Researching Cornish Ancestors

Lesley Trotter, PhD
Free

Discover the key resources available for researching Cornish ancestry. Learn about the different archives in Cornwall, what they hold and how to access their collections. Find out which Cornish records are available online and where to find them. Hear about the finding aids and local groups that can help with your research, and get a better understanding of how key features of Cornish history like Methodism, mining and migration shaped Cornish family histories. Whether you are researching from afar or planning to visit Cornwall, this talk will help you with starting to research your Cornish ancestors. Please note that the talk assumes you have already watched ‘Introduction to County Research in England’.

Fri, July 12 2024: 18:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Dr Lesley Trotter is a social historian, professional genealogist and writer with a special interest in the history of Cornwall, where she is based. Lesley is an Associate of AGRA (Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives) and an Ho
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