30
of
1,915 Webinars Clear filters
Sort by
Sort by
48:34
144 views
CC
Free
Can Americans get a legal Coat of Arms from Scotland?
Can an American get a legal Coat of Arms in Scotland? It is possible, and many have, but it’s not necessarily straightforward or simple. Dr Bruce Durie addresses the How and the Why of Scottish Heraldry.
Can an American get a legal Coat of Arms in Scotland? It is possible, and many have, but it’s not necessarily straightforward or simple. Dr Bruce Durie addresses the How and the Why of Scottish Heraldry.
Fri, September 16 2022: 10:00 UTC
1:26:50
Understanding and Using Scottish Kirk Session Records
Scottish Kirk Session records have recently come online at ScotlandsPeople. Learn what they represent within the Scottish court process, how they operated and what you will find in the records. Understand how to identify the records needed, how to search and where to go next.
Scottish Kirk Session records have recently come online at ScotlandsPeople. Learn what they represent within the Scottish court process, how they operated and what you will find in the records. Understand how to identify the records needed, how to search and where to go next.
Fri, September 9 2022: 18:00 UTC
47:16
846 views
CC
Who were the Scots-Irish?
Known in their homeland as Ulster-Scots, these mainly Lowland Scots left their homeland and settled in Ulster during the Plantation, sometimes staying only for a few generations and then many made their way to the New World. Why did these Scots come to Ulster and why did they then subsequently leave? What were the push and pull factors? Why did Presbyterian ministers have such sway over these people? We will look at the perils they faced on their transatlantic journey and what they found when they arrived in the new world. We will examine the range of records and sources where you may find your Ulster-Scots ancestors and that can tell you more about this pioneering ethnic group that produced a number of US Presidents and millions of descendants worldwide today.
Known in their homeland as Ulster-Scots, these mainly Lowland Scots left their homeland and settled in Ulster during the Plantation, sometimes staying only for a few generations and then many made their way to the New World. Why did these Scots come to Ulster and why did they then subsequently leave? What were the push and pull factors? Why did Presbyterian ministers have such sway over these people? We will look at the perils they faced on their transatlantic journey and what they found when they arrived in the new world. We will examine the range of records and sources where you may find your Ulster-Scots ancestors and that can tell you more about this pioneering ethnic group that produced a number of US Presidents and millions of descendants worldwide today.
Fri, April 8 2022: 9:00 UTC
46:52
489 views
CC
Clans and Families in Scotland
Everyone from Scotland is in a Clan, right? Wrong. The Clan was a phenomenon of only certain parts of Scotland, and not the majority. Is your surname associated with a Highland or Borders Clan or a Lowlands Family? If so, what can you do about it?
Everyone from Scotland is in a Clan, right? Wrong. The Clan was a phenomenon of only certain parts of Scotland, and not the majority. Is your surname associated with a Highland or Borders Clan or a Lowlands Family? If so, what can you do about it?
Fri, April 8 2022: 8:00 UTC
1:22:47
825 views
CC
Finding Your Scottish Ancestors in Canada
Scots began coming to Canada in the mid 1600s, first as entrepreneurs – men on the make, and then as a means to an end – ways to enjoy a better life and to have the opportunity to own their own land. Others were sent to Canada in hopes of…
Scots began coming to Canada in the mid 1600s, first as entrepreneurs – men on the make, and then as a means to an end – ways to enjoy a better life and to have the opportunity to own their own land. Others were sent to Canada in hopes of…
Fri, November 19 2021: 19:00 UTC
1:06:29
437 views
CC
British and Irish Given Names – Part 2
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Have you noticed that the given names of our eighteenth and nineteenth century English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh ancestors were drawn from a surprisingly small pool? But how small a pool? How common were our ancestors’ given names? More importantly, how rare were the less common names? Lists of the most common 10, 20, 50 or 100 names are surprisingly unhelpful unless they include frequency statistics. For example, Jeremiah, was ranked 26th in England in the 1800s but the most useful information is its frequency; it was carried by only one man in 500. Most villages had fewer than 500 males at that time. This webinar focuses on given name popularities, changes in popularity, and the reasons for such changes. It also covers spelling variants, abbreviations, and diminutives. For example, if you don’t know that Polly was a diminutive of Mary or that Nellie was a diminutive of Ellen and Eleanor and Helen, you might struggle to find entries for your ancestors. Our ancestors’ given names and surnames are the gateways into our family history research. Learning more about their names may prove useful in determining their ancestry or finding other family connections.
Fri, September 10 2021: 0:00 UTC
37:12
177 views
CC
How Can I Get a Legal Coat of Arms in Scotland?
