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Wed, March 20 2024: 0:00 UTC
Maternal Threads Unwoven: Identifying Margareta’s Mother in 18th Century Sweden
Wed, March 20 2024: 0:00 UTC
In spite of birth entries for Margareta’s five siblings in Hishult, there was no record of her birth in the parish. Tax records quickly identified the father, and revealed multiple moves within a narrow span of time; however, identification of the mother remained elusive. No witnesses to births of the children provided clues; no household examinations existed. Coupling the understanding of broad context (naming patterns, inheritance laws, the calendar shift, etc.) with mtDNA and documentary evidence, the mother was identified and the lack of a records was explained.
In spite of birth entries for Margareta’s five siblings in Hishult, there was no record of her birth in the parish. Tax records quickly identified the father, and revealed multiple moves within a narrow span of time; however, identification of the mother remained elusive. No witnesses to births of the children provided clues; no household examinations existed. Coupling the understanding of broad context (naming patterns, inheritance laws, the calendar shift, etc.) with mtDNA and documentary evidence, the mother was identified and the lack of a records was explained.
Wed, March 20 2024: 0:00 UTC
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
French Emigrants: They Were Not All Huguenots, or Nobles, or from Alsace-Lorraine
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the 19th century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
One of the great difficulties for people researching their French immigrant ancestors’ roots is that so little is known outside of France about when and why the French left their country. This dearth of knowledge has led many family historians of the 19th century to presume Huguenot, noble émigré or Alsace-Lorraine ancestry for any ancestor with a French name. The supposition became a family legend that then became a research frustration as more recent family historians attempt to prove what was never more than a misguided supposition. This webinar looks at the many waves of French migration, as well as the three mentioned in the title, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The historical reasons for when, why and to where they emigrated will provide the key points to bear in mind when conducting research. The bibliography, in English and French, contains not only books and articles concerning French emigration but a list of websites to aid the researcher.
Tue, April 16 2024: 16:00 UTC
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 1
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will addresses the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, May 22 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Editing Your Own Writing – Part 2
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Genealogists write. Their written narratives include stories of ancestral families, biographies of individual ancestors, and explanations supporting genealogical proofs. For their writing to succeed, genealogists—like all effective writers—repeatedly self-edit everything they write. The process results in polished products that the genealogist’s readers will understand, enjoy, and cherish. Emphasizing genealogical narrative, these two webinars will address the self-editing process. Part 1 will focus on “big-picture” editing, including stages of self-editing; focus; keeping the writer out of the narrative; editing the writing’s overall structure, organization, and flow; and improving major and minor subdivisions of written genealogical narratives, including paragraphing. Part 2 will focus on “nitty-gritty” editing, including capitalization, punctuation, sentence structure, spelling, word choice, and reducing word count.
Wed, June 19 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral Genealogy in Asia-Pacific: The Essence of Personal Identity and Tribal Connections
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Oral genealogies celebrate ancestral connections in indigenous cultures across Asia-Pacific. As one paramount chief in Samoa declared, “The most important thing for children to understand is their family connections. The knowledge of history is their treasure—not gold and silver, but genealogy.” Learn about the significance and richness of oral genealogies and current efforts to preserve them in Asia and the Pacific.
Wed, July 17 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
He Had a Brother Who Disappeared: Finding John H. Hickey, Formerly of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Family tradition holds that John H. Hickey of Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois, disappeared. This case study proves John “disappeared” and establishes the missing man’s fate. A patchwork of records allowed a glimpse into the life of a person thought dead.
Wed, August 21 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
A Myriad of Slave Databases
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
In the summer of 2023 American Ancestors/New England Historic Genealogical Society announced the collaborative 10 Million Names project, an undertaking to recover the names of people of African descent who were enslaved in the area of the United States. This monumental task of centralizing datasets about African Americans is likely to take years to accomplish; in the interim, this webinar provides a useful survey of the many existing databases that serve a similar purpose though limited in scope.
