6
of
1,772 Webinars Clear filters
Sort by
Sort by
1:13:02
Planning Research
Genealogical proof requires the conduct of reasonably exhaustive research. The thorough research required by the Genealogical Proof Standard should not be undertaken in a haphazard manner. This webinar provides useful tips on developing an effective research plan, including the importance of crafting a focused research question and prioritizing potentially relevant…
Genealogical proof requires the conduct of reasonably exhaustive research. The thorough research required by the Genealogical Proof Standard should not be undertaken in a haphazard manner. This webinar provides useful tips on developing an effective research plan, including the importance of crafting a focused research question and prioritizing potentially relevant…
Wed, November 17 2021: 1:00 UTC
1:26:59
Developing Good Research Habits
Developing those good, er, successful research habits takes planning, time, experience, and patience to be effective. Learn steps and tools for becoming a better researcher both at home and in repositories, and for developing successful habits that make the most of your genealogy time budget.
Developing those good, er, successful research habits takes planning, time, experience, and patience to be effective. Learn steps and tools for becoming a better researcher both at home and in repositories, and for developing successful habits that make the most of your genealogy time budget.
Tue, May 15 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:22:58
5.9K views
Quality, Time and Completion: Developing a Research Plan (Part Two)
This session will take a closer look at the focus of research plans used by professionals. Practical examples will be shared and a step-by-step process will be included. Using real life examples and patterns from busy professionals, learn how to make plans that work for you.
This session will take a closer look at the focus of research plans used by professionals. Practical examples will be shared and a step-by-step process will be included. Using real life examples and patterns from busy professionals, learn how to make plans that work for you.
Fri, January 12 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:35:54
17.0K views
CC
Quality, Time and Completion: Developing a Research Plan (Part One)
This session will focus on the effort to balance time, quality and completion of a research project. The first segment will look at the process from research concept to logistics including the conflicting issues between the researcher and previous research. This will include the movement from basic data collection, evaluation…
This session will focus on the effort to balance time, quality and completion of a research project. The first segment will look at the process from research concept to logistics including the conflicting issues between the researcher and previous research. This will include the movement from basic data collection, evaluation…
Wed, January 10 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:27:55
10.4K views
CC
Did I Get Everything? Creating a Checklist for Genealogy Research
Are you really done with researching that ancestor? Many genealogists think they have a brick wall when, in fact, they just haven't done a reasonably exhaustive search. Learn how to assemble a genealogy research checklist to take your genealogy to the next level.
Are you really done with researching that ancestor? Many genealogists think they have a brick wall when, in fact, they just haven't done a reasonably exhaustive search. Learn how to assemble a genealogy research checklist to take your genealogy to the next level.
Wed, January 3 2018: 0:00 UTC
Advanced
1:29:46
5.6K views
Researching with Marian! Creating a Research Plan with YOUR Research
You've watched her solve brick walls and create research plans. Now Marian Pierre-Louis will show you strategies for some of your very own Connecticut, Rhode Island, or Massachusetts research problems.
You've watched her solve brick walls and create research plans. Now Marian Pierre-Louis will show you strategies for some of your very own Connecticut, Rhode Island, or Massachusetts research problems.
Wed, November 6 2013: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (82)
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Five Wives & A Feather Bed: Using Indirect and Negative Evidence to Resolve Conflicting Claims
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Indirect Evidence – A Case Study
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Documents + DNA + Method + a little bit of Luck: Combining Tools to Find Biological Family
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Finding an adopted child’s biological family is especially challenging for genealogists. This presentation list the steps one can take to identify an unknown parent or grandparent and dissects a successful case to show how good methodology combined with document research and DNA matches can put a decades-old question to rest.
Finding an adopted child’s biological family is especially challenging for genealogists. This presentation list the steps one can take to identify an unknown parent or grandparent and dissects a successful case to show how good methodology combined with document research and DNA matches can put a decades-old question to rest.
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
Negative Evidence: Making Something Out of Nothing
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
When is not finding a record nothing, and when does it signify something? Information that is not where you expect it to be may yield important evidence for your research question. Understanding the purpose of a source — who and what it records, and why — will help you determine if the missing person or event is negative evidence or merely a negative search. A series of examples demonstrate methodologies used to create something out of nothing.
When is not finding a record nothing, and when does it signify something? Information that is not where you expect it to be may yield important evidence for your research question. Understanding the purpose of a source — who and what it records, and why — will help you determine if the missing person or event is negative evidence or merely a negative search. A series of examples demonstrate methodologies used to create something out of nothing.
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
A Deep Dive into the Map Collections of the Library of Congress
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Ancestors’ Religions in the U.S.
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Religious records are essential in genealogy research. Do you know all ancestors’ religions? Review the Protestant Reformation and religions in the U.S. Find your ancestor.
Religious records are essential in genealogy research. Do you know all ancestors’ religions? Review the Protestant Reformation and religions in the U.S. Find your ancestor.
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Finding Fayette’s Father: Autosomal DNA Reveals Misattributed Parentage
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Traditional documentation clearly identified Fayette’s father without conflict. However, the DNA results of Fayette’s descendants told a different story. Learn how DNA evidence combined with a trail of clues and the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard revealed a secret from the summer of 1913.
Traditional documentation clearly identified Fayette’s father without conflict. However, the DNA results of Fayette’s descendants told a different story. Learn how DNA evidence combined with a trail of clues and the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard revealed a secret from the summer of 1913.
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Abstracting Documents: An Essential Skill for All Genealogists
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Every document that is used during genealogical research must be thoroughly and accurately analyzed. Abstracting is a fundamental part of this research and analyzing process. Yet many genealogists are not confident in their ability to perform this task effectively and efficiently. This causes researchers to avoid the abstracting process resulting in research errors. An abstract is a summary of all the important details in a document. This presentation will examine the abstracting process by using examples that show how to abstract a variety of documents, general guidelines for abstracting, what to include and what to eliminate when creating an abstract, and lastly will explore some problems that might be encountered while abstracting.
Every document that is used during genealogical research must be thoroughly and accurately analyzed. Abstracting is a fundamental part of this research and analyzing process. Yet many genealogists are not confident in their ability to perform this task effectively and efficiently. This causes researchers to avoid the abstracting process resulting in research errors. An abstract is a summary of all the important details in a document. This presentation will examine the abstracting process by using examples that show how to abstract a variety of documents, general guidelines for abstracting, what to include and what to eliminate when creating an abstract, and lastly will explore some problems that might be encountered while abstracting.
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC
When Wrong is Actually Right: Constructing Proof Arguments for Counterintuitive Conflicts (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC