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58:23
1.0K views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 12: Occupational Records by John Grenham
An overview of the most important occupational sources for Irish genealogy, with a large part devoted to the records of Irishmen in the British Army.
An overview of the most important occupational sources for Irish genealogy, with a large part devoted to the records of Irishmen in the British Army.
Wed, March 15 2017: 0:00 UTC
55:54
1.2K views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 11: The Valuation Office
Griffith's Valuation is the best-known 19th-century Irish census substitute. But the published Valuation itself is only the tip of the iceberg. Before publication, a huge surveying operation produced mountains of documents providing an excellent source of information on possible living relatives.
Griffith's Valuation is the best-known 19th-century Irish census substitute. But the published Valuation itself is only the tip of the iceberg. Before publication, a huge surveying operation produced mountains of documents providing an excellent source of information on possible living relatives.
Wed, March 15 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:05:42
957 views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 10: Registry of Deeds
Since 1704, the Registry of Deeds in Dublin has been providing legal registration of property transactions, often recording precious extended-family information in the process. The talk covers the nature of the transactions, the individuals involved and the main routes of access. This talk also covers the Genealogical Office.
Since 1704, the Registry of Deeds in Dublin has been providing legal registration of property transactions, often recording precious extended-family information in the process. The talk covers the nature of the transactions, the individuals involved and the main routes of access. This talk also covers the Genealogical Office.
Wed, March 15 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:06:26
851 views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 9: Wills and Directories
Both of these sources concern those with at least some property to their name, and both are now much easier to search online. The talk details relevance, locations and access, online and offline.
Both of these sources concern those with at least some property to their name, and both are now much easier to search online. The talk details relevance, locations and access, online and offline.
Wed, March 15 2017: 0:00 UTC
55:21
892 views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 8: Newspapers
The usefulness of Irish newspapers as a research tool has been completely transformed by digitization. The talk outlines the main geographic areas covered by newspapers since the 18th century and provides a guide to online access, as well as some very useful offline sources.
The usefulness of Irish newspapers as a research tool has been completely transformed by digitization. The talk outlines the main geographic areas covered by newspapers since the 18th century and provides a guide to online access, as well as some very useful offline sources.
Wed, March 15 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:03:32
1.1K views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 7: Census Substitutes
Because of the destruction of almost all 19th-century censuses in 1922, census substitutes have taken on an unnatural importance for Irish research. This talk gives an overview of records involved, moving along the spectrum from things that are census-like to strange beasts that are nothing at all like a census.
Because of the destruction of almost all 19th-century censuses in 1922, census substitutes have taken on an unnatural importance for Irish research. This talk gives an overview of records involved, moving along the spectrum from things that are census-like to strange beasts that are nothing at all like a census.
Wed, March 15 2017: 0:00 UTC
1:20:40
23.6K views
CC
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 1: The Raw Materials of Irish Genealogy
The expectations and misconceptions that can be obstacles to Irish research are discussed and debunked. Surnames and place names, the most basic raw materials of genealogy, are both especially tricky in Ireland. The reasons are analysed and online tools for handling them are introduced.
The expectations and misconceptions that can be obstacles to Irish research are discussed and debunked. Surnames and place names, the most basic raw materials of genealogy, are both especially tricky in Ireland. The reasons are analysed and online tools for handling them are introduced.
Fri, July 15 2016: 0:00 UTC
1:04:24
3.8K views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 2: The Major Records I, General Register Office
All Irish births, deaths and marriages were registered by the state from 1864. At least in theory. This talk describes how the system worked, the nature of the records it produced and the many, often confusing ways those records are now available.
All Irish births, deaths and marriages were registered by the state from 1864. At least in theory. This talk describes how the system worked, the nature of the records it produced and the many, often confusing ways those records are now available.
Fri, July 15 2016: 0:00 UTC
51:57
1.9K views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 3: The Major Records II, Censuses
This talk comprises a brief history of census-taking in Ireland. Research strategies are outlined for the earliest complete census records, 1901 and 1911, and for surviving earlier fragments. Often overlooked by the descendants of Irish emigrants because they are so late, 1901 and 1911 can provide wonderful information on collateral…
This talk comprises a brief history of census-taking in Ireland. Research strategies are outlined for the earliest complete census records, 1901 and 1911, and for surviving earlier fragments. Often overlooked by the descendants of Irish emigrants because they are so late, 1901 and 1911 can provide wonderful information on collateral…
Fri, July 15 2016: 0:00 UTC
1:05:40
2.8K views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 4: The Major Records III, Church Records
Before civil records started in 1864, Irish church records are often the only direct records of family events, and thus crucial to Irish genealogical research. This talk describes the locations and nature of the records, along with online and offline research strategies for the three major denominations, Roman Catholic, Church…
Before civil records started in 1864, Irish church records are often the only direct records of family events, and thus crucial to Irish genealogical research. This talk describes the locations and nature of the records, along with online and offline research strategies for the three major denominations, Roman Catholic, Church…
Fri, July 15 2016: 0:00 UTC
1:05:10
2.2K views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 5: The Major Records IV, Nineteenth-Century Property Records
Only two country-wide 19th-century census substitutes exist for Ireland, Griffith's Valuation (1849-1864) and the Tithe Books (1823-1838). Here they are examined them in detail and research approaches are outlined.
Only two country-wide 19th-century census substitutes exist for Ireland, Griffith's Valuation (1849-1864) and the Tithe Books (1823-1838). Here they are examined them in detail and research approaches are outlined.
Fri, July 15 2016: 0:00 UTC
48:02
1.4K views
Foundations of Irish Genealogy 6: Bringing the Major Records Together
It is one thing to know what the records are. It is another thing entirely to know how to fit those records together to extract as much genealogical information as possible. This talk concentrates on showing how the major sources interact with each other and how each can be used…
It is one thing to know what the records are. It is another thing entirely to know how to fit those records together to extract as much genealogical information as possible. This talk concentrates on showing how the major sources interact with each other and how each can be used…
Fri, July 15 2016: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

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Wed, February 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Education in Australia
Wed, February 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Tracking the movement of ancestors in Australia can be difficult without available census records. However, there are numerous record alternatives, one of which is school admission registers as children are recorded each year, with details including parent’s names and dates of entry and exit. Industrial or trade schools, universities, religious schools and others can also present information not found elsewhere.
Tracking the movement of ancestors in Australia can be difficult without available census records. However, there are numerous record alternatives, one of which is school admission registers as children are recorded each year, with details including parent’s names and dates of entry and exit. Industrial or trade schools, universities, religious schools and others can also present information not found elsewhere.
Wed, February 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Fri, February 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
The Trifecta: The Secret Sauce of Researching the Formerly Enslaved
Fri, February 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Genealogists and family historians alike have spent decades looking for a tried and true method for unearthing slaveholders of those enslaved prior to 1865. Learn how three crucial record sets (Civil War Pensions, the Freedmen’s Bureau, and Probates/Successions) can become just the wrecking ball needed to obliterate brick walls related to slavery.
Genealogists and family historians alike have spent decades looking for a tried and true method for unearthing slaveholders of those enslaved prior to 1865. Learn how three crucial record sets (Civil War Pensions, the Freedmen’s Bureau, and Probates/Successions) can become just the wrecking ball needed to obliterate brick walls related to slavery.
Fri, February 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Thu, February 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Researching in Colonial New England
Thu, February 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Researching ancestors who lived in colonial New England can be challenging. This webinar begins by tracing settlement patterns, setting the stage for understanding key records and where to find them. For the 17th century, many unique published resources exist to help the family researcher. During the colonial years, several conflicts such as King Philip’s War and the Seven Years War affected settlement and thus the surviving records. The 18th century culminated in the Revolutionary War, but also saw the continued growth of settlement and ultimately resources for the family historian.
Ann Lawthers
Researching ancestors who lived in colonial New England can be challenging. This webinar begins by tracing settlement patterns, setting the stage for understanding key records and where to find them. For the 17th century, many unique published resources exist to help the family researcher. During the colonial years, several conflicts such as King Philip’s War and the Seven Years War affected settlement and thus the surviving records. The 18th century culminated in the Revolutionary War, but also saw the continued growth of settlement and ultimately resources for the family historian.
