Lost and Found: Locating Ancestral Origins with FAN Club and DNA

Mary Kircher Roddy, CG
Free

It’s hard to do genealogy well without studying your ancestors’ Friends & Family, Associates, and Neighbors – their FAN club. If your ancestors are Irish, you might have no luck at all without those FAN principles. But if you combine FAN club research with DNA, you might have just the winning ticket to get you back to your Irish ancestor’s origins. In this case study presentation, learn how focused research pointed the way from Ohio to townlands in County Mayo for an 1850s-era Irish immigrant.

Wed, December 18 2024: 1:00 UTC

About the speaker

About the speaker

Mary Kircher Roddy, CG became interested in family history in 2000 in anticipation of her husband’s sabbatical at the University of Limerick in Ireland. While she didn’t learn everything about her ancestors while they lived there, she was hooked!
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