DNA Research for Genealogists: Beyond the Basics Date Presented

Among the tens of thousands of individuals that have already experienced the novelty of genetic testing for ancestral or genealogical purposes, many are still wondering about the real benefits that such testing may bring to their family history repertoire. Few individuals may have given in to pressure by others, or simply for curiosity. Whether you have been already tested and are still wondering about what all those letters and numbers from your genetic genealogy report mean, or whether you are contemplating if DNA testing for family history is something for you, this lecture will offer you some online tools that are available to interpret your results and get the most out of your genetic testing. We will also focus on a few successful DNA genealogy cases and conclude with a description of consultation services available to those that think genetic genealogy is an exciting field, but fear it is too complex of a tool to them.

 
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Wednesday, March 21, 2012
 
Presenter : Ugo Perego

Ugo A. Perego, PhD, MSc, is the CEO for the Salt Lake City based Genetic Genealogy Consultant and a scientist affiliated with the DNA laboratory of Professor Antonio Torroni at the University of Pavia in Italy. He has previously worked for more than a decade as a senior researcher with the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation and GeneTree.com both based in Utah. Ugo earned a BSc and an MSc in Health Sciences at Brigham Young University (Provo, Utah) and a PhD in Genetic and Biomolecular Sciences at the University of Pavia, Italy. Ugo has contributed numerous lectures and publications on DNA and its applications to population genetics, genealogy, ancestry, forensics, and history. Some of his recent publications include “Decrypting the mitochondrial gene pool of modern Panamanians” (in PLoS One, 2012); “The Mountain Meadows Massacre and ‘poisoned springs’: Scientific testing of the more recent, anthrax theory” (in International Journal of Legal Medicine, 2012) “Mitochondrial haplogroup C4c: a rare lineage entering America through the ice-free corridor?” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2011); “Expanding the concept of family history through DNA” (in Family Chronicle, 2010); “Mitochondrial DNA: a female perspective in recent human origin and evolution” (in Origins as a Paradigm in the Sciences and in the Humanities, 2010); and “The initial peopling of the Americas: a growing number of founding mitochondrial genomes from Beringia” (in Genome Research, 2010).