Denyce Porter Peyton

Denyce has been an avid genealogist for over 25 years, providing professional research since 2004. She is a member of the National Genealogical Society, Association for Professional Genealogists, Ohio Genealogical Society, Kentucky Historical Society, Kentucky Genealogical Society, Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, Hamilton County Genealogical Society, African American Genealogy Group of Kentucky and the lineage society of Sons and Daughters of the United States Middle Passage. Her research specialties focus on nineteenth and twentieth century Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, and Southeastern states, and African Americans in antebellum and post-Emancipation eras. She provides research services to a diverse client base. Denyce has participated and received completion certificates in “Advanced Methodology and Evidence Analysis” at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR), University of Georgia (July 2017), the ProGen31 study group from June 2016-November 2017, and “Genealogy Writing from Planning to Publication” at the Midwestern African American Genealogy Institute, Fort Wayne, Indiana (July 2018). She researched and authored an investigative study, “African American Settlement in Allen County, Ohio – through Census Schedules”, published in Ohio Genealogical Society Quarterly Vol. 52 No 3 Fall 2012, and provided independent research efforts for an episode of Henry Louis Gates Jr.’s “Finding Your Roots” on PBS.

Denyce's Upcoming Live Webinars (1)

Wed, April 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
Unlocking Stories of Our Female Ancestors through Effective Research Methodology
Wed, April 20 2022: 18:00 UTC
We will explore how implementing standard research methodology may open up new avenues of discovery to unlock previously “hidden” evidence of female ancestors’ stories. Using reasonably exhaustive research, evidence correlation, analysis proof standard elements and cluster research methodology, we can uncover critical information to help us develop our female ancestors’ stories. Today’s discussion includes two case studies of females born in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An exploration of sources, beyond census and marriage records, was required to enhance their life stories. One subject was born into an affluent family who settled in north central Tennessee, and the second was enslaved from birth until Emancipation in western Kentucky.
We will explore how implementing standard research methodology may open up new avenues of discovery to unlock previously “hidden” evidence of female ancestors’ stories. Using reasonably exhaustive research, evidence correlation, analysis proof standard elements and cluster research methodology, we can uncover critical information to help us develop our female ancestors’ stories. Today’s discussion includes two case studies of females born in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. An exploration of sources, beyond census and marriage records, was required to enhance their life stories. One subject was born into an affluent family who settled in north central Tennessee, and the second was enslaved from birth until Emancipation in western Kentucky.
Wed, April 20 2022: 18:00 UTC