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1:03:56
1.3K views
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Indirect Evidence – A Case Study
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:01:33
Investigate the Neighborhood to Advance Your Research (a 2021 Reisinger Lecture)
This lecture reveals the most powerful methodology available to genealogists. Family historians often begin their genealogical quest by researching only their direct ancestors. For many reasons the direct ancestor they search for may have left few records. The records that survive may not shed light on where the ancestor came…
This lecture reveals the most powerful methodology available to genealogists. Family historians often begin their genealogical quest by researching only their direct ancestors. For many reasons the direct ancestor they search for may have left few records. The records that survive may not shed light on where the ancestor came…
Fri, October 8 2021: 17:30 UTC
49:59
390 views
CC
One Family, Many Connections: Using the FAN club in one Australian locality
Family historians know only too well the importance of researching the family/friends, neighbours and associates (the FAN club) of direct line ancestors. Any information we find does not become truly valuable until placed into a community or cluster or network context. Harvesting the clues in the FAN club gives us the potential to further advance our research as well as provide pointers to other records or fragments. So, what genealogical details would be found if the FAN principle was applied to one family in a locality? This presentation will show how one such network or cluster evolved in the Hunter Valley region; one which was to be hugely influential in the growth years of the New South Wales colony and in the development of Australia as a nation.
Family historians know only too well the importance of researching the family/friends, neighbours and associates (the FAN club) of direct line ancestors. Any information we find does not become truly valuable until placed into a community or cluster or network context. Harvesting the clues in the FAN club gives us the potential to further advance our research as well as provide pointers to other records or fragments. So, what genealogical details would be found if the FAN principle was applied to one family in a locality? This presentation will show how one such network or cluster evolved in the Hunter Valley region; one which was to be hugely influential in the growth years of the New South Wales colony and in the development of Australia as a nation.
Fri, September 24 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:24:50
1.8K views
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Cluster Research: Using Groups of People to Find Your People
Our ancestors did not live in a vacuum. They lived, worked, socialized, and married in the midst of a larger group of people. Those people included not just family members but friends, neighbors, employers and fellow employees, fellow churchgoers, and business associates. Genealogists often refers to this group with the…
Our ancestors did not live in a vacuum. They lived, worked, socialized, and married in the midst of a larger group of people. Those people included not just family members but friends, neighbors, employers and fellow employees, fellow churchgoers, and business associates. Genealogists often refers to this group with the…
Thu, September 23 2021: 0:00 UTC
32:32
2.1K views
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FAN Club in Action: a Simple Case Study
Sometimes the answers we seek will not be in the records of our ancestor. Turning to the records of their FAN Club – their Friends/Family, Associates and Neighbors – may have what we are looking for. Join Geoff Rasmussen as he walks you through a simple case study of using the FAN Club methods.
Sometimes the answers we seek will not be in the records of our ancestor. Turning to the records of their FAN Club – their Friends/Family, Associates and Neighbors – may have what we are looking for. Join Geoff Rasmussen as he walks you through a simple case study of using the FAN Club methods.
Fri, September 3 2021: 12:00 UTC
1:02:05
547 views
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Finding Jane Graham’s Parents: Using Clusters and Records in Three Countries
Tracking the woman who raised Jane’s youngest child leads from California through England to County Tyrone to identify parents. An Irish family case study. Brief Outline Jane Graham was born in Ireland in 1835. Unsourced family lore provided parents’ names. Twenty years of on-and-off research proved the lore was true. Jane and her husband and children were missed in the 1860 census. Her only census appearance was 1870, three years before her death in childbirth. Encountering Jane’s last child another family’s household led to extensive research on Ann Lockren and the discovery that Ann and Jane were sisters. Research on Irish-born Ann led to records of her marriage and children in County Durham, England. After Ann was widowed, she lived in the same household as another Graham family. Tracking those Grahams through clues in family trees to records in England and Ireland led to origins in County Tyrone. Catholic parish registers in Tyrone proved Jane and Ann were sisters, and who their parents were. Case involves multiple surname variants and use of cluster research.
Tracking the woman who raised Jane’s youngest child leads from California through England to County Tyrone to identify parents. An Irish family case study. Brief Outline Jane Graham was born in Ireland in 1835. Unsourced family lore provided parents’ names. Twenty years of on-and-off research proved the lore was true. Jane and her husband and children were missed in the 1860 census. Her only census appearance was 1870, three years before her death in childbirth. Encountering Jane’s last child another family’s household led to extensive research on Ann Lockren and the discovery that Ann and Jane were sisters. Research on Irish-born Ann led to records of her marriage and children in County Durham, England. After Ann was widowed, she lived in the same household as another Graham family. Tracking those Grahams through clues in family trees to records in England and Ireland led to origins in County Tyrone. Catholic parish registers in Tyrone proved Jane and Ann were sisters, and who their parents were. Case involves multiple surname variants and use of cluster research.
