they may have been created.
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (81)
Fri, July 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Putting Them in Their Place: Understanding Localities for Your Mexican & Colonial Spanish Ancestors
Fri, July 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Familiarity with church and civil jurisdictions helps us make better sense of records we find for our Mexican ancestors, helps us know where to look for records that pertain to a particular place and time, and helps us trace evolving jurisdictional borders through time. Knowing where and how to find historical and background information about different Mexican localities helps you dig deeper into the lives of your ancestors. Learn about essential reference tools and strategies that will help you identify and learn more about the localities in which your ancestors lived and worked.
Familiarity with church and civil jurisdictions helps us make better sense of records we find for our Mexican ancestors, helps us know where to look for records that pertain to a particular place and time, and helps us trace evolving jurisdictional borders through time. Knowing where and how to find historical and background information about different Mexican localities helps you dig deeper into the lives of your ancestors. Learn about essential reference tools and strategies that will help you identify and learn more about the localities in which your ancestors lived and worked.
Fri, July 19 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
Researching Oregon Trail Ancestors
Wed, July 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
The Oregon Trail extended approximately 2,000 miles from Independence, Missouri to Oregon City, Oregon from 1840 to 1869. More than 50,000 people traveled to Oregon and a great number died on the journey. This talk will cover resources for conducting research on the people and their lives along the trail.
The Oregon Trail extended approximately 2,000 miles from Independence, Missouri to Oregon City, Oregon from 1840 to 1869. More than 50,000 people traveled to Oregon and a great number died on the journey. This talk will cover resources for conducting research on the people and their lives along the trail.
Wed, July 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, August 2 2024: 18:00 UTC
African American Research 101 – Antebellum Era (Part 3 of 3)
Fri, August 2 2024: 18:00 UTC
This lecture will discuss how to get started in African American research. The objective of this presentation will be to research African Americans before the Civil War – either as an enslaved or free person. It will introduce Antebellum Era records such as: newspapers, slave schedules, church records, tax records, free people of color registers, plantation records, and probate records. It will also cover methodology for enslaved research.
This lecture will discuss how to get started in African American research. The objective of this presentation will be to research African Americans before the Civil War – either as an enslaved or free person. It will introduce Antebellum Era records such as: newspapers, slave schedules, church records, tax records, free people of color registers, plantation records, and probate records. It will also cover methodology for enslaved research.
Fri, August 2 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, August 9 2024: 18:00 UTC
English Occupation, Apprenticeship and Guild Records
Fri, August 9 2024: 18:00 UTC
Learn about apprenticeship, freeman and guild records and how they controlled your ancestor’s trade. Identify sources to put your ancestor into a true occupational context.
Learn about apprenticeship, freeman and guild records and how they controlled your ancestor’s trade. Identify sources to put your ancestor into a true occupational context.
Fri, August 9 2024: 18:00 UTC
Thu, August 15 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogy of East and West Prussia
Thu, August 15 2024: 0:00 UTC
This presentation discusses the turbulent history of the former German states of East Prussia and West Prussia, now part of Poland and Russia, and introduces resources for genealogical research in the region. The evolution of German culture in these two neighboring Prussian states was surprisingly divergent. Insight into the social and political history of these states is essential for successful research in the area.
This presentation discusses the turbulent history of the former German states of East Prussia and West Prussia, now part of Poland and Russia, and introduces resources for genealogical research in the region. The evolution of German culture in these two neighboring Prussian states was surprisingly divergent. Insight into the social and political history of these states is essential for successful research in the area.
Thu, August 15 2024: 0:00 UTC
Fri, August 16 2024: 18:00 UTC
Six MORE free websites for Ontario genealogists
Fri, August 16 2024: 18:00 UTC
You loved her last webinar on this topic and requested six more! In this webinar, Janice will introduce you to her next favourite online sources for Ontario family history.
You loved her last webinar on this topic and requested six more! In this webinar, Janice will introduce you to her next favourite online sources for Ontario family history.
Fri, August 16 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 28 2024: 2:00 UTC
Using MyHeritage for Family History Research in Australia
Wed, August 28 2024: 2:00 UTC
Looking for your ancestors Down Under? Aussie genealogist Shauna Hicks will show you how to use MyHeritage to access a vast array of resources and make new discoveries about your ancestors from Australia.
Shauna Hicks
Looking for your ancestors Down Under? Aussie genealogist Shauna Hicks will show you how to use MyHeritage to access a vast array of resources and make new discoveries about your ancestors from Australia.
Wed, August 28 2024: 2:00 UTC
Fri, September 6 2024: 18:00 UTC
Researching Your Birmingham Ancestors
Fri, September 6 2024: 18:00 UTC
Birmingham was the cradle of the Industrial Revolution and the world’s first manufacturing town. This talk will equip you to start your research on your Birmingham ancestors. Learn about the challenges of researching in Birmingham and discover the key archives and sources for genealogical records. Find out how key themes in the city’s history, such as migration, strong Roman Catholic and non-conformist traditions, and the rise of manufacturing, are reflected in genealogical records. Sources covered include legal and ecclesiastical archives, local government, business, institutions, societies and schools. Investigate where else you can get help for researching here such as the Family History Society. Note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Birmingham was the cradle of the Industrial Revolution and the world’s first manufacturing town. This talk will equip you to start your research on your Birmingham ancestors. Learn about the challenges of researching in Birmingham and discover the key archives and sources for genealogical records. Find out how key themes in the city’s history, such as migration, strong Roman Catholic and non-conformist traditions, and the rise of manufacturing, are reflected in genealogical records. Sources covered include legal and ecclesiastical archives, local government, business, institutions, societies and schools. Investigate where else you can get help for researching here such as the Family History Society. Note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.
Fri, September 6 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Luff In The Devon Cottages: Exploring A One-Place Study by Kirsty Gray
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Our ancestors were people, just like us. They were born, they lived, they died, they laughed, they cried, and they fell in love – or should that be luff…? Join people-finding wizard and genealogist Kirsty Gray on a journey through her one place study about the small Devon parishes of Luffincott and Tetcott; learn about the history of these villages, their inhabitants and their challenges, as Kirsty talks you through the trials and triumphs of conducting a one place study. This exploration of the past of a remote and rural part of Devon is sure to providing a fascinating window into the past and be a great example of the benefits conducting a one place study can bring.
Our ancestors were people, just like us. They were born, they lived, they died, they laughed, they cried, and they fell in love – or should that be luff…? Join people-finding wizard and genealogist Kirsty Gray on a journey through her one place study about the small Devon parishes of Luffincott and Tetcott; learn about the history of these villages, their inhabitants and their challenges, as Kirsty talks you through the trials and triumphs of conducting a one place study. This exploration of the past of a remote and rural part of Devon is sure to providing a fascinating window into the past and be a great example of the benefits conducting a one place study can bring.
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC