Tío Juvenal: Putting the Records, Context & Strategies All Together

Colleen Robledo Greene, MLIS
Free

This 20th century Mexican and Mexican-American case study showcases and weaves together different types of records available online, as well as those that need to be viewed at or requested from physical archives, and family interviews. It demonstrates the essential role that understanding historical context and customs plays in analyzing sources and building out a more comprehensive family history.

Fri, November 17 2023: 19:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Colleen Robledo Greene, MLIS, is an academic librarian, college educator, and tech nerd who has been researching her family history since 1997. She is the Digital Literacy Librarian at California State University, Fullerton, and also teaches an on
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