There is no such thing as a “Family Coat of Arms” and a Crest is not the same as Arms. Then there are Laws… Then there’s Procedure… But it IS possible!
There is no such thing as a “Family Coat of Arms” and a Crest is not the same as Arms. Then there are Laws… Then there’s Procedure… But it IS possible!
Fri, September 3 2021: 7:00 UTC
1:21:37
4.9K views
CC
Online Sources for Scottish Genealogy Research
There comes a time when you have done all of the online researching you can do using the standard databases. In this talk you will learn of databases that aren't as well known but that can assist in breaking through your brick walls.
There comes a time when you have done all of the online researching you can do using the standard databases. In this talk you will learn of databases that aren't as well known but that can assist in breaking through your brick walls.
Fri, June 18 2021: 18:00 UTC
1:22:25
3.2K views
CC
The Future is Still in the Past: An Introduction to Online Parish Clerks in the United Kingdom
England is divided into 40 administrative counties which traditionally were each comprised of various numbers of ecclesiastical parishes. Each parish had its own church that administered to both the spiritual and the secular needs of the community. In 1538, Thomas Cromwell, chief minister of Henry VIII, issued The Second Henrician…
England is divided into 40 administrative counties which traditionally were each comprised of various numbers of ecclesiastical parishes. Each parish had its own church that administered to both the spiritual and the secular needs of the community. In 1538, Thomas Cromwell, chief minister of Henry VIII, issued The Second Henrician…
Fri, May 1 2020: 0:00 UTC
48:47
6.0K views
CC
“My Ancestors were Normans” – Oh really? Prove it!
Join Dr Bruce Durie on a canter through the genealogy of Norman ancestors.
Join Dr Bruce Durie on a canter through the genealogy of Norman ancestors.
Fri, March 13 2020: 0:00 UTC
1:21:36
20.6K views
CC
How to trace your UK ancestry
From the comfort of your home (outside the UK), trying to uncover your roots (whether in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales) can be an extremely challenging task. However, it is far from impossible with a plethora of information available online from books to databases, transcriptions to images, photographs and other…
From the comfort of your home (outside the UK), trying to uncover your roots (whether in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales) can be an extremely challenging task. However, it is far from impossible with a plethora of information available online from books to databases, transcriptions to images, photographs and other…
Wed, December 18 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:11:36
810 views
CC
The Fromelles Genealogy Project: Reuniting WW1 Soldiers with their Families
This presentation will tell the story of the Fromelles Project with a specific focus on how genealogical detective work has so far helped to identify 166 of the Fromelles soldiers and give them named graves in the first military cemetery to be built in France since WWII.
This presentation will tell the story of the Fromelles Project with a specific focus on how genealogical detective work has so far helped to identify 166 of the Fromelles soldiers and give them named graves in the first military cemetery to be built in France since WWII.
Fri, November 22 2019: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (165)
Fri, February 3 2023: 19:00 UTC
Gradual Emancipation and Enslavement in the North
Fri, February 3 2023: 19:00 UTC
Slavery existed in some northern states well into the 19th century. Learn about the motives for gradual emancipation, how it affected enslaved African Americans and enslavers at this time, the state laws surrounding slavery, and the records that it created.
Slavery existed in some northern states well into the 19th century. Learn about the motives for gradual emancipation, how it affected enslaved African Americans and enslavers at this time, the state laws surrounding slavery, and the records that it created.
Fri, February 3 2023: 19:00 UTC
Wed, February 8 2023: 19:00 UTC
Hints & Tips for solving Irish cases of Unknown Parentage
Wed, February 8 2023: 19:00 UTC
There are many examples of Unknown Parentage cases in Ireland – illegal adoptees, a foundling grandparent, or simply an Irish Brick Wall. This talk explores the approach to solving these cases, the challenges faced with Irish records, and some hints & tips to overcome them.
There are many examples of Unknown Parentage cases in Ireland – illegal adoptees, a foundling grandparent, or simply an Irish Brick Wall. This talk explores the approach to solving these cases, the challenges faced with Irish records, and some hints & tips to overcome them.
Wed, February 8 2023: 19:00 UTC
Fri, February 17 2023: 19:00 UTC
Family History on the Canadian Prairies
Fri, February 17 2023: 19:00 UTC
Most Canadians have connections to the three Prairie provinces, through cousins if not through ancestors. Researching those Prairie families can be rewarding, although it is important to note which sources are common to all three provinces, and which ones are unique to each province. Using examples from Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta, this session looks at a variety of resources, and offers tips to help you learn more about your families on the Prairies.
