The next Best of Elizabeth Shown Mills series webinar is on Friday (a members-only event). Learn more here. Become a member here.

The next Best of Elizabeth Shown Mills series webinar is on Friday (a members-only event). Learn more here. Become a member here.

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1:12:48
922 views
Family History on the Canadian Prairies
Most Canadians have connections to the three Prairie provinces, through cousins if not through ancestors. Researching those Prairie families can be rewarding, although it is important to note which sources are common to all three provinces, and which ones are unique to each province. Using examples from Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta, this session looks at a variety of resources, and offers tips to help you learn more about your families on the Prairies.
Most Canadians have connections to the three Prairie provinces, through cousins if not through ancestors. Researching those Prairie families can be rewarding, although it is important to note which sources are common to all three provinces, and which ones are unique to each province. Using examples from Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta, this session looks at a variety of resources, and offers tips to help you learn more about your families on the Prairies.
Fri, February 17 2023: 19:00 UTC
1:18:36
599 views
CC
How the West Was Won in Canada
The Canadian west was not won by cowboys and guns. The west was won by homesteaders, NWMP (RCMP), and railways. For a $10 registration fee and a lot of hard work a male farmer could have 160 acres of land. Farmers or want-to-be-farmers came from all over. We will use a couple of case studies, search for homestead records, review all the components to understand what the records indicate, convert the data to enter and locate it on Google Maps, and view what the area looks like today. Other records such as Hudson’s Bay Company and RCMP records will be shown.
The Canadian west was not won by cowboys and guns. The west was won by homesteaders, NWMP (RCMP), and railways. For a $10 registration fee and a lot of hard work a male farmer could have 160 acres of land. Farmers or want-to-be-farmers came from all over. We will use a couple of case studies, search for homestead records, review all the components to understand what the records indicate, convert the data to enter and locate it on Google Maps, and view what the area looks like today. Other records such as Hudson’s Bay Company and RCMP records will be shown.
Fri, December 16 2022: 19:00 UTC
1:25:31
822 views
CC
Researching at the Archives of Ontario
The Archives of Ontario (AO) is the foremost repository for Ontario records. It houses all non-active provincial-level government records, many municipal-level government records, and reams of corporate, organizational and private papers. If you haven’t spent many hours at the AO, you haven’t thoroughly researched your Ontario ancestor. This class will introduce you to the AO’s MVRs (most valuable records), and show you how to use the website of the AO to identify relevant records, research historical background and find maps and images for your family history.
The Archives of Ontario (AO) is the foremost repository for Ontario records. It houses all non-active provincial-level government records, many municipal-level government records, and reams of corporate, organizational and private papers. If you haven’t spent many hours at the AO, you haven’t thoroughly researched your Ontario ancestor. This class will introduce you to the AO’s MVRs (most valuable records), and show you how to use the website of the AO to identify relevant records, research historical background and find maps and images for your family history.
Fri, October 21 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:09:25
493 views
CC
Tracing Your Alberta Connections
Alberta is unique among the 10 Canadian provinces. It was the last of the three Prairie provinces to be opened to homesteading, which meant land in that province was available just as quality homesteading land dried up in the United States. That brought a rush from south of the border, and the American influence is still felt today. There has been another mass influx of people eager to work in the energy industry. Many of the key sources used in researching your ancestors or cousins in Alberta are also unique, so local knowledge is essential. This session identifies those sources for you, and will help you get results in your searches.
Alberta is unique among the 10 Canadian provinces. It was the last of the three Prairie provinces to be opened to homesteading, which meant land in that province was available just as quality homesteading land dried up in the United States. That brought a rush from south of the border, and the American influence is still felt today. There has been another mass influx of people eager to work in the energy industry. Many of the key sources used in researching your ancestors or cousins in Alberta are also unique, so local knowledge is essential. This session identifies those sources for you, and will help you get results in your searches.
Fri, August 26 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:05:14
575 views
CC
A 19th Century Ontario Enigma – A Case Study
This is a case study based on five years worth of research into the family of Lorenzo White of Pickering, Ontario. Janice will walk the audience step by step through a very difficult research project that ultimately revealed both a fascinating story and important lessons learned. Audience members will learn about a wide range of Ontario records and strategies for overcoming seemingly impossible research roadblocks.
