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French
Free
Comment suivre un ancêtre huguenot hors de France après 1685
Si vous avez des ancêtres protestants, vous devez déjà avoir eu bien des difficultés à retrouver les actes les concernant lors de la période dite du « Désert » après 1685. Mais avez-vous déjà cherché si un membre de la famille avait pris le chemin de l’exil et rejoint un…
Si vous avez des ancêtres protestants, vous devez déjà avoir eu bien des difficultés à retrouver les actes les concernant lors de la période dite du « Désert » après 1685. Mais avez-vous déjà cherché si un membre de la famille avait pris le chemin de l’exil et rejoint un…
Sun, November 28 2021: 13:00 UTC
56:19
7 views
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Getting the Most out of the Irish Census
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
The National Census were undertaken in Ireland every ten years from 1821 although many only have fragments remaining. The webinar will examine what remains for those years where only fragments exist and look at examples that help to build a family tree, along with the differences in the information gathered. We’ll examine the different type of returns for the Census of 1901 and 1911, such as for lunatic asylums, army barracks and prisons and examples of each of these will be shown. These records can be difficult to pin down and we will cover practical tips to help you find them. The different census forms provided interesting additional background information about the type of home and outbuildings a householder had and help to build a picture of their lives. Tips on search techniques will help to ensure you can find your ancestor and we’ll look at why you might struggle to find them or their place of residence in the census. Census Search Forms are a useful census substitute for the 1841 and 1851 Census records that were used when applying for the Old Age Pension and we will look at different examples that can expand your family tree.
Sat, November 27 2021: 0:00 UTC
45:19
5 views
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I want my mummy: Researching Egyptian family history
When we think of Egyptians, most of us would conjure up images of Tutankamun and Cleopatra. The nine year old boy king Tutankamun, who died as a teenager, ruled from 1333 to 1323 BC. The discovery of his largely intact tomb in 1922 is considered one of the most significant archaeological discoveries in the modern era, and the contents of his tomb are more significant than his short reign. Queen Cleopatra, born 69BC, who ruled Egypt from 51 to 30 BC, was the last ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty. She is famous for her beauty and her love triangle with the Roman warlords Julius Caesar and Mark Antony (not her twenty year reign). ‘Cleopatra,’ played by the white, blue eyed, black haired Elizabeth Taylor, (not an African woman) is a 1963 five hour film, depicting Cleopatra\’s relationships with Caesar and Antony in an ill-fated attempt to save the Egyptian empire. However, this images are from ancient Egypt. Many children will have dressed up for the day in a bedsheet and a hair towel, when looking at Egypt in school. For many people, the first time they will see a dead body is when they visit a museum and see an Egyptian Mummy. However, these aren’t ‘mummies’ – they are people, whose bodies underwent a mummification process. And is it ok that these bodies have been removed from their burial places and unceremoniously placed in glass cabinets and exposed for all to see, very distant from their countries? So how do Egyptians today mark births, marriages and deaths? This session will look at how Egyptian people today register births, celebrate marriages and register and bury their dead. The roles of religion and bureaucracy will be explained. What are the traditional naming systems in place? Do women change their surname when they marry? Examples of Egyptian family trees will be given, which reveal that women aren’t placed on family trees. What do DNA testing companies reveal about Egyptian DNA?
When we think of Egyptians, most of us would conjure up images of Tutankamun and Cleopatra. The nine year old boy king Tutankamun, who died as a teenager, ruled from 1333 to 1323 BC. The discovery of his largely intact tomb in 1922 is considered one of the most significant archaeological discoveries in the modern era, and the contents of his tomb are more significant than his short reign. Queen Cleopatra, born 69BC, who ruled Egypt from 51 to 30 BC, was the last ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty. She is famous for her beauty and her love triangle with the Roman warlords Julius Caesar and Mark Antony (not her twenty year reign). ‘Cleopatra,’ played by the white, blue eyed, black haired Elizabeth Taylor, (not an African woman) is a 1963 five hour film, depicting Cleopatra\’s relationships with Caesar and Antony in an ill-fated attempt to save the Egyptian empire. However, this images are from ancient Egypt. Many children will have dressed up for the day in a bedsheet and a hair towel, when looking at Egypt in school. For many people, the first time they will see a dead body is when they visit a museum and see an Egyptian Mummy. However, these aren’t ‘mummies’ – they are people, whose bodies underwent a mummification process. And is it ok that these bodies have been removed from their burial places and unceremoniously placed in glass cabinets and exposed for all to see, very distant from their countries? So how do Egyptians today mark births, marriages and deaths? This session will look at how Egyptian people today register births, celebrate marriages and register and bury their dead. The roles of religion and bureaucracy will be explained. What are the traditional naming systems in place? Do women change their surname when they marry? Examples of Egyptian family trees will be given, which reveal that women aren’t placed on family trees. What do DNA testing companies reveal about Egyptian DNA?
