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1:02:05
The Many Wives of Howard William Lowe: Working with Social History to Glean Genealogical Insights (a 2023 Reisinger Lecture)
Genealogists are expected to conduct research not just reasonably exhaustively but also broadly. Understanding the social milieu of the specific time and place within which an individual lived is an essential element of broad research. A case study focusing on an early twentieth-century blue-collar worker in western Minnesota and his several wives illustrates how social history provides insights illuminating their lives. This class is presented live at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City as part of the Joy Reisinger Memorial Lecture Series and is being broadcasted by Legacy Family Tree Webinars.
Genealogists are expected to conduct research not just reasonably exhaustively but also broadly. Understanding the social milieu of the specific time and place within which an individual lived is an essential element of broad research. A case study focusing on an early twentieth-century blue-collar worker in western Minnesota and his several wives illustrates how social history provides insights illuminating their lives. This class is presented live at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City as part of the Joy Reisinger Memorial Lecture Series and is being broadcasted by Legacy Family Tree Webinars.
Fri, October 20 2023: 19:30 UTC
47:10
378 views
CC
Ancestral Ink: The Social History Behind a Tattoo
Oscar Philibert’s World War II draft card included a surprise, the description of a tattoo. That knowledge posed a challenge. What could Gena learn about this tattoo that would enhance his life story? This case study includes genealogical and social history resources that provide ideas for how genealogists can incorporate social history into the facts they find on a genealogically relevant record.
Oscar Philibert’s World War II draft card included a surprise, the description of a tattoo. That knowledge posed a challenge. What could Gena learn about this tattoo that would enhance his life story? This case study includes genealogical and social history resources that provide ideas for how genealogists can incorporate social history into the facts they find on a genealogically relevant record.
Fri, April 14 2023: 3:00 UTC
1:11:08
3.9K views
CC
The Most Prominent Citizens: Using County Histories
County histories bring rich possibilities to our research through biographical and historical sketches. They provide an abundance of FAN Club members and research clues. We will examine county histories through the use of a case study. Beginning with a research questions, we will examine the methodology of the FAN Club…
County histories bring rich possibilities to our research through biographical and historical sketches. They provide an abundance of FAN Club members and research clues. We will examine county histories through the use of a case study. Beginning with a research questions, we will examine the methodology of the FAN Club…
Wed, December 9 2020: 0:00 UTC
48:30
997 views
CC
How the Industrial Revolution Changed the World
This webinar serves to ‘set the scene’, detailing the effects of industrialisation on people and cities in England.
This webinar serves to ‘set the scene’, detailing the effects of industrialisation on people and cities in England.
Fri, September 13 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:04:05
A Recipe for Well-being: Health and Illness in Colonial New England
This talk will help genealogists place the role of health and medicine in their colonial ancestor’s life into perspective.
This talk will help genealogists place the role of health and medicine in their colonial ancestor’s life into perspective.
Fri, March 8 2019: 0:00 UTC
59:55
1.3K views
CC
Impact of the 1918 flu epidemic: A personal stories-based approach
The 1918 flu pandemic killed up to 100 million people worldwide in less than a year, disproportionately taking healthy young adults.
The 1918 flu pandemic killed up to 100 million people worldwide in less than a year, disproportionately taking healthy young adults.
Fri, March 8 2019: 0:00 UTC
50:25
581 views
CC
Soldier Health on the Western Front 1914-1918
The Western Front was the main theatre of war during World War One. A truly industrialised war with shrapnel, gas and bombs. Disease was also an issue with specific diseases due to the trench conditions.
The Western Front was the main theatre of war during World War One. A truly industrialised war with shrapnel, gas and bombs. Disease was also an issue with specific diseases due to the trench conditions.
Fri, November 9 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:04:56
Social History through the Ages: Sources for Social History from the Colonial Period to World War II
In this presentation we explore websites that provide the historical detail about our ancestor’s lives. These websites will help your research go from "just the facts" to a multi-dimensional reconstruction of your ancestor's life.
In this presentation we explore websites that provide the historical detail about our ancestor’s lives. These websites will help your research go from "just the facts" to a multi-dimensional reconstruction of your ancestor's life.
Fri, March 23 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:23:03
Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life
Social history is an important part of genealogical research. In this presentation we will go over 25 websites that will help you better understand your ancestor's life which will then lead you to more resources.
Social history is an important part of genealogical research. In this presentation we will go over 25 websites that will help you better understand your ancestor's life which will then lead you to more resources.
Wed, October 19 2016: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (106)
Thu, May 9 2024: 0:00 UTC
Finding the records for “impossible” genealogy – lessons learned from a Chinese genealogist
Thu, May 9 2024: 0:00 UTC
Even now, genealogy for underrepresented populations can be considered “impossible.” In this talk you’ll learn which populations are considered so, why that is, and techniques for expanding your genealogical skills. I use Chinese genealogy but the lessons are applicable for all underrepresented genealogical groups.
Even now, genealogy for underrepresented populations can be considered “impossible.” In this talk you’ll learn which populations are considered so, why that is, and techniques for expanding your genealogical skills. I use Chinese genealogy but the lessons are applicable for all underrepresented genealogical groups.
Thu, May 9 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 1
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Identity Crises: Right Name, Wrong Man? Wrong Name, Right Man?
Fri, May 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
What do we do with ancestors whose names don’t “match” from one record to the next? Or those who pose the opposite problem: too many men or women of the same name? This session examines a litany of social customs and naming patterns that cause ancestors to be known by different names—then offers techniques and strategies by which we can establish that any two records do or do not apply to the same person. A variety of case studies demonstrate the problems and the methods we can use to overcome them.
What do we do with ancestors whose names don’t “match” from one record to the next? Or those who pose the opposite problem: too many men or women of the same name? This session examines a litany of social customs and naming patterns that cause ancestors to be known by different names—then offers techniques and strategies by which we can establish that any two records do or do not apply to the same person. A variety of case studies demonstrate the problems and the methods we can use to overcome them.
Fri, May 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 2
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
How to Find the Truth about a Family Story
Fri, June 28 2024: 18:00 UTC
Oral history provides the foundation for all family research. Documentary evidence builds structure on that foundation. But documents often conflict with family traditions. How do we determine the core truths that are essential to understanding our own past? This class examines the causes of those conflicts and demonstrates how to peel away generations of confusion to find the real story that underpins family lore. Case studies include both Native American and African American traditions.
Oral history provides the foundation for all family research. Documentary evidence builds structure on that foundation. But documents often conflict with family traditions. How do we determine the core truths that are essential to understanding our own past? This class examines the causes of those conflicts and demonstrates how to peel away generations of confusion to find the real story that underpins family lore. Case studies include both Native American and African American traditions.
Fri, June 28 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral Genealogy in Asia-Pacific: The Essence of Personal Identity and Tribal Connections
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Finding Your Ancestors at the National SAR Genealogical Research Library
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has been collecting research material since its beginning in 1889. Not many people know that their national headquarters and award winning genealogical research library is located in Downtown Louisville Kentucky. Join us on a tour of the research facility and take a deep dive into the rare and expansive collection that awaits national researchers of all skill levels and timeline needs.
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has been collecting research material since its beginning in 1889. Not many people know that their national headquarters and award winning genealogical research library is located in Downtown Louisville Kentucky. Join us on a tour of the research facility and take a deep dive into the rare and expansive collection that awaits national researchers of all skill levels and timeline needs.
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Solving a 1770 problem with the 1880 census
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
He Had a Brother Who Disappeared: Finding John H. Hickey, Formerly of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC