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1:07:23
Welsh Emigration to North America
Examine migration patterns from Wales to the US and Canada, looking at the push and pull factors. An understanding of the group migration and historical processes can help in determining the place of origin. We will examine all the Welsh settlements in the US and Canada.
Examine migration patterns from Wales to the US and Canada, looking at the push and pull factors. An understanding of the group migration and historical processes can help in determining the place of origin. We will examine all the Welsh settlements in the US and Canada.
Fri, September 29 2023: 18:00 UTC
59:42
3.1K views
CC
Free
Tracing migrating ancestors: Who, what, where, when, why and how
We’re all descended from migrants – it’s a fact of history. But who left Europe when? Where did our earliest known ancestors come from? How can we use what we know about family to understand where to look for records? What if we have almost nothing at all? Join MyHeritage’s Director of Content in Europe, Myko Clelland, as we delve into centuries of travel from the old world to the new, getting to grips with the historical rules and patterns that give us the context to better tell our ancestors stories and lead us to new discoveries.
We’re all descended from migrants – it’s a fact of history. But who left Europe when? Where did our earliest known ancestors come from? How can we use what we know about family to understand where to look for records? What if we have almost nothing at all? Join MyHeritage’s Director of Content in Europe, Myko Clelland, as we delve into centuries of travel from the old world to the new, getting to grips with the historical rules and patterns that give us the context to better tell our ancestors stories and lead us to new discoveries.
Fri, September 2 2022: 16:45 UTC
1:10:00
America’s Turnpikes, Rivers, and Canals
Roads and trails are the “go-to” places we look at first when determining how our ancestors moved throughout America. However, there were other means of transportation available to them. Could your ancestor have traveled other by-ways?
Roads and trails are the “go-to” places we look at first when determining how our ancestors moved throughout America. However, there were other means of transportation available to them. Could your ancestor have traveled other by-ways?
Fri, September 3 2021: 12:00 UTC
51:28
2.1K views
CC
The National Road: America's First Federal Highway
Built between 1811 and 1837, the National Road was the first federally-funded highway in America. Extending from Maryland to the frontier of Illinois, this migration route allowed thousands of people to settle in the Midwest.
Built between 1811 and 1837, the National Road was the first federally-funded highway in America. Extending from Maryland to the frontier of Illinois, this migration route allowed thousands of people to settle in the Midwest.
Fri, April 30 2021: 18:00 UTC
49:58
2.4K views
CC
Mother Nature's Impact on Family Migration & Relocation
People have migrated away from their places of birth for eons. Within recorded history we can trace the dislocation of families, indeed whole communities, because of war, politics, religious persecution, racial and cultural intolerance, employment or lifestyle prospects, and any of a number of other societal-related reasons. But there were…
People have migrated away from their places of birth for eons. Within recorded history we can trace the dislocation of families, indeed whole communities, because of war, politics, religious persecution, racial and cultural intolerance, employment or lifestyle prospects, and any of a number of other societal-related reasons. But there were…
Fri, April 9 2021: 0:00 UTC
56:12
How Did My Pennsylvania Ancestor Get There?: Migration Trails West
Considering the trails and reasons why your ancestor left Pennsylvania will give you some clues as to where you might search for his origins there.
Considering the trails and reasons why your ancestor left Pennsylvania will give you some clues as to where you might search for his origins there.
Fri, February 26 2021: 18:00 UTC
1:28:44
2.5K views
CC
Trails of Daniel Boone and other Western Travelers
Learn about the historic trails and trailblazers that lead early settlers to and from Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee and the West. Get specific clues to help you solve difficult research questions.
Learn about the historic trails and trailblazers that lead early settlers to and from Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee and the West. Get specific clues to help you solve difficult research questions.
Wed, July 18 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:30:11
3.7K views
Southern States Migration Patterns
Why did people migrate from one location to another? What routes did they follow, and how can identifying migration trails help you find your ancestors? Learn from maps and historical details how to follow the trail of your ancestors into and out of the Southern states.
Why did people migrate from one location to another? What routes did they follow, and how can identifying migration trails help you find your ancestors? Learn from maps and historical details how to follow the trail of your ancestors into and out of the Southern states.
Wed, October 11 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:27:11
1.6K views
Understanding Family Migration
Moving from one location to another required a major change in living conditions. The choices that led to the decision to move, and the directions of movement are pivotal in understanding those ancestors. What might help you understand the migration choices your ancestors made? How can we develop strategies that…
Moving from one location to another required a major change in living conditions. The choices that led to the decision to move, and the directions of movement are pivotal in understanding those ancestors. What might help you understand the migration choices your ancestors made? How can we develop strategies that…
Thu, June 22 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:03:13
Migration Trails Across America
Americans have always been a nation on the move. There were many reasons that brought them here, and once they were here they didn’t stop. Something “out west” always seemed to beckon them. In this class, we will study the major trails used for migration, and the ethnic…
Americans have always been a nation on the move. There were many reasons that brought them here, and once they were here they didn’t stop. Something “out west” always seemed to beckon them. In this class, we will study the major trails used for migration, and the ethnic…
Wed, May 24 2017: 0:00 UTC
48:08
3.1K views
America's Expansion: The Ohio Country 1783-1812 (BONUS webinar for subscribers)
After the American Revolution and before the War of 1812, the United States consisted of sixteen states. Through the Land Ordinance of 1785, the Greeneville Treaty, and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, Ohio became the first state opening the United States to westward expansion. Discussion includes: Background; Major treaties; Battles…
After the American Revolution and before the War of 1812, the United States consisted of sixteen states. Through the Land Ordinance of 1785, the Greeneville Treaty, and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, Ohio became the first state opening the United States to westward expansion. Discussion includes: Background; Major treaties; Battles…
Thu, October 1 2015: 0:00 UTC
1:54:22
6.2K views
Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860
Why did people migrate from one location to another? What routes did they follow, and how can identifying migration trails help you find your ancestors? Learn from maps and historical details how to follow the trail of your ancestors.
Why did people migrate from one location to another? What routes did they follow, and how can identifying migration trails help you find your ancestors? Learn from maps and historical details how to follow the trail of your ancestors.
Wed, May 27 2015: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (100)
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 1
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Identity Crises: Right Name, Wrong Man? Wrong Name, Right Man?
Fri, May 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
What do we do with ancestors whose names don’t “match” from one record to the next? Or those who pose the opposite problem: too many men or women of the same name? This session examines a litany of social customs and naming patterns that cause ancestors to be known by different names—then offers techniques and strategies by which we can establish that any two records do or do not apply to the same person. A variety of case studies demonstrate the problems and the methods we can use to overcome them.
What do we do with ancestors whose names don’t “match” from one record to the next? Or those who pose the opposite problem: too many men or women of the same name? This session examines a litany of social customs and naming patterns that cause ancestors to be known by different names—then offers techniques and strategies by which we can establish that any two records do or do not apply to the same person. A variety of case studies demonstrate the problems and the methods we can use to overcome them.
Fri, May 24 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 2
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
How to Find the Truth about a Family Story
Fri, June 28 2024: 18:00 UTC
Oral history provides the foundation for all family research. Documentary evidence builds structure on that foundation. But documents often conflict with family traditions. How do we determine the core truths that are essential to understanding our own past? This class examines the causes of those conflicts and demonstrates how to peel away generations of confusion to find the real story that underpins family lore. Case studies include both Native American and African American traditions.
Oral history provides the foundation for all family research. Documentary evidence builds structure on that foundation. But documents often conflict with family traditions. How do we determine the core truths that are essential to understanding our own past? This class examines the causes of those conflicts and demonstrates how to peel away generations of confusion to find the real story that underpins family lore. Case studies include both Native American and African American traditions.
Fri, June 28 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral Genealogy in Asia-Pacific: The Essence of Personal Identity and Tribal Connections
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Finding Your Ancestors at the National SAR Genealogical Research Library
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has been collecting research material since its beginning in 1889. Not many people know that their national headquarters and award winning genealogical research library is located in Downtown Louisville Kentucky. Join us on a tour of the research facility and take a deep dive into the rare and expansive collection that awaits national researchers of all skill levels and timeline needs.
The National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution has been collecting research material since its beginning in 1889. Not many people know that their national headquarters and award winning genealogical research library is located in Downtown Louisville Kentucky. Join us on a tour of the research facility and take a deep dive into the rare and expansive collection that awaits national researchers of all skill levels and timeline needs.
Wed, July 17 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Solving a 1770 problem with the 1880 census
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Follow a case study where a 1770 brick wall was solved using the 1880 census. Learn tips and tricks to use sources creatively.
Wed, July 31 2024: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
He Had a Brother Who Disappeared: Finding John H. Hickey, Formerly of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
Prepping for and Researching at the FamilySearch Library
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC
The FamilySearch Library is the premier destination for genealogists. Researchers from around the world flock to Salt Lake City to discover and connect with their ancestors in the world’s largest genealogy library. The FamilySearch Library boasts more than 600,000 books, tens of thousands of historical maps and published pedigrees, and hundreds of workstations where visitors can access dozens of subscription sites. The best kept secret of the library is its incredible mix of volunteer and paid staff that have been specifically trained to help you in your research and how to help you take full advantage of the library’s resources. Whether you are a novice or a professional there is something for everyone at the FamilySearch Library.
The FamilySearch Library is the premier destination for genealogists. Researchers from around the world flock to Salt Lake City to discover and connect with their ancestors in the world’s largest genealogy library. The FamilySearch Library boasts more than 600,000 books, tens of thousands of historical maps and published pedigrees, and hundreds of workstations where visitors can access dozens of subscription sites. The best kept secret of the library is its incredible mix of volunteer and paid staff that have been specifically trained to help you in your research and how to help you take full advantage of the library’s resources. Whether you are a novice or a professional there is something for everyone at the FamilySearch Library.
Wed, September 4 2024: 18:00 UTC