Notice: some of the webinars’ videos aren’t available right now. We’re working to resolve this asap. Thanks for your patience and understanding.

Notice: some of the webinars’ videos aren’t available right now. We’re working to resolve this asap. Thanks for your patience and understanding.

Janice Lovelace, PhD

Janice Lovelace is a genealogical researcher, educator, author, and lecturer, with over thirty years of experience. She completed the Genealogy and Family History certificate at the University of Washington in 2012, the certificate program in genealogy at Boston University in 2013, and ProGen in 2014. Dr. Lovelace is a frequent speaker at international, national, and regional genealogy conferences as well as local societies on health and genetics, ethnic minority genealogy, and research methodology. She is an instructor at the Midwest African American Genealogical Institute (MAAGI). A retired college faculty member, Dr. Lovelace authored the National Genealogical Society’s online continuing education course African American Roots: A Historical Perspective. A freelance writer and photographer, she has a number of genealogy articles among her publications. A member of the Seattle Genealogical Society for many years, she has served in several board positions. She is also a member of Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), the Ohio Genealogical Society, Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society (AAHGS), and the National Genealogical Society (NGS).

Janice's Upcoming Live Webinars (1)

Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
African Americans Heading West
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC
After the end of the Civil War in 1865, African Americans began leaving the areas where they had been enslaved. Many went to North to larger towns where work was more plentiful. But less discussed is that a number went West to farm, using the Homestead Act of 1862 to claim land of their own. Other settled in and helped develop some all-Black towns in Kansas and Oklahoma. Still others headed to the Pacific Coast for work. What can we find out about these settlers’ lives? Where can we find records?
After the end of the Civil War in 1865, African Americans began leaving the areas where they had been enslaved. Many went to North to larger towns where work was more plentiful. But less discussed is that a number went West to farm, using the Homestead Act of 1862 to claim land of their own. Other settled in and helped develop some all-Black towns in Kansas and Oklahoma. Still others headed to the Pacific Coast for work. What can we find out about these settlers’ lives? Where can we find records?
Fri, August 5 2022: 18:00 UTC

Janice's Webinars (5)