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1:29:38
14.6K views
CC
Do You Have an Artificial Brick Wall?
Genealogists are famous for their brick walls. However, many of the things we call “brick walls” are more likely the result of some common errors, such as relying too heavily on the Internet, not reviewing original sources and focusing too closely on only the person or couple of interest. These…
Genealogists are famous for their brick walls. However, many of the things we call “brick walls” are more likely the result of some common errors, such as relying too heavily on the Internet, not reviewing original sources and focusing too closely on only the person or couple of interest. These…
Wed, January 13 2021: 1:00 UTC
43:56
6.2K views
CC
Successful Collateral and Cluster Searches
Learn why researching those in-laws, “shirt-tail cousins” and others who may not be a direct-line ancestor as well as “friends, neighbors and associates” can help you break down your genealogy research brick walls.
Learn why researching those in-laws, “shirt-tail cousins” and others who may not be a direct-line ancestor as well as “friends, neighbors and associates” can help you break down your genealogy research brick walls.
Fri, September 6 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:19:28
18.4K views
CC
How I Built My Own Brick Wall
We identify ways that researchers have built their own "brick wall" through inexperience, lack of organization, and incorrect assumptions. We discuss how to resolve these issues and the speaker will share her own growing pains as a budding genealogist.
We identify ways that researchers have built their own "brick wall" through inexperience, lack of organization, and incorrect assumptions. We discuss how to resolve these issues and the speaker will share her own growing pains as a budding genealogist.
Fri, April 26 2019: 0:00 UTC
1:31:17
4.4K views
Overcoming Brick Walls Caused by Record Loss
Many records have been lost due to climate, poor storage, and war. Often it is possible to find alternative records if you know where to look. Federal records such as the census, and cemetery records both local and national are just two of the many record types to check to…
Many records have been lost due to climate, poor storage, and war. Often it is possible to find alternative records if you know where to look. Federal records such as the census, and cemetery records both local and national are just two of the many record types to check to…
Wed, March 7 2018: 0:00 UTC
1:47:26
5.7K views
Becoming a Genealogy Detective
Chances are, if you have spent any time at all working to compile your family history, you have run into difficulty finding at least one elusive relative & maybe even several of them! Within the genealogy community this experience is commonly referred to as a 'brick wall'. Some of brick…
Chances are, if you have spent any time at all working to compile your family history, you have run into difficulty finding at least one elusive relative & maybe even several of them! Within the genealogy community this experience is commonly referred to as a 'brick wall'. Some of brick…
Wed, December 7 2016: 0:00 UTC
1:57:33
6.8K views
CC
Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings – Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research
Your brick wall is giving you countless headaches and troubles. Perhaps it's time to take a fresh look at different people in your family tree. In this webinar we will talk about doing in-depth research on cousins and siblings in order to remove genealogy obstacles.
Your brick wall is giving you countless headaches and troubles. Perhaps it's time to take a fresh look at different people in your family tree. In this webinar we will talk about doing in-depth research on cousins and siblings in order to remove genealogy obstacles.
Wed, December 16 2015: 0:00 UTC
1:25:00
5.4K views
Brick Walls: Cracking the Case of Nathan Brown's Parents
Join Marian Pierre-Louis as she cracks the long-standing brick wall surrounding Nathan Brown's parents (Geoff Rasmussen's brick wall). Marian will share the analysis process she used to find Nathan's parents. Certain techniques, which you can apply to your own research, can be used to unravel difficult genealogical problems. Follow that…
Join Marian Pierre-Louis as she cracks the long-standing brick wall surrounding Nathan Brown's parents (Geoff Rasmussen's brick wall). Marian will share the analysis process she used to find Nathan's parents. Certain techniques, which you can apply to your own research, can be used to unravel difficult genealogical problems. Follow that…
Wed, November 2 2011: 0:00 UTC

Upcoming Live Webinars

View all (78)
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Documents + DNA + Method + a little bit of Luck: Combining Tools to Find Biological Family
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Finding an adopted child’s biological family is especially challenging for genealogists. This presentation list the steps one can take to identify an unknown parent or grandparent and dissects a successful case to show how good methodology combined with document research and DNA matches can put a decades-old question to rest.
Finding an adopted child’s biological family is especially challenging for genealogists. This presentation list the steps one can take to identify an unknown parent or grandparent and dissects a successful case to show how good methodology combined with document research and DNA matches can put a decades-old question to rest.