Most Canadians have connections to the three Prairie provinces, through cousins if not through ancestors. Researching those Prairie families can be rewarding, although it is important to note which sources are common to all three provinces, and which ones are unique to each province. Using examples from Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta, this session looks at a variety of resources, and offers tips to help you learn more about your families on the Prairies.
Fri, February 17 2023: 19:00 UTC
Wed, March 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
Tips and Tools for Navigating the English Probate System
Wed, March 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
The probate system in England and Wales changed significantly in 1858. Learn how the English probate system worked before and after that change, see what records are available and why they are of value. Learn tips and tools for procedures which will simplify the search process, whether the ancestor’s location in England is known or unknown.
The probate system in England and Wales changed significantly in 1858. Learn how the English probate system worked before and after that change, see what records are available and why they are of value. Learn tips and tools for procedures which will simplify the search process, whether the ancestor’s location in England is known or unknown.
Wed, March 1 2023: 1:00 UTC
Thu, March 9 2023: 1:00 UTC
Finding Prussian Ancestors in Online Archives
Thu, March 9 2023: 1:00 UTC
Discover online records for German-speaking ancestors from Brandenburg, East Prussia, Pomerania, Posen, Silesia, and West Prussia. Despite some record loss for these geographic areas, hundreds of years of church and civil records can be found in archives in Poland, Germany, and the US, using the search strategies in this presentation.
Discover online records for German-speaking ancestors from Brandenburg, East Prussia, Pomerania, Posen, Silesia, and West Prussia. Despite some record loss for these geographic areas, hundreds of years of church and civil records can be found in archives in Poland, Germany, and the US, using the search strategies in this presentation.
Thu, March 9 2023: 1:00 UTC
Fri, March 17 2023: 18:00 UTC
Padrones of the Past: Colonial-era Censuses of Mexico
Fri, March 17 2023: 18:00 UTC
Thousands of localized censuses, or padrones, were taken all over Mexico during the Colonial era. Mostly created during the 17th to 19th centuries, these censuses provide a snapshot in time of our ancestral families. Learn to find these censuses for your research locations and discover the content they may hold.
Thousands of localized censuses, or padrones, were taken all over Mexico during the Colonial era. Mostly created during the 17th to 19th centuries, these censuses provide a snapshot in time of our ancestral families. Learn to find these censuses for your research locations and discover the content they may hold.
Fri, March 17 2023: 18:00 UTC
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Looking for ‘Aliens’ Down Under: A Guide to Australian Naturalisation Records
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Following the founding of the colony of Australia, individuals born in the British Empire were considered British subjects, irrespective of the nationality of their parents. Residents of Australia whose native place was outside of the British Empire were not afforded the same rights and privileges as British subjects. These rights, in particular the right to buy land and vote, could be conferred to an individual by a process known as naturalisation. This bureaucratic process generated multiple sets of records that contain a wealth of genealogical information. This talk will outline the complex history of naturalisation in Australia, the changing terminology used, how, when and why naturalisation records were created, and discuss the likely availability of records and for whom they may have been created.
Kristy Love
Following the founding of the colony of Australia, individuals born in the British Empire were considered British subjects, irrespective of the nationality of their parents. Residents of Australia whose native place was outside of the British Empire were not afforded the same rights and privileges as British subjects. These rights, in particular the right to buy land and vote, could be conferred to an individual by a process known as naturalisation. This bureaucratic process generated multiple sets of records that contain a wealth of genealogical information. This talk will outline the complex history of naturalisation in Australia, the changing terminology used, how, when and why naturalisation records were created, and discuss the likely availability of records and for whom they may have been created.
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
Tick Marks and Number Counts: Understanding and Using the Slave Schedules
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
What exactly are the 1850 and 1860 United States Slave Schedules and what is their value to researchers? A closer look at this enumeration of “slave inhabitants” will streamline interpretation of these records and will help define the do’s and don’ts of working with them.
What exactly are the 1850 and 1860 United States Slave Schedules and what is their value to researchers? A closer look at this enumeration of “slave inhabitants” will streamline interpretation of these records and will help define the do’s and don’ts of working with them.
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
Thu, April 13 2023: 22:00 UTC
Spanish & Latin American Records on MyHeritage
Thu, April 13 2023: 22:00 UTC
Researching Hispanic and/or Latino ancestors? Daniel Horowitz will introduce you to the wealth of historical collections from Spain and Latin America on offer at MyHeritage and give you important pointers for searching and analyzing them.
Researching Hispanic and/or Latino ancestors? Daniel Horowitz will introduce you to the wealth of historical collections from Spain and Latin America on offer at MyHeritage and give you important pointers for searching and analyzing them.
Thu, April 13 2023: 22:00 UTC