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Watch webinars that focus on specific record categories including adoption, vital records, cemetery records, census records, city directories, immigration records, newspapers and more for locations around the world.

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Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
African Americans Heading West
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
After the end of the Civil War in 1865, African Americans began leaving the areas where they had been enslaved. Many went to North to larger towns where work was more plentiful. But less discussed is that a number went West to farm, using the Homestead Act of 1862 to claim land of their own. Other settled in and helped develop some all-Black towns in Kansas and Oklahoma. Still others headed to the Pacific Coast for work. What can we find out about these settlers’ lives? Where can we find records?
After the end of the Civil War in 1865, African Americans began leaving the areas where they had been enslaved. Many went to North to larger towns where work was more plentiful. But less discussed is that a number went West to farm, using the Homestead Act of 1862 to claim land of their own. Other settled in and helped develop some all-Black towns in Kansas and Oklahoma. Still others headed to the Pacific Coast for work. What can we find out about these settlers’ lives? Where can we find records?
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, August 31 2022: 18:00 UTC
Direct Your Letters to San Jose: Following Ancestors’ Migration Trails
Wed, August 31 2022: 18:00 UTC
U.S. Migration patterns trended from the east to west coasts as Manifest Destiny played out in our American ancestors’ lives. Did they write letters? Yes, they did. Did they keep a diary? Likely. But, have those documents survived, and if so where might they be located? Follow through historical documents the 100+year Westward Migration of one family who created, saved, and handed down pertinent historical documents pinpointing their migration from Kentucky to Illinois in the early 1830s, chronicled an overland journey to the California Gold Rush 20 years later in 1850, then later emigrated from Illinois to Kansas in the early days of the Civil War. Discover what brought one descendant to Kansas City, Missouri, after World War II. Where’s their next stop? This case study is studded with potential research avenues for any genealogist, anthropologist, archivist, cartographer, or automobile enthusiast.
U.S. Migration patterns trended from the east to west coasts as Manifest Destiny played out in our American ancestors’ lives. Did they write letters? Yes, they did. Did they keep a diary? Likely. But, have those documents survived, and if so where might they be located? Follow through historical documents the 100+year Westward Migration of one family who created, saved, and handed down pertinent historical documents pinpointing their migration from Kentucky to Illinois in the early 1830s, chronicled an overland journey to the California Gold Rush 20 years later in 1850, then later emigrated from Illinois to Kansas in the early days of the Civil War. Discover what brought one descendant to Kansas City, Missouri, after World War II. Where’s their next stop? This case study is studded with potential research avenues for any genealogist, anthropologist, archivist, cartographer, or automobile enthusiast.
Wed, August 31 2022: 18:00 UTC
Wed, October 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Colonial Migrations to 1770
Wed, October 19 2022: 18:00 UTC
Before the Revolutionary War, geography, topography and a strong indigenous people presence shaped migration patterns. This webinar covers the dominant push-pull forces and challenges for colonial migration. Using maps and other graphics, the major migration routes by region will be described: New England, mid-Atlantic and southward from Virginia. Famous paths such as the Kings Highway, the Great Valley Road, and the Fall Line Road as well as less well-known paths such as the Greenwood Path and the Forbidden Path will be covered. Using a set of case studies, the process of locating clues in local histories, land records, and vital records is unfolded.
Ann Lawthers
Before the Revolutionary War, geography, topography and a strong indigenous people presence shaped migration patterns. This webinar covers the dominant push-pull forces and challenges for colonial migration. Using maps and other graphics, the major migration routes by region will be described: New England, mid-Atlantic and southward from Virginia. Famous paths such as the Kings Highway, the Great Valley Road, and the Fall Line Road as well as less well-known paths such as the Greenwood Path and the Forbidden Path will be covered. Using a set of case studies, the process of locating clues in local histories, land records, and vital records is unfolded.
Wed, October 19 2022: 18:00 UTC

