Before the Revolutionary War, geography, topography and a strong indigenous people presence shaped migration patterns. This webinar covers the dominant push-pull forces and challenges for colonial migration. Using maps and other graphics, the major migration routes by region will be described: New England, mid-Atlantic and southward from Virginia. Famous paths such as the Kings Highway, the Great Valley Road, and the Fall Line Road as well as less well-known paths such as the Greenwood Path and the Forbidden Path will be covered. Using a set of case studies, the process of locating clues in local histories, land records, and vital records is unfolded.

Wed, October 19 2022: 18:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Ann G. Lawthers, Sc.D. is a Genealogist with the Brue Family Learning Center at the New England Historic Genealogical Society – American Ancestors. When at the Boston Research Center, she works with patrons to help them explore and expand their fa
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