Thu, February 10 2022: 1:00 UTC
Fri, February 18 2022: 19:00 UTC
Genealogical Gold in British Columbia
Fri, February 18 2022: 19:00 UTC
The land now known as British Columbia has been inhabited for many centuries, but most genealogical records started after the 1858 Gold Rush, which prompted many arrivals from California. Today, the province leads the rest of Canada in its commitment to making available a comprehensive collection of valuable resources. This session will enable researchers to make the most of those sources, and build a better understanding of your family’s connections to British Columbia.
The land now known as British Columbia has been inhabited for many centuries, but most genealogical records started after the 1858 Gold Rush, which prompted many arrivals from California. Today, the province leads the rest of Canada in its commitment to making available a comprehensive collection of valuable resources. This session will enable researchers to make the most of those sources, and build a better understanding of your family’s connections to British Columbia.
Fri, February 18 2022: 19:00 UTC
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Exploring the new 1921 UK Census
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
The 1921 UK Census was released earlier this year. Come explore what is new and different in this census. Learn how to search the indexed records, to understand the results, and how to take what you learn about your family further.
Wed, March 2 2022: 1:00 UTC
Fri, March 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Documenting, Organizing, and Analyzing Plantation Enslaved Persons
Fri, March 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Keeping track of hundreds of enslaved persons can be an overwhelming task. This lecture will offer suggestions for organizing and analyzing enslaved persons’ information using spreadsheets.
Keeping track of hundreds of enslaved persons can be an overwhelming task. This lecture will offer suggestions for organizing and analyzing enslaved persons’ information using spreadsheets.
Fri, March 4 2022: 19:00 UTC
Wed, March 9 2022: 19:00 UTC
‘Hidden Treasures’: Discovering Local Sources in Your Irish Research
Wed, March 9 2022: 19:00 UTC
When many start their Irish family history research they often head straight for the larger national repositories and their collections. Census records and parish registers are a great starting point for our research but don’t always help you in breaking through those brick walls. What many overlook when researching their Irish family history is the treasure trove of local repositories and the records they contain. These include street directories, cemetery registers, maps, school rolls, workhouse records and even personal family archives. The majority of Irish counties on both sides of the border have their own dedicated county library and archive which are run by local councils. This webinar will examine some of the records contained in local repositories and how best to use them for genealogical research.
When many start their Irish family history research they often head straight for the larger national repositories and their collections. Census records and parish registers are a great starting point for our research but don’t always help you in breaking through those brick walls. What many overlook when researching their Irish family history is the treasure trove of local repositories and the records they contain. These include street directories, cemetery registers, maps, school rolls, workhouse records and even personal family archives. The majority of Irish counties on both sides of the border have their own dedicated county library and archive which are run by local councils. This webinar will examine some of the records contained in local repositories and how best to use them for genealogical research.
Wed, March 9 2022: 19:00 UTC
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Identifying Unnamed Free Born African Americans – A DNA Case Study
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Identifying unnamed individuals using a Research Plan incorporating genetic evidence takes creativity and patience. This session deconstructs a case study using Genealogy Standards to align and correlate DNA results and fragmentary records for African American families, beginning in 1812 in Virginia and North Carolina.
Identifying unnamed individuals using a Research Plan incorporating genetic evidence takes creativity and patience. This session deconstructs a case study using Genealogy Standards to align and correlate DNA results and fragmentary records for African American families, beginning in 1812 in Virginia and North Carolina.
Wed, March 16 2022: 0:00 UTC
Fri, March 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Mexican Catholic Parish Records, Part II: Pre-Marital Investigations, Marriages & Dispensations
Fri, March 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
Spanish colonial and Mexican Catholic marriage records are rich in genealogical information. This session will discuss the laws, customs, and significance of pre-marital investigations, dispensations, and marriage ceremony records, as well as where to find and how to analyze them.
Spanish colonial and Mexican Catholic marriage records are rich in genealogical information. This session will discuss the laws, customs, and significance of pre-marital investigations, dispensations, and marriage ceremony records, as well as where to find and how to analyze them.
Fri, March 18 2022: 18:00 UTC