In the summer of 2023 American Ancestors/New England Historic Genealogical Society announced the collaborative 10 Million Names project, an undertaking to recover the names of people of African descent who were enslaved in the area of the United States. This monumental task of centralizing datasets about African Americans is likely to take years to accomplish; in the interim, this webinar provides a useful survey of the many existing databases that serve a similar purpose though limited in scope.
Wed, September 18 2024: 0:00 UTC
Wed, October 16 2024: 0:00 UTC
Sense and Sensibility: The Power of Logic, Intuition, and Critical Thinking
Wed, October 16 2024: 0:00 UTC
Is it logical that a woman born in 1752 gave birth to a son in 1848? Do I have enough evidence to conclude that Johan Kannon of Trondheim, Norway, was the same person as John Connell from Cut-and-Shoot, Texas? Why do I share 300 cM of DNA with three people I’ve never heard of? Genealogists make hundreds of decisions everyday based on thousands of pieces of information harvested from various sources. We automatically, and often unconsciously, use common sense, logic, and even intuition, to identify relevant evidence, problem-solve, and answer complex questions. Learning to harness the power of logic, syllogism, and our own “Spidey-senses,” can help scale brick-walls, solve DNA mysteries, and organize mountains of information. This talk focuses on how to incorporate logic, common sense, and critical thinking in a more deliberate way to create hypotheses, test theories, and support conclusions. Johnson will share exercises that can bulk up logic and critical thought muscles, as well as practical tips on how to apply common sense and sensibility to your family history research and writing.
Is it logical that a woman born in 1752 gave birth to a son in 1848? Do I have enough evidence to conclude that Johan Kannon of Trondheim, Norway, was the same person as John Connell from Cut-and-Shoot, Texas? Why do I share 300 cM of DNA with three people I’ve never heard of? Genealogists make hundreds of decisions everyday based on thousands of pieces of information harvested from various sources. We automatically, and often unconsciously, use common sense, logic, and even intuition, to identify relevant evidence, problem-solve, and answer complex questions. Learning to harness the power of logic, syllogism, and our own “Spidey-senses,” can help scale brick-walls, solve DNA mysteries, and organize mountains of information. This talk focuses on how to incorporate logic, common sense, and critical thinking in a more deliberate way to create hypotheses, test theories, and support conclusions. Johnson will share exercises that can bulk up logic and critical thought muscles, as well as practical tips on how to apply common sense and sensibility to your family history research and writing.
Wed, October 16 2024: 0:00 UTC
Tue, November 19 2024: 19:00 UTC
Dear Me: Writing Research Reports to Yourself
Tue, November 19 2024: 19:00 UTC
Research reports are not just for professionals, but are a great tool for anyone who wants to answer their research questions. Write a research report to yourself to organize your thoughts, analyze the evidence, document your findings, and solve your puzzles. Using an example from the Netherlands, this presentation demonstrates how you can organize a research report to spot more clues in records, discover and resolve discrepancies, and build reliable conclusions.
Research reports are not just for professionals, but are a great tool for anyone who wants to answer their research questions. Write a research report to yourself to organize your thoughts, analyze the evidence, document your findings, and solve your puzzles. Using an example from the Netherlands, this presentation demonstrates how you can organize a research report to spot more clues in records, discover and resolve discrepancies, and build reliable conclusions.
Tue, November 19 2024: 19:00 UTC
Wed, December 18 2024: 1:00 UTC
Lost and Found: Locating Ancestral Origins with FAN Club and DNA
Wed, December 18 2024: 1:00 UTC
It’s hard to do genealogy well without studying your ancestors’ Friends & Family, Associates, and Neighbors – their FAN club. If your ancestors are Irish, you might have no luck at all without those FAN principles. But if you combine FAN club research with DNA, you might have just the winning ticket to get you back to your Irish ancestor’s origins. In this case study presentation, learn how focused research pointed the way from Ohio to townlands in County Mayo for an 1850s-era Irish immigrant.
