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1.3K views
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Preparing for your Trip to the Family History Library
A lot of genealogists call the Family History Library in Salt Lake City their “Mecca,” and since it’s the world largest repository of genealogical materials, that designation is fitting. This presentation runs through the library’s history, its prime resources and how planning ahead can make your trip more rewarding.
A lot of genealogists call the Family History Library in Salt Lake City their “Mecca,” and since it’s the world largest repository of genealogical materials, that designation is fitting. This presentation runs through the library’s history, its prime resources and how planning ahead can make your trip more rewarding.
Fri, February 15 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:12:54
1.7K views
CC
Get set, GO! Planning and Executing a Successful Research Trip
Everyone will hit a wall in what they can obtain online for their family history project. Get practical tools, tips, and tricks for a successful genealogy research trip which can exponentially grow and develop your genealogy research.
Everyone will hit a wall in what they can obtain online for their family history project. Get practical tools, tips, and tricks for a successful genealogy research trip which can exponentially grow and develop your genealogy research.
Fri, January 25 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:20:59
What Would You Do If You Had Five Days in Washington, DC?
When you have mined web sources for records in Washington, DC, and your appetite has been whetted for a trip to see for yourself the vast array of repositories and sources available there, how will you plan your trip to make the most of the time available? This class presents…
When you have mined web sources for records in Washington, DC, and your appetite has been whetted for a trip to see for yourself the vast array of repositories and sources available there, how will you plan your trip to make the most of the time available? This class presents…
Wed, January 16 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:27:00
That First Trip to the Courthouse
If there is one home truth in genealogy research, it's this: not everything is available online. Sooner or later, every genealogist has got to make that first trip to the courthouse to check out the original records available there. Learn how to prepare for that trip, the rules of the…
If there is one home truth in genealogy research, it's this: not everything is available online. Sooner or later, every genealogist has got to make that first trip to the courthouse to check out the original records available there. Learn how to prepare for that trip, the rules of the…
Wed, April 10 2013: 0:00 UTC
1:36:26
2.5K views
In the Trenches: Successful On-site Research
You've created a great research plan so what happens next? It's time to get out and start visiting libraries, archives and repositories! Join Marian Pierre-Louis as she provides tips for successful on-site visits.
You've created a great research plan so what happens next? It's time to get out and start visiting libraries, archives and repositories! Join Marian Pierre-Louis as she provides tips for successful on-site visits.
Wed, January 16 2013: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (110)
Wed, February 16 2022: 1:00 UTC
It Goes with the Territory! Find Your Ancestors in Pre-statehood Records
Wed, February 16 2022: 1:00 UTC
From the Old Northwest to the Hawaiian Islands, the United States has acquired and settled new lands. If your ancestor pioneered pre-statehood territories, they may have left records valuable to documenting and understanding their lives. Discussion includes a timeline of territorial settlement and governance, and strategies for locating and using territorial records.
From the Old Northwest to the Hawaiian Islands, the United States has acquired and settled new lands. If your ancestor pioneered pre-statehood territories, they may have left records valuable to documenting and understanding their lives. Discussion includes a timeline of territorial settlement and governance, and strategies for locating and using territorial records.
Wed, February 16 2022: 1:00 UTC
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Identifying Unnamed Free Born African Americans – A DNA Case Study
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Identifying unnamed individuals using a Research Plan incorporating genetic evidence takes creativity and patience. This session deconstructs a case study using Genealogy Standards to align and correlate DNA results and fragmentary records for African American families, beginning in 1812 in Virginia and North Carolina.
Identifying unnamed individuals using a Research Plan incorporating genetic evidence takes creativity and patience. This session deconstructs a case study using Genealogy Standards to align and correlate DNA results and fragmentary records for African American families, beginning in 1812 in Virginia and North Carolina.
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, April 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Proving Parentage Two Centuries Later Using DNA Evidence
Wed, April 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Proving immigrant origins may seem daunting, especially when the family lived hundreds of years ago. This presentation shows how to navigate multiple border crossings, name changes, and cultural challenges and apply DNA techniques to trace a family of Canadian immigrants from town to town. The right combination of documentary evidence and biological evidence, coupled with sound methodology, reveals the origins of this family.
Proving immigrant origins may seem daunting, especially when the family lived hundreds of years ago. This presentation shows how to navigate multiple border crossings, name changes, and cultural challenges and apply DNA techniques to trace a family of Canadian immigrants from town to town. The right combination of documentary evidence and biological evidence, coupled with sound methodology, reveals the origins of this family.
Wed, April 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, April 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
Unlocking Stories of Our Female Ancestors through Effective Research Methodology
Wed, April 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
We will explore how implementing standard research methodology may open up new avenues of discovery to unlock previously “hidden” evidence of female ancestors’ stories. Using reasonably exhaustive research, evidence correlation, analysis proof standard elements and cluster research methodology, we can uncover critical information to help us develop our female ancestors’ stories. Today’s discussion includes two case studies of females born in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An exploration of sources, beyond census and marriage records, was required to enhance their life stories. One subject was born into an affluent family who settled in north central Tennessee, and the second was enslaved from birth until Emancipation in western Kentucky.
We will explore how implementing standard research methodology may open up new avenues of discovery to unlock previously “hidden” evidence of female ancestors’ stories. Using reasonably exhaustive research, evidence correlation, analysis proof standard elements and cluster research methodology, we can uncover critical information to help us develop our female ancestors’ stories. Today’s discussion includes two case studies of females born in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An exploration of sources, beyond census and marriage records, was required to enhance their life stories. One subject was born into an affluent family who settled in north central Tennessee, and the second was enslaved from birth until Emancipation in western Kentucky.
Wed, April 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Five Wives & A Feather Bed: Using Indirect and Negative Evidence to Resolve Conflicting Claims
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Indirect Evidence – A Case Study
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Documents + DNA + Method + a little bit of Luck: Combining Tools to Find Biological Family
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Finding an adopted child’s biological family is especially challenging for genealogists. This presentation list the steps one can take to identify an unknown parent or grandparent and dissects a successful case to show how good methodology combined with document research and DNA matches can put a decades-old question to rest.
Finding an adopted child’s biological family is especially challenging for genealogists. This presentation list the steps one can take to identify an unknown parent or grandparent and dissects a successful case to show how good methodology combined with document research and DNA matches can put a decades-old question to rest.
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
Negative Evidence: Making Something Out of Nothing
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
When is not finding a record nothing, and when does it signify something? Information that is not where you expect it to be may yield important evidence for your research question. Understanding the purpose of a source — who and what it records, and why — will help you determine if the missing person or event is negative evidence or merely a negative search. A series of examples demonstrate methodologies used to create something out of nothing.
When is not finding a record nothing, and when does it signify something? Information that is not where you expect it to be may yield important evidence for your research question. Understanding the purpose of a source — who and what it records, and why — will help you determine if the missing person or event is negative evidence or merely a negative search. A series of examples demonstrate methodologies used to create something out of nothing.
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
A Deep Dive into the Map Collections of the Library of Congress
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC