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1:37:36
2.2K views
Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist
This session will illustrate how geography can tell you things unknown about your ancestral community and help provide a critical background for the family narrative.
This session will illustrate how geography can tell you things unknown about your ancestral community and help provide a critical background for the family narrative.
Fri, September 25 2015: 0:00 UTC
1:34:18
2.9K views
Mending Broken Ties: Reconstructing Family Trees Sawed by Slavery
All slaves had family members who were sold away or transferred to the slave-owners' heirs, never to be seen again. Many even took different surnames. It was not uncommon for two displaced brothers to retain different surnames after Emancipation. Collier will present cases of how displaced family members were found.
All slaves had family members who were sold away or transferred to the slave-owners' heirs, never to be seen again. Many even took different surnames. It was not uncommon for two displaced brothers to retain different surnames after Emancipation. Collier will present cases of how displaced family members were found.
Fri, July 31 2015: 0:00 UTC
1:14:52
6.5K views
United States Colored Troops Civil War Widows' Pension Applications: Tell the Story
Explore the challenges faced by widows and/or former slave descendants of soldiers in the United States Colored Troops Widows' Pension Applications.
Explore the challenges faced by widows and/or former slave descendants of soldiers in the United States Colored Troops Widows' Pension Applications.
Fri, April 24 2015: 0:00 UTC
1:28:29
2.2K views
Researching Ancestors in the Era of Freedom
The years right after the Civil War were critical years for all southerners white and black. Amazing records reflect that incredible time during those years. This session will explore several amazing record sets and will point to where they can be found.
The years right after the Civil War were critical years for all southerners white and black. Amazing records reflect that incredible time during those years. This session will explore several amazing record sets and will point to where they can be found.
Fri, February 20 2015: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (41)
Fri, September 30 2022: 16:45 UTC
Indirect Evidence, A Case Study: The Parents of Elizabeth Wingate in Maryland (1795–1860)
Fri, September 30 2022: 16:45 UTC
We all have lost Elizabeths in our tree. This lecture will discuss how the understanding and application of indirect evidence is such a valuable instrument in your methodology tool-kit. This case study will examine methods and sources that contributed to finding the parents of Elizabeth Wingate (1795-1860) of Baltimore, Maryland.
We all have lost Elizabeths in our tree. This lecture will discuss how the understanding and application of indirect evidence is such a valuable instrument in your methodology tool-kit. This case study will examine methods and sources that contributed to finding the parents of Elizabeth Wingate (1795-1860) of Baltimore, Maryland.
Fri, September 30 2022: 16:45 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:30 UTC
When Wrong is Actually Right: Constructing Proof Arguments for Counterintuitive Conflicts (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:30 UTC
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:30 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:45 UTC
Peeling the Onion: Getting to the Original Sources (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:45 UTC
Genealogy Standards 38 and 58 strongly express a preference for using original sources. Diligent researching and a few tricks of the trade enable genealogists to find original sources that underlie authored narratives and derivative sources.
Genealogy Standards 38 and 58 strongly express a preference for using original sources. Diligent researching and a few tricks of the trade enable genealogists to find original sources that underlie authored narratives and derivative sources.
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:45 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 18:00 UTC
The Hub of the Wheel: How Tracing a Brother with no Children Connected Ten Siblings (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 18:00 UTC
A family from Ireland emigrated in a chain migration scheme to western Pennsylvania between 1825 and 1845. See how using the standards for researching connected the siblings and their descendants and led to their origins in County Tyrone.
A family from Ireland emigrated in a chain migration scheme to western Pennsylvania between 1825 and 1845. See how using the standards for researching connected the siblings and their descendants and led to their origins in County Tyrone.
Fri, October 7 2022: 18:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:00 UTC
Consult via…Explore with…Discover through…Literature Reviews (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:00 UTC
What if you could consult with genealogical experts each time your work slows? Together you could explore options for new paths of discovery. The right approach to a literature review allows you to do that. Other experts have encountered the same challenges that you do, and they have written about them even if not overtly. These challenges could range from beginning work in a new geography to parrying with a difficult brick wall. Learn how to conduct a targeted literature review, cull the information you need, and advance your research. A case study on use of negative evidence will highlight the methodology.
What if you could consult with genealogical experts each time your work slows? Together you could explore options for new paths of discovery. The right approach to a literature review allows you to do that. Other experts have encountered the same challenges that you do, and they have written about them even if not overtly. These challenges could range from beginning work in a new geography to parrying with a difficult brick wall. Learn how to conduct a targeted literature review, cull the information you need, and advance your research. A case study on use of negative evidence will highlight the methodology.
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 21:15 UTC
Finding Henrietta: Reconciling Conflicting Evidence to Reveal a Woman’s Identity (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 21:15 UTC
Henrietta Dixon was never enumerated with individuals identified as her parents in a federal census. Records revealing her family members, including her father, are often conflicting and open up new questions. Additionally, multiple marriages further obscure her identity. This case study uncovers Henrietta’s maiden name and emphasizes the importance of a focused research question when attempting to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Henrietta Dixon was never enumerated with individuals identified as her parents in a federal census. Records revealing her family members, including her father, are often conflicting and open up new questions. Additionally, multiple marriages further obscure her identity. This case study uncovers Henrietta’s maiden name and emphasizes the importance of a focused research question when attempting to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Fri, October 7 2022: 21:15 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:30 UTC
Hidden Stories: Using Analysis to Explore the Unexpected in Family History (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:30 UTC
Tales of illegitimacy, divorce, and desertion aren’t limited to soap operas and modern reality television. Discovering trails that lead to unanticipated events can be shocking, confusing, and exciting all at the same time. This session will explore how genealogists can utilize the law, conflict resolution, and tools like date calculators and timelines to help build a clearer understanding of some potentially challenging historical situations.
Tales of illegitimacy, divorce, and desertion aren’t limited to soap operas and modern reality television. Discovering trails that lead to unanticipated events can be shocking, confusing, and exciting all at the same time. This session will explore how genealogists can utilize the law, conflict resolution, and tools like date calculators and timelines to help build a clearer understanding of some potentially challenging historical situations.
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:30 UTC
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Misled by Records: Identifying Adam Cosner’s Parentage
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Pennsylvania and Ohio records, correlated with those of a German immigrant who died in Virginia revealed Adam Cosner’s parents.
Pennsylvania and Ohio records, correlated with those of a German immigrant who died in Virginia revealed Adam Cosner’s parents.
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Thu, November 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Finding Females in US Naturalization Records, 1790-1945
Thu, November 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Whether you’re missing a naturalization record or finding an unexpected one, this session helps you discover how female ancestors – both foreign-born and birthright – gained, lost, or regained citizenship in the United States between 1790 and 1945. US citizenship and attendant rights for women could be fragile, depending on marital status, prevailing laws, social norms, and other shifting factors. Examples of US naturalization and citizenship records, and search strategies for finding these records are featured in this presentation.
Whether you’re missing a naturalization record or finding an unexpected one, this session helps you discover how female ancestors – both foreign-born and birthright – gained, lost, or regained citizenship in the United States between 1790 and 1945. US citizenship and attendant rights for women could be fragile, depending on marital status, prevailing laws, social norms, and other shifting factors. Examples of US naturalization and citizenship records, and search strategies for finding these records are featured in this presentation.
Thu, November 10 2022: 1:00 UTC