Lloyd’s of London: its history and its records for shipping

Paul Milner FUGA, MDiv
Dec 7, 2022
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Content

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Welcome
1m 27s
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Speaker's Introduction
54s
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Introduction
4m 39s
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Lloyd's Register
13m 56s
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The Records
12m 52s
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Complete Documents List
7m 54s
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Casualty Returns
7m 06s
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Podcast
2m 31s
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Locating Resources
9m 57s
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Announcements / prizes
6m 13s
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Questions / answers
23m 00s

About this webinar

Lloyd’s Shipping Lists, and the allied publications are the go-to resources for information about merchant shipping over 100 tons worldwide since 1696. Lloyd’s of London created its first news sheet in 1696. Its successor Lloyd’s List issued in 1734 was a weekly journal of news about ships arriving in English and Irish ports. The New Lloyd’s List ran as a rival beginning in 1769, and replaced it 1773, dropping New after 1788. The frequency of publication changed to daily with annual indexes, advertisements were introduced in 1854. Lloyd’s Weekly Shipping Index began publication in 1880. Further changes were made especially during WWI and WWI with additional records being created. Shipping records are still being produced. The Lists created by Lloyd’s are the go-to place for shipping over 100 tons worldwide to get information on the vessels, their masters, and their owners. The presentation will show examples of the different records and how to interpret and understand the information contained. We will look at what is online, and where to look when not online. Plus, once identified where can one look for more information about the ships and the people involved.

About the speaker

About the speaker

Paul Milner, a native of northern England, is a professional genealogist and internationally known lecturer with 30 years’ experience, specializing in British Isles research. Here’s the backstory about Paul:
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  1. JT
    Janet Thomson
    2 months ago

    Thank you for this great webinar on “close reading” of a source! I loved the information, and your curiosity which compelled you to explore this great set of sources! I particularly loved your careful attention to “Keys” and close reading of multiple lines of multiple descriptions! Your presentations always involve great detail, and it is much appreciated. I really like your use of explanations to guide us to further explicate–and think–about where information can be found (and how it might be used). Thanks again, Paul.

    Reply
  2. KP
    Karen Prytula
    2 months ago

    I hope we have him back again; he is very knowledgeable and a pleasure to listen to.

    Reply
  3. AW
    Allison Willis
    2 months ago

    Very interesting Webinar!!! I would definitely join it again and any other Webinars, All of them have been great so far…

    Reply
  4. EP
    Elaine Palmer
    2 months ago

    Hadn’t realised all of that information was available.

    Reply
  5. CC
    Christine Chesters
    2 months ago

    I heard about Lloyd’s of London but was unaware of the vast amount of information that existed. I can now provide even more context to my great-grandparents’ voyage to America. This was a MUST-SEE webinar!

    Reply
  6. BA
    beverly anderson
    2 months ago

    Very interesting!

    Reply
  7. SH
    Sally Hamblen
    2 months ago

    One of my favorite sources lately has been Lloyd’s Register- I have been researching my sea-faring ancestors. Excellent presentation and I look forward to using Paul’s tips!

    Reply
  8. JB
    John Byers
    2 months ago

    An excellent presentation

    Reply

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