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1:15:14
2.0K views
CC
The Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS): A Review
How do you know when you have genealogical proof? You apply the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) to your completed research. The GPS is how genealogists test conclusions–whether it is your research or other people’s research. Recognize why meeting the GPS is essential and when it is appropriate. Learn about the five interdependent components of the GPS. Understanding the GPS and being able to apply it will hone your research skills.
How do you know when you have genealogical proof? You apply the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) to your completed research. The GPS is how genealogists test conclusions–whether it is your research or other people’s research. Recognize why meeting the GPS is essential and when it is appropriate. Learn about the five interdependent components of the GPS. Understanding the GPS and being able to apply it will hone your research skills.
Wed, January 17 2024: 1:00 UTC
50:07
When Enough is Enough
When weaving DNA and paper trail evidence together, how do we know when enough is enough? There’s often a thin line between a convincing case and one that falls just short of meeting genealogical standards. When we look at specific cases, what guides us in determining when we have enough DNA or enough documentary evidence or enough of both-and when more will be needed to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard?
When weaving DNA and paper trail evidence together, how do we know when enough is enough? There’s often a thin line between a convincing case and one that falls just short of meeting genealogical standards. When we look at specific cases, what guides us in determining when we have enough DNA or enough documentary evidence or enough of both-and when more will be needed to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard?
Fri, April 14 2023: 13:00 UTC
1:18:37
8.5K views
CC
3 Ways to Advance Your Research with Correlation
Correlation is required to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS), but what exactly is it? How do I do it? And can it help me solve genealogical problems? We will use case studies to demonstrate how to correlate evidence to generate ideas for further research, test hypotheses, and present conclusions….
Correlation is required to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS), but what exactly is it? How do I do it? And can it help me solve genealogical problems? We will use case studies to demonstrate how to correlate evidence to generate ideas for further research, test hypotheses, and present conclusions….
Wed, April 21 2021: 18:00 UTC
46:31
4.7K views
CC
Can a Dead Man Sign a Deed?
When given conflicting evidence how do you resolve the issue at hand? This lecture will look at the five-point formula of the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) and how it helps resolve conflicting evidence with a fascinating case study.
When given conflicting evidence how do you resolve the issue at hand? This lecture will look at the five-point formula of the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) and how it helps resolve conflicting evidence with a fascinating case study.
Thu, March 12 2020: 0:00 UTC
Advanced
1:10:50
DNA and the GPS solves a mystery: Hamiltons in Colonial New England
Who was Capt Thomas Hamilton? Y-DNA solves a 300 year old mystery of his origins. Using the Genealogical Proof Standard as well as DNA evidence, Shellee describes solving a 300 year old mystery: Who was Captain Thomas Hamilton? This talk briefly describes the genealogical proof standard, the question relating to…
Who was Capt Thomas Hamilton? Y-DNA solves a 300 year old mystery of his origins. Using the Genealogical Proof Standard as well as DNA evidence, Shellee describes solving a 300 year old mystery: Who was Captain Thomas Hamilton? This talk briefly describes the genealogical proof standard, the question relating to…
Wed, February 6 2019: 0:00 UTC
Advanced
1:29:49
Patriot or Not? Using the Genealogical Proof Standard on a Closed DAR Line
The audience is introduced to the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) and then presented with four research questions concerning a man who is currently a patriot on a closed DAR line. The closed line needs more proof before descendants may claim his service. After going through the evidence, the audience will…
The audience is introduced to the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) and then presented with four research questions concerning a man who is currently a patriot on a closed DAR line. The closed line needs more proof before descendants may claim his service. After going through the evidence, the audience will…
Fri, January 25 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:10:24
3.2K views
CC
Proving Identity and Kinship Using the GPS: Finding a Freedman's Family
Facing identity and kinship problems? Confused by multiple, same-named men? Learn how applying the Genealogical Proof Standard resolved similar challenges in the search for a freedman's family. A case example traces a South Carolina family of color, differentiates multiple men of similar profiles who lived in the same time and…
Facing identity and kinship problems? Confused by multiple, same-named men? Learn how applying the Genealogical Proof Standard resolved similar challenges in the search for a freedman's family. A case example traces a South Carolina family of color, differentiates multiple men of similar profiles who lived in the same time and…
Tue, December 18 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:21:30
4.4K views
GPS: Finding Your Way Through Tough Research Problems
Life is good when records with direct evidence exist. Typically that doesn't last long. At some point, one finds only bits and pieces of indirect or conflicting evidence and progress often comes to a screeching halt. This class examines a case study prepared for application to the Board for Certification…
Life is good when records with direct evidence exist. Typically that doesn't last long. At some point, one finds only bits and pieces of indirect or conflicting evidence and progress often comes to a screeching halt. This class examines a case study prepared for application to the Board for Certification…
Tue, August 21 2018: 0:00 UTC
57:42
Logic and deduction: Part of the Genealogical Proof Standard
Correlation of facts, along with explaining conflicting evidence is part of the genealogical proof standard. Learn tools and see examples of how to do it. Correlation and analysis, as well as explaining inconsistencies in our research, are critical in the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Correlation of facts, along with explaining conflicting evidence is part of the genealogical proof standard. Learn tools and see examples of how to do it. Correlation and analysis, as well as explaining inconsistencies in our research, are critical in the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Fri, August 10 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:30:40
4.6K views
CC
Genealogical Proof for the Novice Genealogist
How do you know if the facts you've uncovered are correct? How do you avoid attaching somebody else's ancestors to your family tree? This introduction to the Genealogical Proof Standard will get your research moving in the right direction from the beginning and help you avoid errors and frustration.
