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Historical Records

Watch webinars that focus on specific record categories including adoption, vital records, cemetery records, census records, city directories, immigration records, newspapers and more for locations around the world.

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1:28:36
Urban Mapping Tools
This presentation will suggest strategies to correlate large amounts of information often developed in urban research, with a significant emphasis on the use of cartographic resources. Generally, researchers of urban settings have an abundance of sources to consider. Many times, the challenge is to connect and analyze multiple, even overwhelming, amounts of information. A variety of resources will be discussed, especially, cadastral maps (land ownership), Sanborn fire insurance maps and city directories.
This presentation will suggest strategies to correlate large amounts of information often developed in urban research, with a significant emphasis on the use of cartographic resources. Generally, researchers of urban settings have an abundance of sources to consider. Many times, the challenge is to connect and analyze multiple, even overwhelming, amounts of information. A variety of resources will be discussed, especially, cadastral maps (land ownership), Sanborn fire insurance maps and city directories.
Wed, April 19 2023: 0:00 UTC
59:36
A Deep Dive into the Map Collections of the Library of Congress
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
Fri, September 23 2022: 15:30 UTC
1:05:54
Mining Washington-area Map Repositories
A survey of both online and physical map repositories located in the Washington, DC, area is presented in this webinar.
A survey of both online and physical map repositories located in the Washington, DC, area is presented in this webinar.
Thu, May 16 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:06:55
2.7K views
CC
50 Websites for Finding Maps
Learn more about where to find maps and the diversity of map websites found online with 50 suggestions you can start using today.
Learn more about where to find maps and the diversity of map websites found online with 50 suggestions you can start using today.
Fri, May 3 2019: 0:00 UTC
55:16
Genealogical Applications of Historical GIS
Learn to use these new tools to expand your research tools. GIS (geographic information system) is a database of geographic information. Google Earth is an example of a large and very sophisticated GIS application.
Learn to use these new tools to expand your research tools. GIS (geographic information system) is a database of geographic information. Google Earth is an example of a large and very sophisticated GIS application.
Fri, July 20 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:32:03
4.3K views
CC
Using Maps in Genealogical Research
Every ancestor, at every moment, occupied a specific, physical location. Maps decode and amplify the significance of those locations by providing context and background information. This heavily illustrated lecture shows examples of the map types best-suited to genealogy, and the syllabus provides links to quality online sources for those maps….
Every ancestor, at every moment, occupied a specific, physical location. Maps decode and amplify the significance of those locations by providing context and background information. This heavily illustrated lecture shows examples of the map types best-suited to genealogy, and the syllabus provides links to quality online sources for those maps….
Tue, June 19 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:11:44
Using Military Maps in Genealogy
Military maps have some obvious value to the family researcher. If our person of interest was in a military unit or fought in a battle we might want to understand the battle or locate his unit, knowing he was there at that time and place.
Military maps have some obvious value to the family researcher. If our person of interest was in a military unit or fought in a battle we might want to understand the battle or locate his unit, knowing he was there at that time and place.
Fri, February 9 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:30:11
3.7K views
Southern States Migration Patterns
Why did people migrate from one location to another? What routes did they follow, and how can identifying migration trails help you find your ancestors? Learn from maps and historical details how to follow the trail of your ancestors into and out of the Southern states.
Why did people migrate from one location to another? What routes did they follow, and how can identifying migration trails help you find your ancestors? Learn from maps and historical details how to follow the trail of your ancestors into and out of the Southern states.
Wed, October 11 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:02:43
Where is That? Using Eastern European Atlases, Maps and Gazetteers
In this webinar, you will discover genealogy research methods for finding your ancestor's point of origin. Learn how to use tools such as maps, atlases, and gazetteers to research localities through place name changes and ever-shifting political and geographical boundaries.
In this webinar, you will discover genealogy research methods for finding your ancestor's point of origin. Learn how to use tools such as maps, atlases, and gazetteers to research localities through place name changes and ever-shifting political and geographical boundaries.
Fri, September 8 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:46:16
Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps
Land ownership maps in the US are generally focused on the county level. Produced largely in the nineteenth-century in single sheet or atlas format, they were sold by subscription and also developed to commemorate events such as the centennial of the American Revolution. Though advances in printing such as lithography…
Land ownership maps in the US are generally focused on the county level. Produced largely in the nineteenth-century in single sheet or atlas format, they were sold by subscription and also developed to commemorate events such as the centennial of the American Revolution. Though advances in printing such as lithography…
Wed, April 26 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:55:56
4.8K views
Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records
Use USGS topographic maps, tract maps, plat maps, surveys, deeds, census records, and tax lists to reconstruct the neighborhood where your ancestor lived. Plat your ancestor’s land records and discover what unexpected clues might be discovered in the process.
Use USGS topographic maps, tract maps, plat maps, surveys, deeds, census records, and tax lists to reconstruct the neighborhood where your ancestor lived. Plat your ancestor’s land records and discover what unexpected clues might be discovered in the process.
Wed, April 19 2017: 0:00 UTC
Advanced
1:41:08
7.5K views
Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research
Learn how to find free digital maps for your ancestral locations, add them as permanent overlays to Google Earth, and then organize them into your personal map reference collection. You’ll learn best practices for keeping them organized and enriching your research.
Learn how to find free digital maps for your ancestral locations, add them as permanent overlays to Google Earth, and then organize them into your personal map reference collection. You’ll learn best practices for keeping them organized and enriching your research.
Wed, January 18 2017: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (147)
Tue, March 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Getting the Scoop on Your Ancestors from Old Newspapers
Tue, March 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Newspapers are treasure troves of historical and genealogical information. Moshe Etlis, Senior Product Manager at MyHeritage, will show you how MyHeritage’s technology has made it easier than ever to discover fascinating information and stories about your ancestors in old newspapers.
Newspapers are treasure troves of historical and genealogical information. Moshe Etlis, Senior Product Manager at MyHeritage, will show you how MyHeritage’s technology has made it easier than ever to discover fascinating information and stories about your ancestors in old newspapers.
Tue, March 12 2024: 18:00 UTC
Census Clues: Sweet Potato Simon, White Potato Willie, & Cows that Grow Wool
Fri, March 22 2024: 18:00 UTC
Census records are the most used—and yet the most underused—of all genealogical resources. Every major provider offers them, along with an index so we can easily find our people. Aside from a year here or there, when a pesky ancestor seems to have eluded the census taker, the use of censuses seems fairly straightforward: We use a search engine to find our person and we copy down the data. There, done! No. Not at all! Censuses provide “facts,” but in between those “facts” there are a wealth of clues we can mine to solve our worst problems with identity, origin, and parentage. This session is for advanced researchers who think they “already know all about census records” and for newer researchers who want to avoid the mistakes most researchers make.
Census records are the most used—and yet the most underused—of all genealogical resources. Every major provider offers them, along with an index so we can easily find our people. Aside from a year here or there, when a pesky ancestor seems to have eluded the census taker, the use of censuses seems fairly straightforward: We use a search engine to find our person and we copy down the data. There, done! No. Not at all! Censuses provide “facts,” but in between those “facts” there are a wealth of clues we can mine to solve our worst problems with identity, origin, and parentage. This session is for advanced researchers who think they “already know all about census records” and for newer researchers who want to avoid the mistakes most researchers make.
Fri, March 22 2024: 18:00 UTC
Tue, March 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Government Money: MyHeritage’s U.S. Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936–2007
Tue, March 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Following the money isn’t just for crimes — it solves genealogical research questions, too! The U.S. Social Security Claims and Applications Collection contains names of applicants, birth dates and places, and names of parents that include the mother’s maiden name. Need information? Find it here!
Following the money isn’t just for crimes — it solves genealogical research questions, too! The U.S. Social Security Claims and Applications Collection contains names of applicants, birth dates and places, and names of parents that include the mother’s maiden name. Need information? Find it here!
Tue, March 26 2024: 18:00 UTC
Fri, April 5 2024: 18:00 UTC
From This Day Forward – Documenting Marital Unions of Enslaved and Emancipated Persons
Fri, April 5 2024: 18:00 UTC
Despite the fact that their marriages were not legally recognized before 1865, enslaved couples were uniting in “quasi-marital” relationships, and were cohabitating as husband and wife, as evidenced by many extant documents created during and after the end of America’s Civil War. In this presentation, we explore examples of documents that provide evidence of these relationships, and sources for finding them.
Despite the fact that their marriages were not legally recognized before 1865, enslaved couples were uniting in “quasi-marital” relationships, and were cohabitating as husband and wife, as evidenced by many extant documents created during and after the end of America’s Civil War. In this presentation, we explore examples of documents that provide evidence of these relationships, and sources for finding them.
Fri, April 5 2024: 18:00 UTC
Thu, April 11 2024: 21:00 UTC
Silent Storytellers: A Genealogist’s Guide to Cemetery Photography
Thu, April 11 2024: 21:00 UTC
They stand there behind those gates: marble and granite memorials to those who went before. The stones in those cemeteries and the stories they tell for our families are of crucial importance to genealogists. How can we best get access to the land where they stand, and photograph them to capture the stories they tell?
They stand there behind those gates: marble and granite memorials to those who went before. The stones in those cemeteries and the stories they tell for our families are of crucial importance to genealogists. How can we best get access to the land where they stand, and photograph them to capture the stories they tell?
Thu, April 11 2024: 21:00 UTC
Fri, April 12 2024: 13:00 UTC
Can’t Find the Family Bible? 10 Places You May Not Have Looked
Fri, April 12 2024: 13:00 UTC
The Family Bible is one record source genealogy researchers long to find. Yet, it can also be one of the most difficult of all genealogy records to find. The loss of the Family Bible in a family line does not mean a genealogy researcher is out of options. Explore 10 places outside of the family to seek out Family Bibles.
The Family Bible is one record source genealogy researchers long to find. Yet, it can also be one of the most difficult of all genealogy records to find. The loss of the Family Bible in a family line does not mean a genealogy researcher is out of options. Explore 10 places outside of the family to seek out Family Bibles.
Fri, April 12 2024: 13:00 UTC
Fri, April 12 2024: 15:00 UTC
Unlocking Birth Records: Exploring Birth Dates and Alternate Sources
Fri, April 12 2024: 15:00 UTC
Birth records are more than just dates — they hold the beginnings of your ancestors’ stories, revealing a wealth of information beyond the moment they entered the world. Are you mining these records for all they’re worth? Join Lisa Lisson for a deep dive into birth records, from discovering MyHeritage’s extensive collection to uncovering the rich details within. This session will equip you with practical techniques for unearthing accurate birth dates and enhancing your family history research. Plus, we’ll explore alternate sources that can shed even more light on your ancestors’ beginnings. Walk away with a newfound ability to breathe life into your ancestors’ stories.
Birth records are more than just dates — they hold the beginnings of your ancestors’ stories, revealing a wealth of information beyond the moment they entered the world. Are you mining these records for all they’re worth? Join Lisa Lisson for a deep dive into birth records, from discovering MyHeritage’s extensive collection to uncovering the rich details within. This session will equip you with practical techniques for unearthing accurate birth dates and enhancing your family history research. Plus, we’ll explore alternate sources that can shed even more light on your ancestors’ beginnings. Walk away with a newfound ability to breathe life into your ancestors’ stories.
Fri, April 12 2024: 15:00 UTC
Fri, April 12 2024: 19:00 UTC
Using U.S. Church Records as a Brick Wall Strategy: Case Studies
Fri, April 12 2024: 19:00 UTC
Finding an overseas ancestral hometown. Tracking a family from one place to another. Researching in a place with record loss. Identifying all the children of an ancestral couple. Finding (or verifying) a birth, marriage or death. Researching extended families. Searching for ancestors who were poor, non-English speaking, ethnic minorities or enslaved. Got any of these brick-wall situations? Learn how church records may be your saving grace.
Finding an overseas ancestral hometown. Tracking a family from one place to another. Researching in a place with record loss. Identifying all the children of an ancestral couple. Finding (or verifying) a birth, marriage or death. Researching extended families. Searching for ancestors who were poor, non-English speaking, ethnic minorities or enslaved. Got any of these brick-wall situations? Learn how church records may be your saving grace.
Fri, April 12 2024: 19:00 UTC
Wed, April 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Comparing Plats of Land With Deeds and Grants
Wed, April 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Land Plats of an ancestor’s land will likely include his surrounding neighbors. With a closer examination, we might gain an understanding of their lives and place them with their community and local events.
Land Plats of an ancestor’s land will likely include his surrounding neighbors. With a closer examination, we might gain an understanding of their lives and place them with their community and local events.
Wed, April 17 2024: 18:00 UTC