Beginning Hungarian Genealogy

Lisa Toth Salinas
Sep 24, 2021
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Content

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Introduction
14m 44s
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Find the Village
10m 40s
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Naming Customs
5m 45s
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Learn the Lingo
3m 57s
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Civil Registers
13m 19s
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Religions of Hungary
10m 05s
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Jewish Ancestry
2m 38s
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Connect
9m 33s

About this webinar

The search for Hungarian roots, though often made complex by various language and border changes, can be a greatly rewarding experience. The land has long been a crossroads, and Hungarian histories and records of genealogical interest are intertwined with neighboring countries and the empires and occupiers that ruled the area over the centuries. Lisa Toth Salinas, author of the Hungarian Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™, presents an overview of the history and geography of modern day Hungary and its former lands, the types and whereabouts of available records, an introduction to the many resources available, and research strategies to aid you in a search for your Magyar roots.

About the speaker

About the speaker

LISA TOTH SALINAS is a Texas-based genealogist, poet and author of Smallest Leaf (2015), awarded the Eakin Manuscript Prize. Her research focuses on the Catholic roots of her Eastern European & Irish immigrant ancestors and their live
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  1. LS
    Linda Suveges
    1 week ago

    Thank you Lisa! This was excellent. I have been hesitant to start researching my Hungarian ancestors but this has alleviated my concerns. Great resources!

    Reply
    1
  2. BS
    Bev Sypus
    3 weeks ago

    A very wonderful and interesting presentation, thank you! I was surprised to see the name Mezo-Keresztes as Keresztes was the last name of my maternal great-grandmother when she married a second time. My great-grandmother, originally born in Hungary became Mary Keresztes when she married her second husband here in Canada. (Both of her husbands were also born in Hungary) So many interesting connections!

    Reply
    2
  3. PW
    Patricia WIlliams-Oros
    3 weeks ago

    I thought this presentation was excellent. I wish I had seen it before attempting to find my Husband’s roots. Fortunately we were able to go to Hungary & visit the village of Matramindszent, Heves, where my Father-in-law was born. He came to Canada in 1906 & did go back to Hungary for a visit in 1948, however he soon found out that Canada was the best place to live. We did find a cousin in the village but as she did not speak English so she conversed with my Husband in Hungarian & he did nor include me in the info & I had so many questions. Prior to my Father-in-law’s death, I did think to make a note of his grandparents names. I have run into a lot of the things on Birth Certificates that you mentioned & now will have fresh eyes on these documents. I like how FamilySearch.org has the transcribed information in English although I have found errors on the sex of the baby. Thank you so much for doing this presentation. Pat W-O

    Reply
    4
    1 Reply
    • JM
      Judy Mann
      3 weeks ago

      I agree with you and throughly enjoyed the presentation. I was happy to know I have been going down the correct path all these years, but also learned some new resources.

      As for FamilySearch, they now allow us to correct indexing and transcrition errors. It’s simple and easy to do and corrections make it so much easier for the next person searching for that name. I’ve corrected hundreds of errors since they introduced the feature.

      2
  4. JM
    Judy Mann
    3 weeks ago

    Fabulous presentation Lisa! Where were you 25 years ago?? Oh right, pioneering Hungarian research by yourself as I and many others were with very little if any support system. This webinar is refreshing and welcomed. Whether you’re a newbie or a seasoned researcher in Hungary, there’s a lot of practical information and resources for everyone. Lisa has summarised her years of experience beautifully in a common sense methodical manner keeping us interested at all times without being rushed. Thank you for finally putting Hungary on the map.

    On a side note, my husband, a non researcher, but has stood by me and learned much about Hungarian research by osmosis. He also has often helped me desipher many a church record, and took the time to watch the webinar as well and LOVED!

    Reply
    3
  5. MR
    Michelle Ruel
    3 weeks ago

    Great info! Do you have an advanced class? I’d love to learn more about the secondary resources! 🙂
    Thanks so much!

    Reply
    4
    1 Reply
    • JR
      Jasmin Riegler
      3 weeks ago

      Absolutly! Me too! 🙂

      4
  6. KN
    Kristine North
    3 weeks ago

    This was wonderful!! It will help me understand the records that I have now. On the ships manifest I could never understand why the word, Jozsefne was written. No I get it!

    Reply
    4
  7. NT
    Nancy Tengler
    4 weeks ago

    Wonderful introduction! You have motivated me to start work on my Attomir line, supposedly from Pecs.

    Reply
    7

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