How do you know if the facts you've uncovered are correct? How do you avoid attaching somebody else's ancestors to your family tree? This introduction to the Genealogical Proof Standard will get your research moving in the right direction from the beginning and help you avoid errors and frustration.
Wed, August 8 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:00:32
1.5K views
Which Record is Correct?
Resolving conflicting information from multiple documents With DearMYRTLE & Cousin Russ.
Resolving conflicting information from multiple documents With DearMYRTLE & Cousin Russ.
Fri, April 13 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:31:58
Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search
Through examples the problems with not conducting an exhaustive search will be highlighted. Assumptions, misinterpretations, and not digging deep enough into original records will all be showcased as to how they can mislead research, sometimes for years. Encouraging the audience to follow the principles of a reasonably exhaustive search should…
Through examples the problems with not conducting an exhaustive search will be highlighted. Assumptions, misinterpretations, and not digging deep enough into original records will all be showcased as to how they can mislead research, sometimes for years. Encouraging the audience to follow the principles of a reasonably exhaustive search should…
Wed, December 27 2017: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

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Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
French Emigrants: They Were Not All Huguenots, or Nobles, or from Alsace-Lorraine
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the 19th century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the 19th century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
Thu, May 9 2024: 0:00 UTC
Finding the records for “impossible” genealogy – lessons learned from a Chinese genealogist
Thu, May 9 2024: 0:00 UTC
Even now, genealogy for underrepresented populations can be considered “impossible.” In this talk you’ll learn which populations are considered so, why that is, and techniques for expanding your genealogical skills. I use Chinese genealogy but the lessons are applicable for all underrepresented genealogical groups.
Even now, genealogy for underrepresented populations can be considered “impossible.” In this talk you’ll learn which populations are considered so, why that is, and techniques for expanding your genealogical skills. I use Chinese genealogy but the lessons are applicable for all underrepresented genealogical groups.
Thu, May 9 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 1
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Identity Crises: Right Name, Wrong Man? Wrong Name, Right Man?
Fri, May 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
What do we do with ancestors whose names don’t “match” from one record to the next? Or those who pose the opposite problem: too many men or women of the same name? This session examines a litany of social customs and naming patterns that cause ancestors to be known by different names—then offers techniques and strategies by which we can establish that any two records do or do not apply to the same person. A variety of case studies demonstrate the problems and the methods we can use to overcome them.
What do we do with ancestors whose names don’t “match” from one record to the next? Or those who pose the opposite problem: too many men or women of the same name? This session examines a litany of social customs and naming patterns that cause ancestors to be known by different names—then offers techniques and strategies by which we can establish that any two records do or do not apply to the same person. A variety of case studies demonstrate the problems and the methods we can use to overcome them.
Fri, May 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 2
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
How to Find the Truth about a Family Story
Fri, June 28 2024: 18:00 UTC
Oral history provides the foundation for all family research. Documentary evidence builds structure on that foundation. But documents often conflict with family traditions. How do we determine the core truths that are essential to understanding our own past? This class examines the causes of those conflicts and demonstrates how to peel away generations of confusion to find the real story that underpins family lore. Case studies include both Native American and African American traditions.
Oral history provides the foundation for all family research. Documentary evidence builds structure on that foundation. But documents often conflict with family traditions. How do we determine the core truths that are essential to understanding our own past? This class examines the causes of those conflicts and demonstrates how to peel away generations of confusion to find the real story that underpins family lore. Case studies include both Native American and African American traditions.
Fri, June 28 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral Genealogy in Asia-Pacific: The Essence of Personal Identity and Tribal Connections
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Finding Your Ancestors at the National SAR Genealogical Research Library
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has been collecting research material since its beginning in 1889. Not many people know that their national headquarters and award winning genealogical research library is located in Downtown Louisville Kentucky. Join us on a tour of the research facility and take a deep dive into the rare and expansive collection that awaits national researchers of all skill levels and timeline needs.
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has been collecting research material since its beginning in 1889. Not many people know that their national headquarters and award winning genealogical research library is located in Downtown Louisville Kentucky. Join us on a tour of the research facility and take a deep dive into the rare and expansive collection that awaits national researchers of all skill levels and timeline needs.
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Solving a 1770 problem with the 1880 census
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC