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Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Ancestors’ Religions in the U.S.
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Religious records are essential in genealogy research. Do you know all ancestors’ religions? Review the Protestant Reformation and religions in the U.S. Find your ancestor.
Religious records are essential in genealogy research. Do you know all ancestors’ religions? Review the Protestant Reformation and religions in the U.S. Find your ancestor.
Wed, July 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Finding Fayette’s Father: Autosomal DNA Reveals Misattributed Parentage
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Traditional documentation clearly identified Fayette’s father without conflict. However, the DNA results of Fayette’s descendants told a different story. Learn how DNA evidence combined with a trail of clues and the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard revealed a secret from the summer of 1913.
Traditional documentation clearly identified Fayette’s father without conflict. However, the DNA results of Fayette’s descendants told a different story. Learn how DNA evidence combined with a trail of clues and the application of the Genealogical Proof Standard revealed a secret from the summer of 1913.
Wed, August 17 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Abstracting Documents: An Essential Skill for All Genealogists
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Every document that is used during genealogical research must be thoroughly and accurately analyzed. Abstracting is a fundamental part of this research and analyzing process. Yet many genealogists are not confident in their ability to perform this task effectively and efficiently. This causes researchers to avoid the abstracting process resulting in research errors. An abstract is a summary of all the important details in a document. This presentation will examine the abstracting process by using examples that show how to abstract a variety of documents, general guidelines for abstracting, what to include and what to eliminate when creating an abstract, and lastly will explore some problems that might be encountered while abstracting.
Every document that is used during genealogical research must be thoroughly and accurately analyzed. Abstracting is a fundamental part of this research and analyzing process. Yet many genealogists are not confident in their ability to perform this task effectively and efficiently. This causes researchers to avoid the abstracting process resulting in research errors. An abstract is a summary of all the important details in a document. This presentation will examine the abstracting process by using examples that show how to abstract a variety of documents, general guidelines for abstracting, what to include and what to eliminate when creating an abstract, and lastly will explore some problems that might be encountered while abstracting.
Wed, September 21 2022: 0:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC
When Wrong is Actually Right: Constructing Proof Arguments for Counterintuitive Conflicts (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Name changes, enumerator errors, and terrible informants can combine to create major inconsistencies in documentation. Records that, at first glance, appear to be major mismatches can later turn out to be correct. Researching non-English-speaking immigrant families requires a comfort level with these layered conflicts-upon-conflicts. This session demonstrates how to use logic to confirm that a wrong-name, wrong-age, wrong-everything record can actually be right, with an emphasis on immigrant families. Participants will learn how to transfer that logic to a written proof argument.
Fri, October 7 2022: 15:00 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:15 UTC
Peeling the Onion: Getting to the Original Sources (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:15 UTC
Genealogy Standards 38 and 58 strongly express a preference for using original sources. Diligent researching and a few tricks of the trade enable genealogists to find original sources that underlie authored narratives and derivative sources.
Genealogy Standards 38 and 58 strongly express a preference for using original sources. Diligent researching and a few tricks of the trade enable genealogists to find original sources that underlie authored narratives and derivative sources.
Fri, October 7 2022: 16:15 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 17:30 UTC
The Hub of the Wheel: How Tracing a Brother with no Children Connected Ten Siblings (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 17:30 UTC
A family from Ireland emigrated in a chain migration scheme to western Pennsylvania between 1825 and 1845. See how using the standards for researching connected the siblings and their descendants and led to their origins in County Tyrone.
A family from Ireland emigrated in a chain migration scheme to western Pennsylvania between 1825 and 1845. See how using the standards for researching connected the siblings and their descendants and led to their origins in County Tyrone.
Fri, October 7 2022: 17:30 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 19:30 UTC
Consult via…Explore with…Discover through…Literature Reviews (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 19:30 UTC
What if you could consult with genealogical experts each time your work slows? Together you could explore options for new paths of discovery. The right approach to a literature review allows you to do that. Other experts have encountered the same challenges that you do, and they have written about them even if not overtly. These challenges could range from beginning work in a new geography to parrying with a difficult brick wall. Learn how to conduct a targeted literature review, cull the information you need, and advance your research. A case study on use of negative evidence will highlight the methodology.
What if you could consult with genealogical experts each time your work slows? Together you could explore options for new paths of discovery. The right approach to a literature review allows you to do that. Other experts have encountered the same challenges that you do, and they have written about them even if not overtly. These challenges could range from beginning work in a new geography to parrying with a difficult brick wall. Learn how to conduct a targeted literature review, cull the information you need, and advance your research. A case study on use of negative evidence will highlight the methodology.
Fri, October 7 2022: 19:30 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:45 UTC
Finding Henrietta: Reconciling Conflicting Evidence to Reveal a Woman’s Identity (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:45 UTC
Henrietta Dixon was never enumerated with individuals identified as her parents in a federal census. Records revealing her family members, including her father, are often conflicting and open up new questions. Additionally, multiple marriages further obscure her identity. This case study uncovers Henrietta’s maiden name and emphasizes the importance of a focused research question when attempting to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Henrietta Dixon was never enumerated with individuals identified as her parents in a federal census. Records revealing her family members, including her father, are often conflicting and open up new questions. Additionally, multiple marriages further obscure her identity. This case study uncovers Henrietta’s maiden name and emphasizes the importance of a focused research question when attempting to meet the Genealogical Proof Standard.
Fri, October 7 2022: 20:45 UTC
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:00 UTC
Hidden Stories: Using Analysis to Explore the Unexpected in Family History (a 2022 Reisinger lecture)
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:00 UTC
Tales of illegitimacy, divorce, and desertion aren’t limited to soap operas and modern reality television. Discovering trails that lead to unanticipated events can be shocking, confusing, and exciting all at the same time. This session will explore how genealogists can utilize the law, conflict resolution, and tools like date calculators and timelines to help build a clearer understanding of some potentially challenging historical situations.
Tales of illegitimacy, divorce, and desertion aren’t limited to soap operas and modern reality television. Discovering trails that lead to unanticipated events can be shocking, confusing, and exciting all at the same time. This session will explore how genealogists can utilize the law, conflict resolution, and tools like date calculators and timelines to help build a clearer understanding of some potentially challenging historical situations.
Fri, October 7 2022: 22:00 UTC
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Misled by Records: Identifying Adam Cosner’s Parentage
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Pennsylvania and Ohio records, correlated with those of a German immigrant who died in Virginia revealed Adam Cosner’s parents.
Pennsylvania and Ohio records, correlated with those of a German immigrant who died in Virginia revealed Adam Cosner’s parents.
Wed, October 19 2022: 0:00 UTC
Wed, November 16 2022: 1:00 UTC
Their Mark Here: Signatures and Marks as Identifying Tools
Wed, November 16 2022: 1:00 UTC
Marks and signatures can be highly effective tools when researchers are attempting to untangle the identities of our forebears. But how do you know whether the signature in front of you is original? Can you still use it as evidence in your case even if it’s not? These questions and more are answered by looking at the fundamental concepts of source and evidence analysis. Once you know how to evaluate your sources, we’ll go over a few records to look at when searching for those marks and signatures in your own research. And finally, we’ll look at some examples of published articles which incorporate the use of marks and signatures.
Marks and signatures can be highly effective tools when researchers are attempting to untangle the identities of our forebears. But how do you know whether the signature in front of you is original? Can you still use it as evidence in your case even if it’s not? These questions and more are answered by looking at the fundamental concepts of source and evidence analysis. Once you know how to evaluate your sources, we’ll go over a few records to look at when searching for those marks and signatures in your own research. And finally, we’ll look at some examples of published articles which incorporate the use of marks and signatures.
Wed, November 16 2022: 1:00 UTC
Wed, December 21 2022: 1:00 UTC
French Emigrants: They Were Not All Huguenots, or Nobles, or From Alsace-Lorraine
Wed, December 21 2022: 1:00 UTC
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the nineteenth century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the nineteenth century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
Wed, December 21 2022: 1:00 UTC

Featured Webinars

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1:19:11
Negative Evidence: Making Something Out of Nothing
When is not finding a record nothing, and when does it signify something? Information that is not where you expect it to be may yield important evidence for your research question. Understanding the purpose of a source — who and what it records, and why — will help you determine if the missing person or event is negative evidence or merely a negative search. A series of examples demonstrate methodologies used to create something out of nothing.
When is not finding a record nothing, and when does it signify something? Information that is not where you expect it to be may yield important evidence for your research question. Understanding the purpose of a source — who and what it records, and why — will help you determine if the missing person or event is negative evidence or merely a negative search. A series of examples demonstrate methodologies used to create something out of nothing.
Wed, June 22 2022: 0:00 UTC
6:08
804 views
CC
How I Debunked an Online Tree Hint
Hints in online trees can provide genealogical treasures, but if you’re not careful they can lead to genealogical regret. In this quick video, Geoff Rasmussen shows why hints should be explored, scrutinized and evaluated.
Hints in online trees can provide genealogical treasures, but if you’re not careful they can lead to genealogical regret. In this quick video, Geoff Rasmussen shows why hints should be explored, scrutinized and evaluated.
Fri, June 10 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:22:23
Documents + DNA + Method + a little bit of Luck: Combining Tools to Find Biological Family
Finding an adopted child’s biological family is especially challenging for genealogists. This presentation list the steps one can take to identify an unknown parent or grandparent and dissects a successful case to show how good methodology combined with document research and DNA matches can put a decades-old question to rest.
