Tracing Ancestors through Revolutionary Mexico

Lisa Medina
Free

Listen to the story of Atala Apodaca Anaya and her achievements as a female revolutionary during the early 20th century, as well as those of other lesser-known figures from the Revolución Mexicana. Learn about sources and methodologies for tracing your own ancestors in revolutionary Mexico.

Fri, July 21 2023: 18:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Lisa Medina is an enthusiastic and experienced lecturer who brings together the stories and methodologies of genealogy with the effective pedagogies of a teacher in her presentations. She has experience researching in several U.S. states, as well
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