Featured Webinars

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56:25
37 views
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Getting the best out of the online Local BMD indexes
This webinar was presented live during the 2022 Surname Society annual conference. Ian Hartas talk will cover some of the basic techniques in how to get the best out of local BMD sites and also cover a basic walk through on them to suit newcomers.
This webinar was presented live during the 2022 Surname Society annual conference. Ian Hartas talk will cover some of the basic techniques in how to get the best out of local BMD sites and also cover a basic walk through on them to suit newcomers.
Sat, March 19 2022: 17:00 UTC
56:19
189 views
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Getting the Most out of the Irish Census
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
Sat, November 27 2021: 0:00 UTC
43:39
122 views
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My Ancestors Survived the Johnstown Flood! How to Research Your Ancestors’ Amazing Stories
A heroic rescue, a love story and a 30-foot wall of water. That’s just part of my ancestors’ experience in the Great Johnstown Flood of 1889. Come learn how to reconstruct fascinating experiences from your own family history by combining clues from your family’s knowledge, documents from genealogy websites, good historical research and Googling to fill in the gaps. All while learning the riveting story of one of the worst disasters in U.S. history.
A heroic rescue, a love story and a 30-foot wall of water. That’s just part of my ancestors’ experience in the Great Johnstown Flood of 1889. Come learn how to reconstruct fascinating experiences from your own family history by combining clues from your family’s knowledge, documents from genealogy websites, good historical research and Googling to fill in the gaps. All while learning the riveting story of one of the worst disasters in U.S. history.
Sat, November 27 2021: 0:00 UTC
47:54
469 views
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Finding the Elusive Maiden Name
Searching for the maiden name of our ancestress can be frustrating. This webinar presents a hierarchy of search strategies for tracing the maiden name. Begin by trying to locate a marriage record, keeping in mind the record will vary by time period and geographic location. If a marriage record search proves fruitless, a second tier of sources is recommended including children’s death records, the women’s death record, census and other sources. Finally, the webinar presents strategies specific to the maiden name search such as following the husband and learning about history where the couple lived.
Ann Lawthers
Searching for the maiden name of our ancestress can be frustrating. This webinar presents a hierarchy of search strategies for tracing the maiden name. Begin by trying to locate a marriage record, keeping in mind the record will vary by time period and geographic location. If a marriage record search proves fruitless, a second tier of sources is recommended including children’s death records, the women’s death record, census and other sources. Finally, the webinar presents strategies specific to the maiden name search such as following the husband and learning about history where the couple lived.
Sat, November 27 2021: 0:00 UTC
45:19
24 views
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I want my mummy: Researching Egyptian family history
When we think of Egyptians, most of us would conjure up images of Tutankamun and Cleopatra. The nine year old boy king Tutankamun, who died as a teenager, ruled from 1333 to 1323 BC. The discovery of his largely intact tomb in 1922 is considered one of the most significant archaeological discoveries in the modern era, and the contents of his tomb are more significant than his short reign. Queen Cleopatra, born 69BC, who ruled Egypt from 51 to 30 BC, was the last ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty. She is famous for her beauty and her love triangle with the Roman warlords Julius Caesar and Mark Antony (not her twenty year reign). ‘Cleopatra,’ played by the white, blue eyed, black haired Elizabeth Taylor, (not an African woman) is a 1963 five hour film, depicting Cleopatra\’s relationships with Caesar and Antony in an ill-fated attempt to save the Egyptian empire. However, this images are from ancient Egypt. Many children will have dressed up for the day in a bedsheet and a hair towel, when looking at Egypt in school. For many people, the first time they will see a dead body is when they visit a museum and see an Egyptian Mummy. However, these aren’t ‘mummies’ – they are people, whose bodies underwent a mummification process. And is it ok that these bodies have been removed from their burial places and unceremoniously placed in glass cabinets and exposed for all to see, very distant from their countries? So how do Egyptians today mark births, marriages and deaths? This session will look at how Egyptian people today register births, celebrate marriages and register and bury their dead. The roles of religion and bureaucracy will be explained. What are the traditional naming systems in place? Do women change their surname when they marry? Examples of Egyptian family trees will be given, which reveal that women aren’t placed on family trees. What do DNA testing companies reveal about Egyptian DNA?
