They Had Names: Identifying Children Represented by Tick Marks in Pre-1850 Censuses

They Had Names: Identifying Children Represented by Tick Marks in Pre-1850 Censuses


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by Denise E. Cross, MSLIS, CG

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They Had Names: Identifying Children Represented by Tick Marks in Pre-1850 Censuses


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Early nineteenth century censuses represented children in a household with nameless tick marks in gender and age categories. Their identities can be discovered despite the absence of birth records by using the tick marks to determine an approximate birth year then build an exhaustively researched FAN for the head of household. Correlation tools, geographic proximity in land records and later censuses, and ruling out same named individuals, all provide the indirect evidence to give names to the tick marks.


 
 

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Presenter: Denise E. Cross, MSLIS, CG

Denise Cross, MSLIS, CG, is a community college librarian who enjoys research, especially digging deep for an elusive answer. Researching her family since the 1990s, she began formalized education in genealogy with the Boston University Certificate Program in Genealogical Research in 2015. The course opened up the world of methodology to extract indirect evidence from records. Her focus is writing and she has pubished several articles since 2016. She is a winner of the 2020 AGS Scholar Award
and was granted the Certified Genealogist credential the same year.

Denise E.  Cross, MSLIS, CG