This is a case study based on five years worth of research into the family of Lorenzo White of Pickering, Ontario. Janice will walk the audience step by step through a very difficult research project that ultimately revealed both a fascinating story and important lessons learned. Audience members will learn about a wide range of Ontario records and strategies for overcoming seemingly impossible research roadblocks.
Fri, June 17 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:17:35
500 views
CC
Expelled from Nova Scotia: Researching the Acadian Diaspora to the Colonies
In 1750 nearly 7000 Acadian settlers of Nova Scotia were summarily rounded up, boarded onto ships and sent southward to the American Colonies. The colonies to which they were sent had little or no warning of the refugees imminent arrival. This webinar reviews the unique political and social environments of each receiving colony, the fate of the Acadians once landed, and describes where the researcher can find clues about their ancestor in the records of each colony.
Ann Lawthers
In 1750 nearly 7000 Acadian settlers of Nova Scotia were summarily rounded up, boarded onto ships and sent southward to the American Colonies. The colonies to which they were sent had little or no warning of the refugees imminent arrival. This webinar reviews the unique political and social environments of each receiving colony, the fate of the Acadians once landed, and describes where the researcher can find clues about their ancestor in the records of each colony.
Fri, April 15 2022: 18:00 UTC
51:12
96 views
CC
Through the Prairies to the Rocky Mountains: Records of Western Canada
This webinar was presented live during the 2022 Surname Society annual conference. If your family moved to Western Canada for land and open spaces, this session will help you find their records using Homestead records, genealogical societies, museums, provincial and federal archives, as well as FamilySearch and Ancestry.
This webinar was presented live during the 2022 Surname Society annual conference. If your family moved to Western Canada for land and open spaces, this session will help you find their records using Homestead records, genealogical societies, museums, provincial and federal archives, as well as FamilySearch and Ancestry.
Sat, March 19 2022: 16:00 UTC
1:11:47
480 views
CC
Genealogical Gold in British Columbia
The land now known as British Columbia has been inhabited for many centuries, but most genealogical records started after the 1858 Gold Rush, which prompted many arrivals from California. Today, the province leads the rest of Canada in its commitment to making available a comprehensive collection of valuable resources. This session will enable researchers to make the most of those sources, and build a better understanding of your family’s connections to British Columbia.
The land now known as British Columbia has been inhabited for many centuries, but most genealogical records started after the 1858 Gold Rush, which prompted many arrivals from California. Today, the province leads the rest of Canada in its commitment to making available a comprehensive collection of valuable resources. This session will enable researchers to make the most of those sources, and build a better understanding of your family’s connections to British Columbia.
Fri, February 18 2022: 19:00 UTC
1:22:47
831 views
CC
Finding Your Scottish Ancestors in Canada
Scots began coming to Canada in the mid 1600s, first as entrepreneurs – men on the make, and then as a means to an end – ways to enjoy a better life and to have the opportunity to own their own land. Others were sent to Canada in hopes of…
Scots began coming to Canada in the mid 1600s, first as entrepreneurs – men on the make, and then as a means to an end – ways to enjoy a better life and to have the opportunity to own their own land. Others were sent to Canada in hopes of…
Fri, November 19 2021: 19:00 UTC
1:16:15
2.5K views
CC
A Toboggan Ride Through Canadian Records, eh!
This session will start with websites that are for all of Canada and then go from East to West on where to find records and resources in each province and territory.
This session will start with websites that are for all of Canada and then go from East to West on where to find records and resources in each province and territory.