When we think of Egyptians, most of us would conjure up images of Tutankamun and Cleopatra. The nine year old boy king Tutankamun, who died as a teenager, ruled from 1333 to 1323 BC. The discovery of his largely intact tomb in 1922 is considered one of the most significant archaeological discoveries in the modern era, and the contents of his tomb are more significant than his short reign. Queen Cleopatra, born 69BC, who ruled Egypt from 51 to 30 BC, was the last ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty. She is famous for her beauty and her love triangle with the Roman warlords Julius Caesar and Mark Antony (not her twenty year reign). ‘Cleopatra,’ played by the white, blue eyed, black haired Elizabeth Taylor, (not an African woman) is a 1963 five hour film, depicting Cleopatra\’s relationships with Caesar and Antony in an ill-fated attempt to save the Egyptian empire. However, this images are from ancient Egypt. Many children will have dressed up for the day in a bedsheet and a hair towel, when looking at Egypt in school. For many people, the first time they will see a dead body is when they visit a museum and see an Egyptian Mummy. However, these aren’t ‘mummies’ – they are people, whose bodies underwent a mummification process. And is it ok that these bodies have been removed from their burial places and unceremoniously placed in glass cabinets and exposed for all to see, very distant from their countries? So how do Egyptians today mark births, marriages and deaths? This session will look at how Egyptian people today register births, celebrate marriages and register and bury their dead. The roles of religion and bureaucracy will be explained. What are the traditional naming systems in place? Do women change their surname when they marry? Examples of Egyptian family trees will be given, which reveal that women aren’t placed on family trees. What do DNA testing companies reveal about Egyptian DNA?
Fri, November 26 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:08:37
119 views
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Preserving Your Ancestor’s Textiles and Handmade Treasures
Learn from an archivist the best practices to preserving your ancestor’s textiles and handmade items. Everything from Grandma’s quilt, that old Christening gown, your Dad’s letterman jacket and military uniforms. These textiles and handmade items need special care and consideration when it comes to preservation and storage.
Learn from an archivist the best practices to preserving your ancestor’s textiles and handmade items. Everything from Grandma’s quilt, that old Christening gown, your Dad’s letterman jacket and military uniforms. These textiles and handmade items need special care and consideration when it comes to preservation and storage.
Fri, October 29 2021: 0:00 UTC
55:09
Moravian Trails and Records
The Moravians in the 1700s not only settled Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, but their mission work took them to other areas to work with Native Americans. Moravian records include Community Diaries which were required to be kept by each settlement. They were a way for them to record not only ecclesiastical events but other events that affected their settlement such as their interactions with native populations and slaves as they went about doing their missionary work. The German heritage of the Moravians shows in the details of naming visitors (along with any aliases) and relationships among the individuals mentioned. The Moravian records are truly a treasure-trove for anyone whose ancestors were in the same vicinity or time.
The Moravians in the 1700s not only settled Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, but their mission work took them to other areas to work with Native Americans. Moravian records include Community Diaries which were required to be kept by each settlement. They were a way for them to record not only ecclesiastical events but other events that affected their settlement such as their interactions with native populations and slaves as they went about doing their missionary work. The German heritage of the Moravians shows in the details of naming visitors (along with any aliases) and relationships among the individuals mentioned. The Moravian records are truly a treasure-trove for anyone whose ancestors were in the same vicinity or time.
Fri, September 24 2021: 0:00 UTC
8:25
1.2K views
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3 Ways to Use DNA Painter's cM Estimator Tool
Learn practical ways to use the centiMorgan Estimator Tool at DNA Painter to solve your DNA questions.
Learn practical ways to use the centiMorgan Estimator Tool at DNA Painter to solve your DNA questions.
Fri, August 20 2021: 0:00 UTC
4:30
1.5K views
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3 More Gmail Tips
Learn three more Gmail tips that will help your organize your Gmail!
Learn three more Gmail tips that will help your organize your Gmail!
Fri, August 13 2021: 0:00 UTC