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
Negative Evidence: Making Something Out of Nothing
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
When is not finding a record nothing, and when does it signify something? Information that is not where you expect it to be may yield important evidence for your research question. Understanding the purpose of a source — who and what it records, and why — will help you determine if the missing person or event is negative evidence or merely a negative search. A series of examples demonstrate methodologies used to create something out of nothing.
When is not finding a record nothing, and when does it signify something? Information that is not where you expect it to be may yield important evidence for your research question. Understanding the purpose of a source — who and what it records, and why — will help you determine if the missing person or event is negative evidence or merely a negative search. A series of examples demonstrate methodologies used to create something out of nothing.
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
A Deep Dive into the Map Collections of the Library of Congress
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
The library holds the world’s largest collection of maps—over 5.2 million maps according to their website. This webinar will describe the collections most valuable for genealogical research. We are going to explore the online resources and how they can help our research. Exploring the phenomenal learning resources is also on the agenda. We will also talk about finding aids, research guides, reproduction capabilities, and alternative ways to access the map collections. Lastly, we will discuss the resources that are only available onsite, such as the cartographic library, cartographic exhibits, and other unique holdings.
Wed, June 29 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Ancestors’ Religions in the U.S.
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Religious records are essential in genealogy research. Do you know all ancestors’ religions? Review the Protestant Reformation and religions in the U.S. Find your ancestor.
Religious records are essential in genealogy research. Do you know all ancestors’ religions? Review the Protestant Reformation and religions in the U.S. Find your ancestor.
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Finding Fayette’s Father: Autosomal DNA Reveals Misattributed Parentage
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Traditional documentation clearly identified Fayette’s father without conflict. However, the DNA results of Fayette’s descendants told a different story. Learn how DNA evidence combined with a trail of clues and the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard revealed a secret from the summer of 1913.
Traditional documentation clearly identified Fayette’s father without conflict. However, the DNA results of Fayette’s descendants told a different story. Learn how DNA evidence combined with a trail of clues and the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard revealed a secret from the summer of 1913.
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Abstracting Documents: An Essential Skill for All Genealogists
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Every document that is used during genealogical research must be thoroughly and accurately analyzed. Abstracting is a fundamental part of this research and analyzing process. Yet many genealogists are not confident in their ability to perform this task effectively and efficiently. This causes researchers to avoid the abstracting process resulting in research errors. An abstract is a summary of all the important details in a document. This presentation will examine the abstracting process by using examples that show how to abstract a variety of documents, general guidelines for abstracting, what to include and what to eliminate when creating an abstract, and lastly will explore some problems that might be encountered while abstracting.
Every document that is used during genealogical research must be thoroughly and accurately analyzed. Abstracting is a fundamental part of this research and analyzing process. Yet many genealogists are not confident in their ability to perform this task effectively and efficiently. This causes researchers to avoid the abstracting process resulting in research errors. An abstract is a summary of all the important details in a document. This presentation will examine the abstracting process by using examples that show how to abstract a variety of documents, general guidelines for abstracting, what to include and what to eliminate when creating an abstract, and lastly will explore some problems that might be encountered while abstracting.
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC
When Wrong is Actually Right: Constructing Proof Arguments for Counterintuitive Conflicts (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:15 UTC
Peeling the Onion: Getting to the Original Sources (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:15 UTC
Genealogy Standards 38 and 58 strongly express a preference for using original sources. Diligent researching and a few tricks of the trade enable genealogists to find original sources that underlie authored narratives and derivative sources.
Genealogy Standards 38 and 58 strongly express a preference for using original sources. Diligent researching and a few tricks of the trade enable genealogists to find original sources that underlie authored narratives and derivative sources.
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:15 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 17:30 UTC
The Hub of the Wheel: How Tracing a Brother with no Children Connected Ten Siblings (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 17:30 UTC
A family from Ireland emigrated in a chain migration scheme to western Pennsylvania between 1825 and 1845. See how using the standards for researching connected the siblings and their descendants and led to their origins in County Tyrone.
A family from Ireland emigrated in a chain migration scheme to western Pennsylvania between 1825 and 1845. See how using the standards for researching connected the siblings and their descendants and led to their origins in County Tyrone.
Fri, October 7 2022: 17:30 UTC