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1:09:11
1.6K views
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Why We Should Look at In-Laws When Doing Genealogical Research
Often, when the records of family members can’t be easily found, a review of fictive kin and other connections might bring those missing individuals into view. Let’s look at some cases when broadening our focus might bring the target directly into our view.
Often, when the records of family members can’t be easily found, a review of fictive kin and other connections might bring those missing individuals into view. Let’s look at some cases when broadening our focus might bring the target directly into our view.
Wed, July 26 2023: 18:00 UTC
Advanced
1:16:38
Okay, I ‘Got the Neighbors’—Now What Do I Do with Them?!
We’ve all heard the mantra Get the Neighbors! But exactly how do we use “other people’s” information to solve problems of identity, kinship, and origin for our own ancestors? This session teaches critical skills for building networks around problem ancestors, methods for analyzing and prioritizing associations, and strategies for milking clues from the records those neighbors created. All can be developed into solutions for our toughest research problems.
We’ve all heard the mantra Get the Neighbors! But exactly how do we use “other people’s” information to solve problems of identity, kinship, and origin for our own ancestors? This session teaches critical skills for building networks around problem ancestors, methods for analyzing and prioritizing associations, and strategies for milking clues from the records those neighbors created. All can be developed into solutions for our toughest research problems.
Fri, April 28 2023: 18:00 UTC
48:40
1.2K views
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The FAN Club Methodology, DNA, and Genealogy Lead Back to Lunatic’s Plantation
Utilizing the FAN Club method, DNA, and enslaved ancestral research, Collier finally found major clues to help solve a longtime mystery – who was the previous enslaver of his great-great grandmother, Polly Partee of Panola County, Mississippi, and where did she come from? Her last enslaver was Squire Boone Partee of Panola County, and Polly had been the head cook on his plantation during and after slavery, according to oral history. According to the censuses, she was born somewhere in North Carolina and sold to Squire by 1852, but her origins had been largely unknown. Collier will present a plethora of DNA evidence, in conjunction with genealogy research and the FAN Club methodology, to uncover Polly’s North Carolina origins. Collier will also argue how a court-investigated lunatic, Alfred Alston of Fayette County, Tennessee, was most likely her previous enslaver.
Utilizing the FAN Club method, DNA, and enslaved ancestral research, Collier finally found major clues to help solve a longtime mystery – who was the previous enslaver of his great-great grandmother, Polly Partee of Panola County, Mississippi, and where did she come from? Her last enslaver was Squire Boone Partee of Panola County, and Polly had been the head cook on his plantation during and after slavery, according to oral history. According to the censuses, she was born somewhere in North Carolina and sold to Squire by 1852, but her origins had been largely unknown. Collier will present a plethora of DNA evidence, in conjunction with genealogy research and the FAN Club methodology, to uncover Polly’s North Carolina origins. Collier will also argue how a court-investigated lunatic, Alfred Alston of Fayette County, Tennessee, was most likely her previous enslaver.
Fri, April 14 2023: 1:00 UTC
1:24:42
1.6K views
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Uncovering Immigrant Origins Through Cluster Research
Descendants of an early Ohio family had no idea of their origins. Following an associated family brought success, even after wading into foreign- language documents. This presentation shows what to do when traditional records fail to reveal an ancestor’s place of origin and how to use cluster research to break through the brick wall. Discussion will include how to determine the place of origin using records found in the United States and what to do when no records exist on your direct line.
Descendants of an early Ohio family had no idea of their origins. Following an associated family brought success, even after wading into foreign- language documents. This presentation shows what to do when traditional records fail to reveal an ancestor’s place of origin and how to use cluster research to break through the brick wall. Discussion will include how to determine the place of origin using records found in the United States and what to do when no records exist on your direct line.
