Steamer Kate Explosion: Correlating Indirect Evidence to Identify and Correct an Error

Ann Staley, CG, CGL
Free

What happens when the indirect evidence of a death occurring and a probate record don’t agree? The research begins in earnest! That’s what happened in the case of the death of Antoine/Anthony Lallament of Mobile, Alabama. Who is Antoine and what relationship is he to me? When did he actually die? Which record is correct? What would other available records reveal? How is the explosion of the Steamer Kate involved? We have more questions than answers. This case study provides the research methodology involved in solving this problem.

Wed, October 18 2023: 0:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Ann Staley, CG, CGL, is an educator, consultant, and co-leader of Ann-Mar Genealogy Trips. She is on the faculty of the National Institute for Genealogical Studies; the Education Chair of the Jacksonville Genealogical Society, Inc.; Vice President
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