Fri, September 17 2021: 18:00 UTC
1:30:59
4.2K views
CC
Early Ontario Research
So you have traced your family's history back to an ancestor who lived in Ontario (or its predecessors, Canada West and Upper Canada) before civil registration. Now what? This lecture provides an overview of the six key record groups for pre-civil registration research (before 1869), what information you can expect…
So you have traced your family's history back to an ancestor who lived in Ontario (or its predecessors, Canada West and Upper Canada) before civil registration. Now what? This lecture provides an overview of the six key record groups for pre-civil registration research (before 1869), what information you can expect…
Fri, August 20 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:01:02
866 views
CC
Researching Canadian Nurses, Pilots and Sailors in the First World War
Presentations about Canadians in the First World War usually focus on the Canadian Expeditionary Force, but what about the nurses, pilots, and sailors who served? Discover what was involved in serving with the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Canadian Navy or the Nursing Sisters in the Canadian Army Medical…
Presentations about Canadians in the First World War usually focus on the Canadian Expeditionary Force, but what about the nurses, pilots, and sailors who served? Discover what was involved in serving with the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Canadian Navy or the Nursing Sisters in the Canadian Army Medical…
Fri, May 21 2021: 18:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (155)
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Looking for ‘Aliens’ Down Under: A Guide to Australian Naturalisation Records
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Following the founding of the colony of Australia, individuals born in the British Empire were considered British subjects, irrespective of the nationality of their parents. Residents of Australia whose native place was outside of the British Empire were not afforded the same rights and privileges as British subjects. These rights, in particular the right to buy land and vote, could be conferred to an individual by a process known as naturalisation. This bureaucratic process generated multiple sets of records that contain a wealth of genealogical information. This talk will outline the complex history of naturalisation in Australia, the changing terminology used, how, when and why naturalisation records were created, and discuss the likely availability of records and for whom they may have been created.
Kristy Love
Following the founding of the colony of Australia, individuals born in the British Empire were considered British subjects, irrespective of the nationality of their parents. Residents of Australia whose native place was outside of the British Empire were not afforded the same rights and privileges as British subjects. These rights, in particular the right to buy land and vote, could be conferred to an individual by a process known as naturalisation. This bureaucratic process generated multiple sets of records that contain a wealth of genealogical information. This talk will outline the complex history of naturalisation in Australia, the changing terminology used, how, when and why naturalisation records were created, and discuss the likely availability of records and for whom they may have been created.
Wed, April 5 2023: 2:00 UTC
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
Tick Marks and Number Counts: Understanding and Using the Slave Schedules
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
What exactly are the 1850 and 1860 United States Slave Schedules and what is their value to researchers? A closer look at this enumeration of “slave inhabitants” will streamline interpretation of these records and will help define the do’s and don’ts of working with them.
What exactly are the 1850 and 1860 United States Slave Schedules and what is their value to researchers? A closer look at this enumeration of “slave inhabitants” will streamline interpretation of these records and will help define the do’s and don’ts of working with them.
Fri, April 7 2023: 18:00 UTC
Thu, April 13 2023: 22:00 UTC
Spanish & Latin American Records on MyHeritage
Thu, April 13 2023: 22:00 UTC
Researching Hispanic and/or Latino ancestors? Daniel Horowitz will introduce you to the wealth of historical collections from Spain and Latin America on offer at MyHeritage and give you important pointers for searching and analyzing them.
Researching Hispanic and/or Latino ancestors? Daniel Horowitz will introduce you to the wealth of historical collections from Spain and Latin America on offer at MyHeritage and give you important pointers for searching and analyzing them.
Thu, April 13 2023: 22:00 UTC
Thu, April 13 2023: 23:00 UTC
Liverpool: The Central Hub for Northern Europe’s 19th and 20th Century Emigration
Thu, April 13 2023: 23:00 UTC
Regular sailing schedules between Liverpool and North America began in 1818, and during the 19th century Liverpool became the primary port for emigrants from the British Isles, northern Europe and Russia to North America, Australia, and the rest of the British Empire. Learn how and why this came about, understand what the experience was like going to, in, and leaving from Liverpool. Learn how to identify, access, and use the records of the port and shipping that are available.
Regular sailing schedules between Liverpool and North America began in 1818, and during the 19th century Liverpool became the primary port for emigrants from the British Isles, northern Europe and Russia to North America, Australia, and the rest of the British Empire. Learn how and why this came about, understand what the experience was like going to, in, and leaving from Liverpool. Learn how to identify, access, and use the records of the port and shipping that are available.
Thu, April 13 2023: 23:00 UTC
Fri, April 14 2023: 1:00 UTC
The FAN Club Methodology, DNA, and Genealogy Lead Back to Lunatic’s Plantation
Fri, April 14 2023: 1:00 UTC
Utilizing the FAN Club method, DNA, and enslaved ancestral research, Collier finally found major clues to help solve a longtime mystery – who was the previous enslaver of his great-great grandmother, Polly Partee of Panola County, Mississippi, and where did she come from? Her last enslaver was Squire Boone Partee of Panola County, and Polly had been the head cook on his plantation during and after slavery, according to oral history. According to the censuses, she was born somewhere in North Carolina and sold to Squire by 1852, but her origins had been largely unknown. Collier will present a plethora of DNA evidence, in conjunction with genealogy research and the FAN Club methodology, to uncover Polly’s North Carolina origins. Collier will also argue how a court-investigated lunatic, Alfred Alston of Fayette County, Tennessee, was most likely her previous enslaver.