Featured Webinars

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8:00
51 views
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How a City Directory worked for me again
Following up on his recent case study webinar, “How I Debunked an Online Tree Hint”, Geoff Rasmussen shows how a city directory put a final nail in that hint’s coffin (not sure how great that analogy is, but hopefully you get the point…) and provided new clues to continue his research.
Following up on his recent case study webinar, “How I Debunked an Online Tree Hint”, Geoff Rasmussen shows how a city directory put a final nail in that hint’s coffin (not sure how great that analogy is, but hopefully you get the point…) and provided new clues to continue his research.
Thu, June 30 2022: 0:00 UTC
40:18
276 views
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Born to be Filed: Delayed Birth Records in the U.S.
Delayed birth records for U.S. adults came into their own between the 1930s and 1950s. Follow with me the fascinating evolution of these records via nationwide newspaper coverage during that time. Explore examples that will make you want to look for your relatives’ delayed birth records–and get some tips for how to find them.
Delayed birth records for U.S. adults came into their own between the 1930s and 1950s. Follow with me the fascinating evolution of these records via nationwide newspaper coverage during that time. Explore examples that will make you want to look for your relatives’ delayed birth records–and get some tips for how to find them.
Fri, June 24 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:33:11
1.3K views
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Irish Emigration to North America: Before, during and after Famine
Identify push factors to emigration (internal issues influencing emigration): Identify pull factors to emigration (external forces encouraging emigration) • Discuss factors and resources for each time period • Emigration pre-1717 • Scots-Irish (1717 – 1783) • Revolutionary War to the Famine (1783-1845) • Famine years and after • How to use to find places of origin
Identify push factors to emigration (internal issues influencing emigration): Identify pull factors to emigration (external forces encouraging emigration) • Discuss factors and resources for each time period • Emigration pre-1717 • Scots-Irish (1717 – 1783) • Revolutionary War to the Famine (1783-1845) • Famine years and after • How to use to find places of origin
Wed, June 22 2022: 18:00 UTC
57:55
364 views
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Studying Free People of Color in Apprentice Records
This lecture will discuss the institution of apprenticeship – documents, laws, and resources relating to free people of color before the Civil War.
This lecture will discuss the institution of apprenticeship – documents, laws, and resources relating to free people of color before the Civil War.
Fri, June 3 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:09:13
157 views
French
Free
1939-1945, parcours de prisonniers de guerre
Quand un généalogiste se lance dans des recherches sur un combattant français de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, il est souvent amené à travailler sur un profil de prisonnier de guerre. C’est presque une affaire de statistiques, avec plus de 1,8 million de soldats capturés par les forces allemandes entre mai et juin 1940 ! La recherche prend alors une tournure particulière. Ce moment de la vie du combattant stimule la curiosité de son descendant. Et, ce qui n’est pas le moindre paradoxe, le généalogiste a parfois connu l’ancien prisonnier de guerre. Il a écouté les récits de son père, de son grand-père, il en a collecté les anecdotes. Mais une fois que le principal témoin a disparu, il se rend compte qu’il lui manque des données précises pour documenter cette histoire individuelle transmise dans l’intimité familiale. Heureusement les archives existent. Elles permettent de compléter les précieux souvenirs. Ce webinaire a pour but de recenser les sources, qui sont variées. Et, à partir de cet inventaire, il s’agira d’envisager les méthodes de recherche, et les conditions de consultation, en fonction des configurations.
Quand un généalogiste se lance dans des recherches sur un combattant français de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, il est souvent amené à travailler sur un profil de prisonnier de guerre. C’est presque une affaire de statistiques, avec plus de 1,8 million de soldats capturés par les forces allemandes entre mai et juin 1940 ! La recherche prend alors une tournure particulière. Ce moment de la vie du combattant stimule la curiosité de son descendant. Et, ce qui n’est pas le moindre paradoxe, le généalogiste a parfois connu l’ancien prisonnier de guerre. Il a écouté les récits de son père, de son grand-père, il en a collecté les anecdotes. Mais une fois que le principal témoin a disparu, il se rend compte qu’il lui manque des données précises pour documenter cette histoire individuelle transmise dans l’intimité familiale. Heureusement les archives existent. Elles permettent de compléter les précieux souvenirs. Ce webinaire a pour but de recenser les sources, qui sont variées. Et, à partir de cet inventaire, il s’agira d’envisager les méthodes de recherche, et les conditions de consultation, en fonction des configurations.
Tue, May 31 2022: 11:00 UTC
1:09:06
The Voyages of Our German Immigrants
Germans began immigrating to the United States in 1683, according to documented history. This talk will highlight significant aspects of the first four major waves of migration, through 1910. The areas from which they came and motivations that typified each wave will be detailed. Available immigration and emigration records help tell the immigrant’s story. Laws changed over time and impacted various aspects of the immigration experience.
Germans began immigrating to the United States in 1683, according to documented history. This talk will highlight significant aspects of the first four major waves of migration, through 1910. The areas from which they came and motivations that typified each wave will be detailed. Available immigration and emigration records help tell the immigrant’s story. Laws changed over time and impacted various aspects of the immigration experience.
Fri, May 27 2022: 22:57 UTC
44:33
657 views
CC
Free
Jump-starting Your 1950 Census Research with Census Helper™
Ready to explore the newly released 1950 U.S. Census records? MyHeritage’s free Census Helper™ tool is the perfect place to start. Uri Gonen, SVP Product Manager at MyHeritage, will introduce you to this handy tool he developed and show you how to use it to organize and focus your census research.
Ready to explore the newly released 1950 U.S. Census records? MyHeritage’s free Census Helper™ tool is the perfect place to start. Uri Gonen, SVP Product Manager at MyHeritage, will introduce you to this handy tool he developed and show you how to use it to organize and focus your census research.
Tue, May 24 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:21:02
Five Wives & A Feather Bed: Using Indirect and Negative Evidence to Resolve Conflicting Claims
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:20:49
486 views
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McMasters’ Will: The Scheme That Made Us Virtually Free
Calvin Dark presents the story of his Great-Great Grandfather, Aaron McMasters, born enslaved around 1814 in North Carolina. When he was 20 years old, he convinced his master and biological father, Simeon McMasters, to free him but North Carolina law wouldn’t allow it. This presentation will shed light on aspects of slavery (including manumission, emancipation, anti-slavery vs. abolitionist groups, Underground Railroad, Quakers, and Black Codes), Reconstruction, and African American history in North Carolina that are lesser-known and largely omitted from mainstream teaching and discourse about the period. The presentation will also provide tips and lessons learned for using genetic genealogy to uncover and discover valuable family history.
Calvin Dark presents the story of his Great-Great Grandfather, Aaron McMasters, born enslaved around 1814 in North Carolina. When he was 20 years old, he convinced his master and biological father, Simeon McMasters, to free him but North Carolina law wouldn’t allow it. This presentation will shed light on aspects of slavery (including manumission, emancipation, anti-slavery vs. abolitionist groups, Underground Railroad, Quakers, and Black Codes), Reconstruction, and African American history in North Carolina that are lesser-known and largely omitted from mainstream teaching and discourse about the period. The presentation will also provide tips and lessons learned for using genetic genealogy to uncover and discover valuable family history.
Fri, May 6 2022: 18:00 UTC