Fri, November 26 2021: 0:00 UTC
1:22:47
712 views
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Finding Your Scottish Ancestors in Canada
Scots began coming to Canada in the mid 1600s, first as entrepreneurs – men on the make, and then as a means to an end – ways to enjoy a better life and to have the opportunity to own their own land. Others were sent to Canada in hopes of…
Scots began coming to Canada in the mid 1600s, first as entrepreneurs – men on the make, and then as a means to an end – ways to enjoy a better life and to have the opportunity to own their own land. Others were sent to Canada in hopes of…
Fri, November 19 2021: 19:00 UTC
1:19:50
446 views
CC
Court Records for People of Color Family History Research
What’s the difference between circuit and chancery court? Are probate and succession the same thing? Why bother looking at court records when it’s not involving slavery? Get the answers to these questions and more during this session, where we’ll cover court records from top to bottom, from the perspective of…
What’s the difference between circuit and chancery court? Are probate and succession the same thing? Why bother looking at court records when it’s not involving slavery? Get the answers to these questions and more during this session, where we’ll cover court records from top to bottom, from the perspective of…
Fri, November 12 2021: 19:00 UTC
55:37
405 views
CC
The Two Colonial Georgias
Understanding the history of a state will help you find genealogical records when searching before they became a state and to recognize names and places in their research. Georgia operated under two different government structures before the Revolutionary War and was the only state that stayed mostly under the control…
Understanding the history of a state will help you find genealogical records when searching before they became a state and to recognize names and places in their research. Georgia operated under two different government structures before the Revolutionary War and was the only state that stayed mostly under the control…
Thu, November 11 2021: 1:00 UTC
1:13:56
612 views
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Free
An overview of the massive new record collection from France
With a newly added collection of 463 million Historical Records from France, MyHeritage is an incredible resource to search for your French roots. This session will provide an overview of these collections and highlight how to search them in MyHeritage’s historical record search engine.
With a newly added collection of 463 million Historical Records from France, MyHeritage is an incredible resource to search for your French roots. This session will provide an overview of these collections and highlight how to search them in MyHeritage’s historical record search engine.
Tue, November 9 2021: 19:00 UTC
1:25:44
461 views
CC
Say Amen: Going to Church with the Master – Finding the Mother Church
Pre-civil war churches show the relationship between Masters and their slaves. Enslaved people attended Church with their owners and they were recorded beside their owners. Some of the enslaved individuals even got married in their Master’s church. This lecture will show you how to identify the Mother’s church and to…
Pre-civil war churches show the relationship between Masters and their slaves. Enslaved people attended Church with their owners and they were recorded beside their owners. Some of the enslaved individuals even got married in their Master’s church. This lecture will show you how to identify the Mother’s church and to…
Fri, November 5 2021: 18:00 UTC
1:15:29
895 views
CC
Uncovering the lives of your London (England) ancestors
It can be quite daunting to find your ancestors who lived in the Greater London area as records are held at numerous archives. Parishes number in the hundreds and surprisingly, many Londoners in the 18th and 19th centuries were quite mobile. This presentation will take you through a variety of…
It can be quite daunting to find your ancestors who lived in the Greater London area as records are held at numerous archives. Parishes number in the hundreds and surprisingly, many Londoners in the 18th and 19th centuries were quite mobile. This presentation will take you through a variety of…
Wed, November 3 2021: 1:00 UTC