Finding an adopted child’s biological family is especially challenging for genealogists. This presentation list the steps one can take to identify an unknown parent or grandparent and dissects a successful case to show how good methodology combined with document research and DNA matches can put a decades-old question to rest.
Thu, June 9 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:03:56
1.2K views
CC
Indirect Evidence – A Case Study
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
This Connecticut-based, indirect evidence case study will highlight techniques for researching a woman whose maiden name is known, but her parents are unknown due to deficiencies in the vital records. Techniques will be demonstrated that rely on forming hypotheses and gathering evidence to test those hypotheses. Thorough research of neighbors and associates (the FAN principle) will yield enough evidence to tie this woman back into her family. Records used include pre-1850 census records, deeds, probate, church, and court. Death records of family members provide the final clues that tie them all together.
Wed, May 18 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:21:02
Five Wives & A Feather Bed: Using Indirect and Negative Evidence to Resolve Conflicting Claims
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Genealogical scholars make conflicting claims about the number of wives, and the number and mothers of the children, of Joseph Brownell, a Mayflower descendant of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, born at Little Compton, Rhode Island, 16 February 1699, to Thomas Brownell and Esther Taber. These conflicting claims raise significant questions about the makeup of Joseph Brownell’s family. Did he have one, two or five wives? Did he have one, three or eight children? To which wife, or wives, were they born? The presenter will lead participants through reasonably exhaustive research and standards-based evaluation of indirect and negative evidence found in Quaker meeting records, and vital, land and probate records to demonstrate how proof can be constructed to answer these questions. Correlation of this evidence with the timespan of each marriage will then enable his children to be assigned to their correct mothers.
Wed, May 18 2022: 0:00 UTC
1:14:27
917 views
CC
Unlocking Stories of Our Female Ancestors through Effective Research Methodology
We will explore how implementing standard research methodology may open up new avenues of discovery to unlock previously “hidden” evidence of female ancestors’ stories. Using reasonably exhaustive research, evidence correlation, analysis proof standard elements and cluster research methodology, we can uncover critical information to help us develop our female ancestors’ stories. Today’s discussion includes two case studies of females born in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An exploration of sources, beyond census and marriage records, was required to enhance their life stories. One subject was born into an affluent family who settled in north central Tennessee, and the second was enslaved from birth until Emancipation in western Kentucky.
We will explore how implementing standard research methodology may open up new avenues of discovery to unlock previously “hidden” evidence of female ancestors’ stories. Using reasonably exhaustive research, evidence correlation, analysis proof standard elements and cluster research methodology, we can uncover critical information to help us develop our female ancestors’ stories. Today’s discussion includes two case studies of females born in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An exploration of sources, beyond census and marriage records, was required to enhance their life stories. One subject was born into an affluent family who settled in north central Tennessee, and the second was enslaved from birth until Emancipation in western Kentucky.
Wed, April 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
1:10:04
Proving Parentage Two Centuries Later Using DNA Evidence
Proving immigrant origins may seem daunting, especially when the family lived hundreds of years ago. This presentation shows how to navigate multiple border crossings, name changes, and cultural challenges and apply DNA techniques to trace a family of Canadian immigrants from town to town. The right combination of documentary evidence and biological evidence, coupled with sound methodology, reveals the origins of this family.
Proving immigrant origins may seem daunting, especially when the family lived hundreds of years ago. This presentation shows how to navigate multiple border crossings, name changes, and cultural challenges and apply DNA techniques to trace a family of Canadian immigrants from town to town. The right combination of documentary evidence and biological evidence, coupled with sound methodology, reveals the origins of this family.
Wed, April 20 2022: 0:00 UTC
50:20
1.2K views
CC
Spinsters and Widows: Using Women to Reconstruct Families
We frequently bemoan the dearth of records left by women, but records left by spinsters and widows can be particularly valuable for reconstructing families when properly analyzed. Many people neglect to research spinsters (women who never married) as they have no descendants, but to whom shall they leave their estates? Extended family! Tracing widows to see who they live with can reveal previously unknown family members. See examples where women’s records have illuminated familial relationships and learn strategies to apply to your own research.
We frequently bemoan the dearth of records left by women, but records left by spinsters and widows can be particularly valuable for reconstructing families when properly analyzed. Many people neglect to research spinsters (women who never married) as they have no descendants, but to whom shall they leave their estates? Extended family! Tracing widows to see who they live with can reveal previously unknown family members. See examples where women’s records have illuminated familial relationships and learn strategies to apply to your own research.
Fri, April 8 2022: 16:00 UTC
52:24
1.9K views
CC
Simply using timelines will make a difference in your research!
This session will walk attendees through the steps of using a timeline and building a research plan at the same time.
This session will walk attendees through the steps of using a timeline and building a research plan at the same time.
Fri, April 8 2022: 14:00 UTC