Understanding and Using Scottish Kirk Session Records

Paul Milner FUGA, MDiv
Free

Scottish Kirk Session records have recently come online at ScotlandsPeople. Learn what they represent within the Scottish court process, how they operated and what you will find in the records. Understand how to identify the records needed, how to search and where to go next.

Fri, September 9 2022: 18:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Paul Milner, a native of northern England, is a professional genealogist and internationally known lecturer with 30 years’ experience, specializing in British Isles research. Here’s the backstory about Paul:
Learn more...

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