Wed, March 22 2023: 0:00 UTC
Advanced
1:21:34
Trousers, Black Domestic, Tacks & Housekeeping Bills: Problem-Solving with “Trivial Details”
The records we use are filled with “trivia,” bits and pieces of information that seem to have no “genealogical” value—at least not until we become more innovative in our research and analysis. Each piece of trivia in every document is an opportunity waiting to be connected to something else. Our ability to resolve problems depends upon our ability to make those connections. This class explores eighteen types of records and the kind of hidden clues each offers to help us resolve problems of identity, kinship, and origin. *** This class requires an active webinar membership to attend. ***
The records we use are filled with “trivia,” bits and pieces of information that seem to have no “genealogical” value—at least not until we become more innovative in our research and analysis. Each piece of trivia in every document is an opportunity waiting to be connected to something else. Our ability to resolve problems depends upon our ability to make those connections. This class explores eighteen types of records and the kind of hidden clues each offers to help us resolve problems of identity, kinship, and origin. *** This class requires an active webinar membership to attend. ***
Fri, January 27 2023: 19:00 UTC
50:04
641 views
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Consult via…Explore with…Discover through…Literature Reviews (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
What if you could consult with genealogical experts each time your work slows? Together you could explore options for new paths of discovery. The right approach to a literature review allows you to do that. Other experts have encountered the same challenges that you do, and they have written about them even if not overtly. These challenges could range from beginning work in a new geography to parrying with a difficult brick wall. Learn how to conduct a targeted literature review, cull the information you need, and advance your research. A case study on the use of the FAN Club will highlight the methodology.
What if you could consult with genealogical experts each time your work slows? Together you could explore options for new paths of discovery. The right approach to a literature review allows you to do that. Other experts have encountered the same challenges that you do, and they have written about them even if not overtly. These challenges could range from beginning work in a new geography to parrying with a difficult brick wall. Learn how to conduct a targeted literature review, cull the information you need, and advance your research. A case study on the use of the FAN Club will highlight the methodology.
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:00 UTC
1:03:56
1.3K views
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Indirect Evidence – A Case Study
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:01:33
Investigate the Neighborhood to Advance Your Research (a 2021 Reisinger Lecture)
This lecture reveals the most powerful methodology available to genealogists. Family historians often begin their genealogical quest by researching only their direct ancestors. For many reasons the direct ancestor they search for may have left few records. The records that survive may not shed light on where the ancestor came…
This lecture reveals the most powerful methodology available to genealogists. Family historians often begin their genealogical quest by researching only their direct ancestors. For many reasons the direct ancestor they search for may have left few records. The records that survive may not shed light on where the ancestor came…
Fri, October 8 2021: 17:30 UTC
49:59
421 views
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One Family, Many Connections: Using the FAN club in one Australian locality
Family historians know only too well the importance of researching the family/friends, neighbours and associates (the FAN club) of direct line ancestors. Any information we find does not become truly valuable until placed into a community or cluster or network context. Harvesting the clues in the FAN club gives us the potential to further advance our research as well as provide pointers to other records or fragments. So, what genealogical details would be found if the FAN principle was applied to one family in a locality? This presentation will show how one such network or cluster evolved in the Hunter Valley region; one which was to be hugely influential in the growth years of the New South Wales colony and in the development of Australia as a nation.
Family historians know only too well the importance of researching the family/friends, neighbours and associates (the FAN club) of direct line ancestors. Any information we find does not become truly valuable until placed into a community or cluster or network context. Harvesting the clues in the FAN club gives us the potential to further advance our research as well as provide pointers to other records or fragments. So, what genealogical details would be found if the FAN principle was applied to one family in a locality? This presentation will show how one such network or cluster evolved in the Hunter Valley region; one which was to be hugely influential in the growth years of the New South Wales colony and in the development of Australia as a nation.
Fri, September 24 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:24:50
2.0K views
CC
Cluster Research: Using Groups of People to Find Your People
Our ancestors did not live in a vacuum. They lived, worked, socialized, and married in the midst of a larger group of people. Those people included not just family members but friends, neighbors, employers and fellow employees, fellow churchgoers, and business associates. Genealogists often refers to this group with the…
Our ancestors did not live in a vacuum. They lived, worked, socialized, and married in the midst of a larger group of people. Those people included not just family members but friends, neighbors, employers and fellow employees, fellow churchgoers, and business associates. Genealogists often refers to this group with the…
Thu, September 23 2021: 0:00 UTC
32:32
2.2K views
CC
FAN Club in Action: a Simple Case Study
Sometimes the answers we seek will not be in the records of our ancestor. Turning to the records of their FAN Club – their Friends/Family, Associates and Neighbors – may have what we are looking for. Join Geoff Rasmussen as he walks you through a simple case study of using the FAN Club methods.