Utilizing the FAN Club method, DNA, and enslaved ancestral research, Collier finally found major clues to help solve a longtime mystery – who was the previous enslaver of his great-great grandmother, Polly Partee of Panola County, Mississippi, and where did she come from? Her last enslaver was Squire Boone Partee of Panola County, and Polly had been the head cook on his plantation during and after slavery, according to oral history. According to the censuses, she was born somewhere in North Carolina and sold to Squire by 1852, but her origins had been largely unknown. Collier will present a plethora of DNA evidence, in conjunction with genealogy research and the FAN Club methodology, to uncover Polly’s North Carolina origins. Collier will also argue how a court-investigated lunatic, Alfred Alston of Fayette County, Tennessee, was most likely her previous enslaver.
Fri, April 14 2023: 1:00 UTC
Fri, April 14 2023: 6:00 UTC
Polish cemeteries online
Fri, April 14 2023: 6:00 UTC
The presentation will cover Polish cemetery online databases – portals and websites that include information about burials from all over Poland. Kinga will show you how to use these and explain what is the most common information that you may find there.
The presentation will cover Polish cemetery online databases – portals and websites that include information about burials from all over Poland. Kinga will show you how to use these and explain what is the most common information that you may find there.
Fri, April 14 2023: 6:00 UTC
Fri, April 14 2023: 8:00 UTC
To Have but No Longer to Hold: Divorce in Australia
Fri, April 14 2023: 8:00 UTC
The first colony to introduce divorce was South Australia in 1858 to the last New South Wales in 1873. The requirements differed by colony. Each colony handled its own divorces until the Federal Matrimonial Causes Act 1959 provided 14 grounds for the grant of divorce, including adultery, desertion, cruelty, habitual drunkenness, imprisonment and insanity. To succeed on one of these grounds, a spouse had to prove marital fault. There was only one no-fault ground: separation for more than five years. It was not until the Family Law Act 1975 was passed by the Federal Parliament that a “no fault divorce” existed in Australia: imprisonment and insanity. To succeed on one of these grounds, a spouse had to prove marital fault. There was only one no-fault ground: separation for more than five years.
The first colony to introduce divorce was South Australia in 1858 to the last New South Wales in 1873. The requirements differed by colony. Each colony handled its own divorces until the Federal Matrimonial Causes Act 1959 provided 14 grounds for the grant of divorce, including adultery, desertion, cruelty, habitual drunkenness, imprisonment and insanity. To succeed on one of these grounds, a spouse had to prove marital fault. There was only one no-fault ground: separation for more than five years. It was not until the Family Law Act 1975 was passed by the Federal Parliament that a “no fault divorce” existed in Australia: imprisonment and insanity. To succeed on one of these grounds, a spouse had to prove marital fault. There was only one no-fault ground: separation for more than five years.
Fri, April 14 2023: 8:00 UTC
Fri, April 14 2023: 9:00 UTC
Australian indexes online for family history research you might not know
Fri, April 14 2023: 9:00 UTC
This class examines online indexes that are not available through the big subscription sites. Family history societies and volunteer groups have created unique resources only available through their websites. Often free to use or more details are included in a society membership.
Shauna Hicks
This class examines online indexes that are not available through the big subscription sites. Family history societies and volunteer groups have created unique resources only available through their websites. Often free to use or more details are included in a society membership.
Fri, April 14 2023: 9:00 UTC
Fri, April 14 2023: 10:00 UTC
Different calendars in German genealogy
Fri, April 14 2023: 10:00 UTC
Only since 1893, there is one time zone in Germany! However, in the sources relevant for genealogy there are also dates referring to the Julian and Gregorian calendars, as well as the French revolutionary calendar and the church calendar. Here the differences and conversion to today’s dates are explained.
Only since 1893, there is one time zone in Germany! However, in the sources relevant for genealogy there are also dates referring to the Julian and Gregorian calendars, as well as the French revolutionary calendar and the church calendar. Here the differences and conversion to today’s dates are explained.
Fri, April 14 2023: 10:00 UTC