It’s hard to do genealogy well without studying your ancestors’ Friends & Family, Associates, and Neighbors – their FAN club. If your ancestors are Irish, you might have no luck at all without those FAN principles. But if you combine FAN club research with DNA, you might have just the winning ticket to get you back to your Irish ancestor’s origins. In this case study presentation, learn how focused research pointed the way from Ohio to townlands in County Mayo for an 1850s-era Irish immigrant.
Wed, December 18 2024: 1:00 UTC

Featured Webinars

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1:17:15
Finding Females: Wives, Mothers, Daughters, Sisters & Paramours
One of the toughest challenges faced by genealogists is the difficulty of identifying and tracking females. Wives and mothers traditionally have been “supporting characters” to the roles played by their husbands and sons—bearing no known name other than that of the males they married or bore. Historically, social mores and law codes made them second-class citizens, without a legal identity of their own and few rights or opportunities to create the range of records that genealogists customarily use to trace males. This session presents an array of resources—and, more importantly, techniques and strategies backed by case studies—we can use to establish the identities of elusive females.
One of the toughest challenges faced by genealogists is the difficulty of identifying and tracking females. Wives and mothers traditionally have been “supporting characters” to the roles played by their husbands and sons—bearing no known name other than that of the males they married or bore. Historically, social mores and law codes made them second-class citizens, without a legal identity of their own and few rights or opportunities to create the range of records that genealogists customarily use to trace males. This session presents an array of resources—and, more importantly, techniques and strategies backed by case studies—we can use to establish the identities of elusive females.
Fri, February 23 2024: 19:00 UTC
1:23:02
Genealogy Smart Start: Things I Wish I’d Known
Get some great tips from this genealogist who had to learn the basics the hard way, plus a few smart tricks she picked up from experts along the way. You can start smarter than I did!
Get some great tips from this genealogist who had to learn the basics the hard way, plus a few smart tricks she picked up from experts along the way. You can start smarter than I did!
Thu, February 22 2024: 1:00 UTC
1:22:32
1.3K views
CC
Metes & Bounds Land Plats Solve Genealogical Problems
This session provides a brief overview of metes and bounds land descriptions seen in deeds, mortgages, patents, grants, and other land documents. The land descriptions are an essential part of land research. This presentation discusses metes and bounds land descriptions and how the metes and bounds can solve genealogical problems.
This session provides a brief overview of metes and bounds land descriptions seen in deeds, mortgages, patents, grants, and other land documents. The land descriptions are an essential part of land research. This presentation discusses metes and bounds land descriptions and how the metes and bounds can solve genealogical problems.
Wed, February 21 2024: 1:00 UTC
1:18:24
Finding Fathers: Tracking Males Who “Disappeared” or “Just Showed Up”
The legendary Choctaw Chief Pushmataha swore that he sprang full grown from Mother Earth. As genealogists, we sometimes wonder whether our ancestors did the same. Most elusive men do have traceable origins, once we learn to deal with the issues that thwart us—migration, high mortality rates, and illegitimacy being not the least of them. This hour offers practical suggestions and strategies for extending paternal lines, focusing upon the pre-1850 period when censuses don’t identify children in parental households.
The legendary Choctaw Chief Pushmataha swore that he sprang full grown from Mother Earth. As genealogists, we sometimes wonder whether our ancestors did the same. Most elusive men do have traceable origins, once we learn to deal with the issues that thwart us—migration, high mortality rates, and illegitimacy being not the least of them. This hour offers practical suggestions and strategies for extending paternal lines, focusing upon the pre-1850 period when censuses don’t identify children in parental households.
Fri, January 26 2024: 19:00 UTC
1:15:14
2.0K views
CC
The Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS): A Review
How do you know when you have genealogical proof? You apply the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) to your completed research. The GPS is how genealogists test conclusions–whether it is your research or other people’s research. Recognize why meeting the GPS is essential and when it is appropriate. Learn about the five interdependent components of the GPS. Understanding the GPS and being able to apply it will hone your research skills.