Sometimes the answers we seek will not be in the records of our ancestor. Turning to the records of their FAN Club – their Friends/Family, Associates and Neighbors – may have what we are looking for. Join Geoff Rasmussen as he walks you through a simple case study of using the FAN Club methods.
Fri, September 3 2021: 12:00 UTC
1:02:05
604 views
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Finding Jane Graham’s Parents: Using Clusters and Records in Three Countries
Tracking the woman who raised Jane’s youngest child leads from California through England to County Tyrone to identify parents. An Irish family case study. Brief Outline Jane Graham was born in Ireland in 1835. Unsourced family lore provided parents’ names. Twenty years of on-and-off research proved the lore was true. Jane and her husband and children were missed in the 1860 census. Her only census appearance was 1870, three years before her death in childbirth. Encountering Jane’s last child another family’s household led to extensive research on Ann Lockren and the discovery that Ann and Jane were sisters. Research on Irish-born Ann led to records of her marriage and children in County Durham, England. After Ann was widowed, she lived in the same household as another Graham family. Tracking those Grahams through clues in family trees to records in England and Ireland led to origins in County Tyrone. Catholic parish registers in Tyrone proved Jane and Ann were sisters, and who their parents were. Case involves multiple surname variants and use of cluster research.
Tracking the woman who raised Jane’s youngest child leads from California through England to County Tyrone to identify parents. An Irish family case study. Brief Outline Jane Graham was born in Ireland in 1835. Unsourced family lore provided parents’ names. Twenty years of on-and-off research proved the lore was true. Jane and her husband and children were missed in the 1860 census. Her only census appearance was 1870, three years before her death in childbirth. Encountering Jane’s last child another family’s household led to extensive research on Ann Lockren and the discovery that Ann and Jane were sisters. Research on Irish-born Ann led to records of her marriage and children in County Durham, England. After Ann was widowed, she lived in the same household as another Graham family. Tracking those Grahams through clues in family trees to records in England and Ireland led to origins in County Tyrone. Catholic parish registers in Tyrone proved Jane and Ann were sisters, and who their parents were. Case involves multiple surname variants and use of cluster research.
Fri, September 3 2021: 7:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (78)
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Solving a 1770 problem with the 1880 census
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
He Had a Brother Who Disappeared: Finding John H. Hickey, Formerly of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
Prepping for and Researching at the FamilySearch Library
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
The FamilySearch Library is the premier destination for genealogists. Researchers from around the world flock to Salt Lake City to discover and connect with their ancestors in the world’s largest genealogy library. The FamilySearch Library boasts more than 600,000 books, tens of thousands of historical maps and published pedigrees, and hundreds of workstations where visitors can access dozens of subscription sites. The best kept secret of the library is its incredible mix of volunteer and paid staff that have been specifically trained to help you in your research and how to help you take full advantage of the library’s resources. Whether you are a novice or a professional there is something for everyone at the FamilySearch Library.
The FamilySearch Library is the premier destination for genealogists. Researchers from around the world flock to Salt Lake City to discover and connect with their ancestors in the world’s largest genealogy library. The FamilySearch Library boasts more than 600,000 books, tens of thousands of historical maps and published pedigrees, and hundreds of workstations where visitors can access dozens of subscription sites. The best kept secret of the library is its incredible mix of volunteer and paid staff that have been specifically trained to help you in your research and how to help you take full advantage of the library’s resources. Whether you are a novice or a professional there is something for everyone at the FamilySearch Library.
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, September 6 2024: 15:30 UTC
Elizabeth Matson – the wife of Timothy Mather born 1711 or Timothy Mather born 1747?
Fri, September 6 2024: 15:30 UTC
Which Timothy Mather married Elizabeth Matson? An argument has long been made – based on a faulty entry in a Connecticut vital record book. Discovering the real answer requires taking a deep dive into Connecticut records, reviewing land, probate, militia commissions and more.
Which Timothy Mather married Elizabeth Matson? An argument has long been made – based on a faulty entry in a Connecticut vital record book. Discovering the real answer requires taking a deep dive into Connecticut records, reviewing land, probate, militia commissions and more.