Fri, September 3 2021: 7:00 UTC
1:25:27
2.6K views
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The Art of Negative-Space Research: Women
Like using negative space in art, the successful identification of women is often accomplished by using the records of friends and family.
Like using negative space in art, the successful identification of women is often accomplished by using the records of friends and family.
Wed, July 11 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:21:58
3.5K views
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What Your Ancestor's Neighbors Can Tell You
Our ancestors did not live in isolation, although we sometimes research them as if they did. They were part of a community of friends, neighbors, and even co-workers. Whether they lived in big cities, small towns or rural farming communities, your ancestor's neighbors could help you with your research. Using…
Our ancestors did not live in isolation, although we sometimes research them as if they did. They were part of a community of friends, neighbors, and even co-workers. Whether they lived in big cities, small towns or rural farming communities, your ancestor's neighbors could help you with your research. Using…
Wed, June 6 2018: 0:00 UTC
45:33
Clusters and Chains for Genealogical Success
Track neighbors and associates to find European hometowns. This lecture describes cluster genealogy and chain migration and demonstrates proven methods to find your ancestors’ origins.
Track neighbors and associates to find European hometowns. This lecture describes cluster genealogy and chain migration and demonstrates proven methods to find your ancestors’ origins.
Fri, December 1 2017: 0:00 UTC
Advanced
56:50
FAN + GPS + DNA: The Problem-Solver's Great Trifecta
Can you really 'prove' a female line when, for four straight generations, absolutely no document identifies a parent or sibling? Does the challenge seem hopeless when courthouses are burned and an illegitimacy is rumored? This session will demonstrate how to use three critical tools: (1) the FAN Principle to build…
Can you really 'prove' a female line when, for four straight generations, absolutely no document identifies a parent or sibling? Does the challenge seem hopeless when courthouses are burned and an illegitimacy is rumored? This session will demonstrate how to use three critical tools: (1) the FAN Principle to build…
Fri, October 7 2016: 0:00 UTC
1:30:35
How Do I Know That's My Ancestor?
People with the same name. Nicknames. Changing names. How do you know if the record you're looking at is referring to your ancestor? Learn how to examine information so you can tell if it's your ancestor and not just someone with the same name.
People with the same name. Nicknames. Changing names. How do you know if the record you're looking at is referring to your ancestor? Learn how to examine information so you can tell if it's your ancestor and not just someone with the same name.
Wed, March 9 2016: 0:00 UTC
1:50:19
5.5K views
Problem Solving with FANs
Often the answer to climbing a genealogy brick wall is simply to go around it. By broadening our research to include our ancestor's friends, associates and neighbors, we can find answers that were previously elusive. Further, we paint a much broader, richer story of the ancestor's life by including their…
Often the answer to climbing a genealogy brick wall is simply to go around it. By broadening our research to include our ancestor's friends, associates and neighbors, we can find answers that were previously elusive. Further, we paint a much broader, richer story of the ancestor's life by including their…
Fri, February 19 2016: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (40)
Fri, September 30 2022: 16:45 UTC
Indirect Evidence, A Case Study: The Parents of Elizabeth Wingate in Maryland (1795–1860)
Fri, September 30 2022: 16:45 UTC
We all have lost Elizabeths in our tree. This lecture will discuss how the understanding and application of indirect evidence is such a valuable instrument in your methodology tool-kit. This case study will examine methods and sources that contributed to finding the parents of Elizabeth Wingate (1795-1860) of Baltimore, Maryland.
We all have lost Elizabeths in our tree. This lecture will discuss how the understanding and application of indirect evidence is such a valuable instrument in your methodology tool-kit. This case study will examine methods and sources that contributed to finding the parents of Elizabeth Wingate (1795-1860) of Baltimore, Maryland.
Fri, September 30 2022: 16:45 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:30 UTC
When Wrong is Actually Right: Constructing Proof Arguments for Counterintuitive Conflicts (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:30 UTC
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:30 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:45 UTC
Peeling the Onion: Getting to the Original Sources (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:45 UTC
Genealogy Standards 38 and 58 strongly express a preference for using original sources. Diligent researching and a few tricks of the trade enable genealogists to find original sources that underlie authored narratives and derivative sources.