How do you know when you have genealogical proof? You apply the Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS) to your completed research. The GPS is how genealogists test conclusions–whether it is your research or other people’s research. Recognize why meeting the GPS is essential and when it is appropriate. Learn about the five interdependent components of the GPS. Understanding the GPS and being able to apply it will hone your research skills.
Wed, January 17 2024: 1:00 UTC
Advanced
1:16:13
Using Evidence Creatively: Spotting Clues in Run-of-the-Mill Records
The records we use are filled with “trivia,” bits and pieces of information that seem to have no “genealogical” value—at least not until we become more innovative in our research and analysis. Each piece of trivia in every document is an opportunity waiting to be connected to something else. Our ability to resolve problems depends upon our ability to make those connections. This class explores eighteen types of records and the kind of hidden clues each offers to help us resolve problems of identity, kinship, and origin. *** This class requires an active webinar membership to attend. ***
The records we use are filled with “trivia,” bits and pieces of information that seem to have no “genealogical” value—at least not until we become more innovative in our research and analysis. Each piece of trivia in every document is an opportunity waiting to be connected to something else. Our ability to resolve problems depends upon our ability to make those connections. This class explores eighteen types of records and the kind of hidden clues each offers to help us resolve problems of identity, kinship, and origin. *** This class requires an active webinar membership to attend. ***
Fri, December 22 2023: 19:00 UTC
1:09:14
Finding Sophia’s Family: A Case of Fratricide and Forgotten Identity
A quarrel between brothers turns into tragedy. The murdered man’s young widow and children leave their rural home for city life, never returning. Former family connections are forgotten in time. This webinar illustrates the case of finding the birth family of a mid-nineteenth-century South Carolina widow who left her family’s homeplace. No record provides an exact birthplace or fully identifies her parents. Learn how widow Sophia’s forgotten identity was reconstructed by understanding the era’s social context, creating and testing hypotheses, and conducting whole family research.
A quarrel between brothers turns into tragedy. The murdered man’s young widow and children leave their rural home for city life, never returning. Former family connections are forgotten in time. This webinar illustrates the case of finding the birth family of a mid-nineteenth-century South Carolina widow who left her family’s homeplace. No record provides an exact birthplace or fully identifies her parents. Learn how widow Sophia’s forgotten identity was reconstructed by understanding the era’s social context, creating and testing hypotheses, and conducting whole family research.
Wed, December 20 2023: 1:00 UTC
1:13:40
2.2K views
CC
5 Tips for Deciphering Handwritten Documents
Reading handwritten documents can be one of the most challenging aspects of genealogical research. This webinar will offer five tips from a genealogical translator to help you make those hard to read words understandable.
Reading handwritten documents can be one of the most challenging aspects of genealogical research. This webinar will offer five tips from a genealogical translator to help you make those hard to read words understandable.
Wed, December 6 2023: 19:00 UTC
56:48
282 views
CC
Can You Write a Wrong? Copyright in Australia
Knowing what we can freely use, without permission, in our family histories ensures that we are not infringing on the rights of others. For example, did you know that if you watch your grandmother make her secret pasta sauce, writing down the ingredients and methods she used, you have created your own ‘literary work’ which is now protected by copyright? (Just don’t tell Granny!) How then does copyright law apply to published and unpublished works? What is fair use and moral rights? Can a distant cousin use information in her family book that I have researched? This presentation will examine those aspects of Australia’s copyright law which apply to family historians and discusses ways we can comply with the law.
Knowing what we can freely use, without permission, in our family histories ensures that we are not infringing on the rights of others. For example, did you know that if you watch your grandmother make her secret pasta sauce, writing down the ingredients and methods she used, you have created your own ‘literary work’ which is now protected by copyright? (Just don’t tell Granny!) How then does copyright law apply to published and unpublished works? What is fair use and moral rights? Can a distant cousin use information in her family book that I have researched? This presentation will examine those aspects of Australia’s copyright law which apply to family historians and discusses ways we can comply with the law.
Wed, December 6 2023: 1:00 UTC