Fri, September 6 2024: 15:30 UTC
Fri, September 6 2024: 19:30 UTC
Bridging Generations: Connecting with Living Relatives Through MyHeritage
Fri, September 6 2024: 19:30 UTC
Connecting with living relatives can unveil a treasure trove of family history beyond the confines of documents and records. Are you making the most of these living links to your past? Join Lisa Lisson for an exploration of MyHeritage’s potent tools, designed to help you build bridges with relatives and unearth precious family memories. From initiating heartfelt conversations to orchestrating virtual family reunions, this session arms you with a toolkit to cherish and deepen intergenerational connections. Walk away with a newfound ability to weave your family’s living stories into your historical tapestry.
Connecting with living relatives can unveil a treasure trove of family history beyond the confines of documents and records. Are you making the most of these living links to your past? Join Lisa Lisson for an exploration of MyHeritage’s potent tools, designed to help you build bridges with relatives and unearth precious family memories. From initiating heartfelt conversations to orchestrating virtual family reunions, this session arms you with a toolkit to cherish and deepen intergenerational connections. Walk away with a newfound ability to weave your family’s living stories into your historical tapestry.
Fri, September 6 2024: 19:30 UTC
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Luff In The Devon Cottages: Exploring A One-Place Study by Kirsty Gray
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Our ancestors were people, just like us. They were born, they lived, they died, they laughed, they cried, and they fell in love – or should that be luff…? Join people-finding wizard and genealogist Kirsty Gray on a journey through her one place study about the small Devon parishes of Luffincott and Tetcott; learn about the history of these villages, their inhabitants and their challenges, as Kirsty talks you through the trials and triumphs of conducting a one place study. This exploration of the past of a remote and rural part of Devon is sure to providing a fascinating window into the past and be a great example of the benefits conducting a one place study can bring.
Our ancestors were people, just like us. They were born, they lived, they died, they laughed, they cried, and they fell in love – or should that be luff…? Join people-finding wizard and genealogist Kirsty Gray on a journey through her one place study about the small Devon parishes of Luffincott and Tetcott; learn about the history of these villages, their inhabitants and their challenges, as Kirsty talks you through the trials and triumphs of conducting a one place study. This exploration of the past of a remote and rural part of Devon is sure to providing a fascinating window into the past and be a great example of the benefits conducting a one place study can bring.
Fri, September 13 2024: 14:15 UTC
Fri, September 13 2024: 15:30 UTC
The Neighbors Knew: Strategies for Finding YOUR Ancestral Details in THEIR Records
Fri, September 13 2024: 15:30 UTC
A christening attended, best friend’s wedding, or the same church. Examples from the written words of other people provide details on YOUR family. Marriages, births, deaths, similar jobs, military service, memberships, education, employees, and more on YOUR family. Includes ways to find these other words along with many examples filled with names of other people.
A christening attended, best friend’s wedding, or the same church. Examples from the written words of other people provide details on YOUR family. Marriages, births, deaths, similar jobs, military service, memberships, education, employees, and more on YOUR family. Includes ways to find these other words along with many examples filled with names of other people.
Fri, September 13 2024: 15:30 UTC
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
A Myriad of Slave Databases
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
In the summer of 2023 American Ancestors/New England Historic Genealogical Society announced the collaborative 10 Million Names project, an undertaking to recover the names of people of African descent who were enslaved in the area of the United States. This monumental task of centralizing datasets about African Americans is likely to take years to accomplish; in the interim, this webinar provides a useful survey of the many existing databases that serve a similar purpose though limited in scope.
In the summer of 2023 American Ancestors/New England Historic Genealogical Society announced the collaborative 10 Million Names project, an undertaking to recover the names of people of African descent who were enslaved in the area of the United States. This monumental task of centralizing datasets about African Americans is likely to take years to accomplish; in the interim, this webinar provides a useful survey of the many existing databases that serve a similar purpose though limited in scope.
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
Fri, September 27 2024: 14:15 UTC
Church Records in Archives
Fri, September 27 2024: 14:15 UTC
Church record research is a must for any genealogist. Many of our archives have church records available to researchers. There are also independent church archives for specific religions or denominations that can help you discover your ancestor. Learn from a seasoned genealogist and archivist how to find church records in archives.
Church record research is a must for any genealogist. Many of our archives have church records available to researchers. There are also independent church archives for specific religions or denominations that can help you discover your ancestor. Learn from a seasoned genealogist and archivist how to find church records in archives.
Fri, September 27 2024: 14:15 UTC