Genealogy Standards 38 and 58 strongly express a preference for using original sources. Diligent researching and a few tricks of the trade enable genealogists to find original sources that underlie authored narratives and derivative sources.
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:45 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 18:00 UTC
The Hub of the Wheel: How Tracing a Brother with no Children Connected Ten Siblings (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 18:00 UTC
A family from Ireland emigrated in a chain migration scheme to western Pennsylvania between 1825 and 1845. See how using the standards for researching connected the siblings and their descendants and led to their origins in County Tyrone.
A family from Ireland emigrated in a chain migration scheme to western Pennsylvania between 1825 and 1845. See how using the standards for researching connected the siblings and their descendants and led to their origins in County Tyrone.
Fri, October 7 2022: 18:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:00 UTC
Consult via…Explore with…Discover through…Literature Reviews (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:00 UTC
What if you could consult with genealogical experts each time your work slows? Together you could explore options for new paths of discovery. The right approach to a literature review allows you to do that. Other experts have encountered the same challenges that you do, and they have written about them even if not overtly. These challenges could range from beginning work in a new geography to parrying with a difficult brick wall. Learn how to conduct a targeted literature review, cull the information you need, and advance your research. A case study on use of negative evidence will highlight the methodology.
What if you could consult with genealogical experts each time your work slows? Together you could explore options for new paths of discovery. The right approach to a literature review allows you to do that. Other experts have encountered the same challenges that you do, and they have written about them even if not overtly. These challenges could range from beginning work in a new geography to parrying with a difficult brick wall. Learn how to conduct a targeted literature review, cull the information you need, and advance your research. A case study on use of negative evidence will highlight the methodology.
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 21:15 UTC
Finding Henrietta: Reconciling Conflicting Evidence to Reveal a Woman’s Identity (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 21:15 UTC
Henrietta Dixon was never enumerated with individuals identified as her parents in a federal census. Records revealing her family members, including her father, are often conflicting and open up new questions. Additionally, multiple marriages further obscure her identity. This case study uncovers Henrietta’s maiden name and emphasizes the importance of a focused research question when attempting to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Henrietta Dixon was never enumerated with individuals identified as her parents in a federal census. Records revealing her family members, including her father, are often conflicting and open up new questions. Additionally, multiple marriages further obscure her identity. This case study uncovers Henrietta’s maiden name and emphasizes the importance of a focused research question when attempting to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Fri, October 7 2022: 21:15 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:30 UTC
Hidden Stories: Using Analysis to Explore the Unexpected in Family History (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:30 UTC
Tales of illegitimacy, divorce, and desertion aren’t limited to soap operas and modern reality television. Discovering trails that lead to unanticipated events can be shocking, confusing, and exciting all at the same time. This session will explore how genealogists can utilize the law, conflict resolution, and tools like date calculators and timelines to help build a clearer understanding of some potentially challenging historical situations.
Tales of illegitimacy, divorce, and desertion aren’t limited to soap operas and modern reality television. Discovering trails that lead to unanticipated events can be shocking, confusing, and exciting all at the same time. This session will explore how genealogists can utilize the law, conflict resolution, and tools like date calculators and timelines to help build a clearer understanding of some potentially challenging historical situations.
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:30 UTC
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Misled by Records: Identifying Adam Cosner’s Parentage
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Pennsylvania and Ohio records, correlated with those of a German immigrant who died in Virginia revealed Adam Cosner’s parents.
Pennsylvania and Ohio records, correlated with those of a German immigrant who died in Virginia revealed Adam Cosner’s parents.
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Thu, November 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Finding Females in US Naturalization Records, 1790-1945
Thu, November 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Whether you’re missing a naturalization record or finding an unexpected one, this session helps you discover how female ancestors – both foreign-born and birthright – gained, lost, or regained citizenship in the United States between 1790 and 1945. US citizenship and attendant rights for women could be fragile, depending on marital status, prevailing laws, social norms, and other shifting factors. Examples of US naturalization and citizenship records, and search strategies for finding these records are featured in this presentation.
Whether you’re missing a naturalization record or finding an unexpected one, this session helps you discover how female ancestors – both foreign-born and birthright – gained, lost, or regained citizenship in the United States between 1790 and 1945. US citizenship and attendant rights for women could be fragile, depending on marital status, prevailing laws, social norms, and other shifting factors. Examples of US naturalization and citizenship records, and search strategies for finding these records are featured in this presentation.
Thu, November 10 2022: 1:00 UTC